School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 42 Results

  • Stephen J. Galli, MD

    Stephen J. Galli, MD

    The Mary Hewitt Loveless, M.D. Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goals of Dr. Galli's laboratory are to understand the regulation of mast cell and basophil development and function, and to develop and use genetic approaches to elucidate the roles of these cells in health and disease. We study both the roles of mast cells, basophils, and IgE in normal physiology and host defense, e.g., in responses to parasites and in enhancing resistance to venoms, and also their roles in pathology, e.g., anaphylaxis, food allergy, and asthma, both in mice and humans.

  • Hayley Gans

    Hayley Gans

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The focus of my laboratory is the immune response to viral vaccines evaluating the ontogeny of responses in infants and limitations in immunocompromised hosts. We have studied responses to an early two-dose measles immunization, one versus 2 doses of varicella immunization, and polio vaccine in preterm versus term infants. Other active areas of research include measles and varicella immunity in HIV infected individuals, and transplant recipients.

  • Christopher Gardner

    Christopher Gardner

    Rehnborg Farquhar Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The role of nutrition in individual and societal health, with particular interests in: plant-based diets, differential response to low-carb vs. low-fat weight loss diets by insulin resistance status, chronic disease prevention, randomized controlled trials, human nutrition, community based studies, Community Based Participatory Research, sustainable food movement (animal rights and welfare, global warming, human labor practices), stealth health, nutrition policy, nutrition guidelines

  • Joseph Garner

    Joseph Garner

    Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The medical research community has long recognized that “good well-being is good science”. The lab uses an integrated interdisciplinary approach to explore this interface, while providing tangible deliverables for the well-being of human patients and research animals.

  • Brice Gaudilliere

    Brice Gaudilliere

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult-MSD) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The advent of high dimensional flow cytometry has revolutionized our ability to study and visualize the human immune system. Our group combines high parameter mass cytometry (a.k.a Cytometry by Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry, CyTOF), with advanced bio-computational methods to study how the human immune system responds and adapts to acute physiological perturbations. The laboratory currently focuses on two clinical scenarios: surgical trauma and pregnancy.

  • Pascal Geldsetzer

    Pascal Geldsetzer

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Bio Pascal Geldsetzer is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. He has been a study coordinator and postdoctoral research fellow with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Tanzania and Eswatini, completed the Young Professionals Program of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) in Namibia, and was a German National Merit Scholar.

  • Grace Gengoux

    Grace Gengoux

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Grace Gengoux is Director of the Autism Intervention Clinic and leads an autism intervention research program focused on developing and evaluating promising behavioral and developmental treatments for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

    Dr. Gengoux is also the Psychiatry Department Well-being Director and leads the Department of Psychiatry Well-being Workgroup.

  • Yael Gernez

    Yael Gernez

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Immunology and Allergy

    Bio My clinic focuses on solving the molecular puzzles that underlie rare allergic and immunologic diseases to shed light on fundamental principles governing allergy, inflammation and immune system defects. My goal is to find better and safer therapies for my patients with rare diseases that include autoinflammation, autoimmunity and primary immune deficiency. It is important to highlight that every patient requires individualized therapeutic approaches based on their underlying genetic problem and the types and severity of their clinical manifestations. For some patients, a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is curative while for others, a targeted drug therapy, such as a biologic or small molecule agent, is most suitable. In some cases, a truly novel therapy may be required, .e.g., anti-sense oligonucleotide therapy to suppress aberrant gene splicing or adoptive cellular therapy. My passion is to provide the best personalized therapy for our patients with allergy and immunology diseases. This often requires performing very specialized functional assays and in some cases in enlisting laboratories with specific expertise or interest in particular genetic disorders.

  • Margot Gerritsen

    Margot Gerritsen

    Professor of Energy Resources Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research
    My work is about understanding and simulating complicated fluid flow problems. My research focuses on the design of highly accurate and efficient parallel computational methods to predict the performance of enhanced oil recovery methods. I'm particularly interested in gas injection and in-situ combustion processes. These recovery methods are extremely challenging to simulate because of the very strong nonlinearities in the governing equations. Outside petroleum engineering, I'm active in coastal ocean simulation with colleagues from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, yacht research and pterosaur flight mechanics with colleagues from the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, and the design of search algorithms in collaboration with the Library of Congress and colleagues from the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering.

