School of Medicine


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  • Sarah Eagleman

    Sarah Eagleman

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio For over a decade my research career as a systems neuroscientist has been centered on measuring the brain in different states of consciousness using electrophysiology. Two ways to study conscious transitions empirically are by investigating the brain during sleep and while under anesthesia. I spent my doctoral and early postdoctoral work studying how sleep improves learning and memory at the neural network level. Currently, I study the brain activity associated with anesthetic state transitions to broaden my understanding of the neural dynamics associated with altered conscious states. In fact, the brain shares similar electrophysiological activity patterns during sleep with some anesthetic transitions. With anesthetics, however, one can compare how different anesthetic agents interact with different neuromodulatory systems to cause similar behavioral outcomes (i.e. sedation and unconsciousness).

    My current projects include exploring and evaluating different computational approaches to quantify anesthetic depth using electrophysiology in various anesthetic protocols, identifying perioperative anesthesia risk factors for poor cognitive outcomes, and understanding the influence of anesthesia on neural circuits in patients with epilepsy. A thorough characterization of the brain activity associated with brain state transitions during anesthesia administration is of critical importance to better monitor patients and improve outcomes.

  • Alex N. Eischeid, MD

    Alex N. Eischeid, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Eischeid is a board-certified neurologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology, Division of Movement Disorders at Stanford University School of Medicine. He specializes in the management of a wide range of neurological conditions. His focus is on movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, atypical parkinsonism, Huntington’s disease, ataxia, dystonia, and tremor. He has advanced training in botulinum toxin injections for dystonia and spasticity. Dr. Eischeid also delivers expertise in deep brain stimulation programming. With each patient, his goal is to safely and effectively relieve symptoms while improving quality of life.

    Dr. Eischeid has been a presenter at the Stanford Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center Neuropathology Case Conference. He also has participated in meetings of the Movement Disorders Society and American Academy of Neurology.

    Scholarship activities of Dr. Eischeid include writing peer-reviewed articles on topics such as the intracellular signaling that enables microglia to increase neurogenesis. His work has appeared in BMC Neuroscience, the Journal of Immunology, PLoS One, and elsewhere.

    Among his honors, Dr. Eischeid received the Resident Fincham Award, given to a graduating neurology resident who best exemplifies the qualities of dedicated patient care and the highest level of collegiality. He was also named Administrative Chief Neurology Resident, an awarded position based on leadership qualities and academic performance. As a senior resident, he earned recognition as the “Best Resident On-Call.” Dr. Eischeid is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and Movement Disorders Society. He served on the Board of Directors of the Iowa Neurological Association. In his personal time, Dr. Eischeid has provided volunteer medical services at homeless shelters.

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