School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 54 Results

  • Kate Hardy

    Kate Hardy

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Kate Hardy is a California Licensed Psychologist who has specialized in working with individuals with psychosis for over 15 years in both research and clinical settings. Dr. Hardy received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Liverpool, United Kingdom. She has worked in specialist early psychosis services in both the UK and the US, including UCSF’s Prodrome Assessment Research and Treatment (PART) program, where she completed her post-doctoral fellowship, and as Clinical Director for the Prevention and Recovery from Early Psychosis (PREP) program. Dr. Hardy has significant experience in providing CBTp to individuals with early psychosis, and those at risk of developing psychosis, in both individual and group settings and integration of this clinical intervention to broader systems and staff teams. She has led multiple trainings and workshops in CBTp to a wide variety of audiences including community clinicians, psychiatrists, and families, and provides ongoing supervision and consultation in this approach. Dr. Hardy is also involved in the implementation of national strategies to increase dissemination of early psychosis models with the aim of bringing these cutting edge treatments to a broader population.

  • Nancy A. Haug

    Nancy A. Haug

    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Nancy A. Haug, Ph.D. is Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor and Addiction Medicine Fellowship Program Faculty in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She currently leads didactics and a journal club for Addiction Medicine fellows, and supervises a supplemental practicum for doctoral students who are co-facilitating group therapy.

    Dr. Haug is also Professor and Associate Chair of the Department of Psychology at Palo Alto University where she teaches, advises and supervises graduate students, and leads the Harm Reduction and Addiction Treatment Research Laboratory. Dr. Haug previously served as faculty and attending psychologist in the Department of Psychiatry at University of California San Francisco, and taught in the University of California, Berkeley Alcohol & Drug Studies program.

    Dr. Haug was recently funded by SAMHSA for a practitioner-education initiative to expand training for evidence-based addiction treatment. She is active in the Society of Addiction Psychology (American Psychological Association, Division 50) and chairs the Outreach and Dissemination committee. Dr. Haug is on the editorial board of the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs and the Journal of Addictive Diseases. Throughout her academic career, Dr. Haug has focused on behavioral and psychosocial interventions for treating addiction, and currently has projects studying mindfulness group treatment for addiction, cannabis vaping practices and online interventions for alcohol harm reduction. Dr. Haug has been licensed in CA since 2004 and has a private practice which informs her research and teaching.

  • Chris Hayward

    Chris Hayward

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Hayward's research has focused on risk factors for the onset of adolescent internalizing disorders in adolescent girls and the role of early puberty specifically.

  • Alesha Heath

    Alesha Heath

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Bio Dr. Alesha Heath is a Postdoctoral Scholar at Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford School of Medicine and the MIRECC the VA Palo Alto. She earned her PhD from the University of Western Australia and Sorbonne University.

    Dr. Heath's research has been primarily focused on the mechanisms and applications of brain stimulation therapies, in particular repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Her research involves both basic and clinical components with the aim of improving the efficacy of these therapies for the treatment of disorders such as depression and Alzheimer's disease.

  • Claire Hebenstreit

    Claire Hebenstreit

    Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated) [Vapahcs], Psych/General Psychiatry and Psychology (Adult)

    Bio Dr. Hebenstreit received her PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Denver and completed predoctoral internship at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. From 2013-2016 she was a VA Advanced Fellow in Women’s Health Research at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and a research affiliate of the University of California San Francisco. She is an attending psychologist in Inpatient Mental Health at VA Palo Alto, where she provides clinical training and supervision through the Psychology Service as well as the Stanford Psychiatry Residency program. Her research areas have included interpersonal and intimate partner violence against women, emerging health care needs of women veterans within the VA system, and workplace violence prevention. Her clinical interests include severe mental illness and clinical care in inpatient psychiatry.

  • John P. Hegarty II

    John P. Hegarty II

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Bio The overarching goal of my research is to identify neurobiological subgroups and develop objective biomarkers for individuals with psychiatric and neurological disorders in order to improve biologically-based diagnosis and advance the development of precision medicine for mental health. Biologically-based diagnosis and treatment are extremely limited for some psychiatric conditions, especially neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but also critically-needed to increase early identification and improve treatment outcomes. My early career training has focused on developing expertise in non-invasive neuroimaging approaches for examining participants ranging from young children to adults and my research has focused on identifying the neurobiology underlying typical and atypical neurodevelopment.

    Thus far in my early research career, my primary contributions to science fall within four major categories:
    1) identifying the neural correlates of different cognitive and behavioral deficits, 2) investigating the neurobiological substrates of treatment response, 3) examining the etiological factors that contribute to atypical brain development in children with autism, and 4) summarizing and increasing accessibility to autism-related research. My earliest research investigated the neurobiology associated with the cognitive deficits of alexithymia, dyslexia, and stress to further develop theories of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to differences in cognitive and behavioral processing. My subsequent dissertation research, in which I began to focus on neurodevelopmental disorders, examined the neural correlates of treatment response to beta-blockers in adults with ASD and also assessed the contribution of cerebellar circuits to autism-related symptoms, which is well-supported from postmortem studies but understudied in clinical populations. During my postdoctoral training, I have been further developing skills for working with young children with and without neurodevelopmental disorders as well as utilizing advanced neuroimaging and neurophysiological approaches to examine the biological mechanisms underlying different types of cognitive and behavioral symptoms. My most recent research has focused on examining the neural correlates of response to behavioral interventions as well as examining the etiological factors that contribute to atypical brain development in twins with autism. The independent line of research that I will continue to develop in my research lab will aim to improve our understanding of typical and atypical brain development and identify objective biomarkers for advancing precision medicine.

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