    Teaching
    I teach courses in both energy related topics (reservoir simulation, energy, and the environment) in my department, and mathematics for engineers through the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering (ICME). I also initiated two courses in professional development in our department (presentation skills and teaching assistant training), and a consulting course for graduate students in ICME, which offers expertise in computational methods to the Stanford community and selected industries.

    Professional Activities
    Senior Associate Dean, School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences, Stanford (from 2015); Director, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Stanford (from 2010); Stanford Fellow (2010-2012); Magne Espedal Professor II, Bergen University (2011-2014); Aldo Leopold Fellow (2009); Chair, SIAM Activity group in Geosciences (2007, present, reelected in 2009); Faculty Research Fellow, Clayman Institute (2008); Elected to Council of Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) (2007); organizing committee, 2008 Gordon Conference on Flow in Porous Media; producer, Smart Energy podcast channel; Director, Stanford Yacht Research; Co-director and founder, Stanford Center of Excellence for Computational Algorithms in Digital Stewardship; Editor, Journal of Small Craft Technology; Associate editor, Transport in Porous Media; Reviewer for various journals and organizations including SPE, DoE, NSF, Journal of Computational Physics, Journal of Scientific Computing, Transport in Porous Media, Computational Geosciences; member, SIAM, SPE, KIVI, AGU, and APS

  • Olivier Gevaert

    Olivier Gevaert

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab focuses on biomedical data fusion: the development of machine learning methods for biomedical decision support using multi-scale biomedical data. We primarily use methods based on regularized linear regression to accomplish this. We primarily focus on applications in oncology and neuroscience.

  • Amato J. Giaccia

    Amato J. Giaccia

    Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor, Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests During the last five years, we have identified several small molecules that kill VHL deficient renal cancer cells through a synthetic lethal screening approach. Another major interest of my laboratory is in identifying hypoxia-induced genes involved in invasion and metastases. We are also investigating how hypoxia regulates gene expression epigenetically.

  • William Giardino

    William Giardino

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our group aims to decipher the neural mechanisms underlying psychiatric conditions of stress, addiction, and sleep disturbances. Our work uses combinatorial technologies for precisely mapping, monitoring, and manipulating neural circuits that drive hedonic and homeostatic states. Projects in the lab are funded by the NIH Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism (NIAAA) and by an Innovator Grant from Stanford's Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences.

  • Erin Gibson

    Erin Gibson

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Glia make up more than half of the cells in the human brain, but we are just beginning to understand the complex and multifactorial role glia play in health and disease. Glia are decidedly dynamic in form and function. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this dynamic nature of glia is imperative to developing novel therapeutic strategies for diseases of the nervous system that involve aberrant gliogenesis, especially related to changes in myelination.

  • Bertil Glader

    Bertil Glader

    Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Endowed Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Hematology/Oncology, biology, and treatment of bone marrow failure disorders, hereditary coagulation disorders-clinical trials.

  • Jeffrey S.  Glenn, M.D., Ph.D.

    Jeffrey S. Glenn, M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Glenn's primary interest is in molecular virology, with a strong emphasis on translating this knowledge into novel antiviral therapies. Other interests include exploitation of hepatic stem cells, engineered human liver tissues, liver cancer, and new biodefense antiviral strategies.

  • Anna L Gloyn

    Anna L Gloyn

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Anna's current research projects are focused on the translation of genetic association signals for type 2 diabetes and glycaemic traits into cellular and molecular mechanisms for beta-cell dysfunction and diabetes. Her group uses a variety of complementary approaches, including human genetics, functional genomics, physiology and islet-biology to dissect out the molecular mechanisms driving disease pathogenesis.

  • Neville H. Golden M.D.

    Neville H. Golden M.D.

    The Marron and Mary Elizabeth Kendrick Professor in Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research has focused on the medical complications of adolescents with eating disorders. My specific area of study has been the etiology and implications of amenorrhea in adolescents with eating disorders, in particular the management of reduced bone mass and osteoporosis in anorexia nervosa.