School of Medicine


Showing 1-100 of 258 Results

  • Deborah Kado

    Deborah Kado

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Bio Dr. Deborah Kado joined the faculty at Stanford and the Veteran's Association Medical Center, Palo Alto in April 2021 as Chief of Geriatric Research in the Geriatrics Section/Population Health and Primary Care. She completed her undergraduate education at Bryn Mawr College followed by medical school at Cornell University Medical College. Originally from Northern California, she returned back west to complete her medical residency in internal medicine and chief residency at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. From there, she headed to UCSF for her post-doctoral research training in clinical research, followed by a Master’s Degree of Science in Epidemiology at the UCLA School of Public Health sponsored by the John Hartford Foundation, and a clinical fellowship in geriatrics at UCLA. Her primary research focus has been on osteoporosis and the related disorder hyperkyphosis. She has enjoyed continuous funding from the NIH since she started on the UCLA faculty in 2000 and in 2007 defined hyperkyphosis as a new geriatric syndrome, first featured in the Annals of Internal Medicine and later as its own chapter in UpToDate. Prior to coming to Stanford, she was at UC San Diego where she started a dedicated osteoporosis clinic in 2013, and in about 2016, she has broadened her research interests from musculoskeletal aging to study all things aging, including such diverse topics as those involving the gut microbiome in older men and the effects of cancer treatments on aging in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients.

  • David Kahn, M.D.

    David Kahn, M.D.

    Clinical Associate Professor, Surgery - Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cosmetic surgery and the study of changes associated with the aging appearance of the face.

    1. Analysis and development of new procedures for aesthetic surgery of the face
    2. Analysis of the changes the face undergoes with age in the bone and soft tissues
    3. Analysis of techniques for rhinoplasty
    4. Evaluation of optimal techniques for aesthetic and reconstructive breast surgery

  • James Kahn

    James Kahn

    Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My initial research activities involved antiretroviral and novel therapeutic treatments of HIV infection, understanding elements of HIV pathogenesis associated with acute HIV infection and post exposure prevention. My most recent scholarly activities concentrate on working as a team to capitalize on the data stored in electronic medical records, HIV disease modeling and using electronic medical records for outcome research and developing a mentorship program for early career scientists.

  • Pooja Kakar

    Pooja Kakar

    Clinical Instructor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As a breastfeeding medicine physician, I am passionate about advocating for mother-infant dyads and supporting their breastfeeding journeys. Additionally, I am interested studying and addressing disparities in initiation and duration of breastfeeding, particularly in lower-resourced populations, by building and advancing community partnerships.

    I am also interested in the use of digital health tools to advance upstream determinants of health in community-based settings. My current funded research projects include: 1) Providing a telehealth-based, weight control program to children with obesity from lower-income, racial and ethnic minority families (Gardner GOALS) and 2) Assessing and addressing disparities in healthy behaviors in families from under-resourced settings through the use of a secure, multilingual mobile neighborhood app (Our Voice: Beyond Clinic Walls).

  • Agnieszka Kalinowski

    Agnieszka Kalinowski

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio I am a translational physician-scientist focused on studying the role of the immune system in patients with schizophrenia. My work spans careful clinical characterization of patients to understanding mechanisms in basic science model systems, allowing to provide mechanistic understanding to observations in clinical samples. Currently, I'm focused on deciphering the role of the complement system and how the known genetic risk translates into pathophysiological disease mechanisms. I hope that this work will pave the way to novel treatment strategies.

  • Nathan Kalinowski, D.M.D.

    Nathan Kalinowski, D.M.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

    Bio Dr. Nathan Kalinowski is a Hospital Dentist and Clinical Assistant Professor in Dental Medicine and Surgery. He performs medically necessary dental clearance and extractions for patients preparing for cardiac surgery, radiation therapy, or organ transplantation. He also performs surgical treatment of infection and trauma to the teeth and supporting alveolar bone including reconstruction using dental implants.

  • Praveen Kalra

    Praveen Kalra

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Bio Dr. Praveen Kalra is Board Certified in Anesthesia and in Critical Care. Dr Kalra loves all aspects of his specialty. He specializes in trauma, orthopedic, brain and spine surgery, urology, general surgery, plastics, gynecologic, head and neck surgery, and cancer surgery. His professional interests include devising protocols for patient safety, informed consent, reducing the impact of anesthetics on the environment, addressing climate change by reducing green house gas emissions in health care setting, resident education to emphasize evidence based safe care, superior documentation, and mentoring medical students. He has been in practice for over 17 years.

    Dr. Kalra completed his residency in Anesthesia from Harvard Medical School’s Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital and a fellowship in Critical Care from Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore.

    Dr. Kalra was born and raised in India where he received his medical education (1988-94). Before joining medical school he finished his Diploma in Pharmacy from College of Pharmacy, Delhi in 1987. He has also completed residency in Anesthesia in 1998 from King George’s Medical College, Lucknow. Outside of work, Dr Kalra enjoys traveling with his family.

  • Julia Kaltschmidt

    Julia Kaltschmidt

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The lab’s primary research interest is to understand how specific neuronal circuits are established. We use mouse genetics, combinatorial immunochemical labeling and high-resolution laser scanning microscopy to identify, manipulate, and quantitatively analyze synaptic contacts within the complex neuronal milieu of the spinal cord and the enteric nervous system.

  • Afrin N. Kamal MD

    Afrin N. Kamal MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio Afrin Kamal is a board-certified gastroenterologist, who trained at Washington University in internal medicine, Cleveland Clinic in gastroenterology/hepatology, and most recently Stanford University in esophageal and motility diseases. Afrin shares a clinical passion in esophageal motility diseases with an an overlapping interest in health services and outcomes research.

  • Robin Kamal MD MBA

    Robin Kamal MD MBA

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Wrist and Elbow Injuries and Quality Measures in Orthopaedic Surgery

  • Aya Kamaya, MD

    Aya Kamaya, MD

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Hepatobiliary imaging
    Hepatocellular carcinoma
    Urologic imaging
    Gynecologic imaging
    Thyroid imaging
    Novel ultrasound technologies
    Perfusion CT imaging of abdominal tumors

  • Neeraja Kambham

    Neeraja Kambham

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Kambham's research interests primarily involve medical diseases and transplantation pathology of the kidney and liver.

  • Komal Kamra

    Komal Kamra

    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pediatric Cardiac Anesthesia
    Transesophageal Echocardiography
    Adult Congenital Heart Disease
    Clinical Informatics

  • Kathleen Kan

    Kathleen Kan

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Urology

    Bio Dr. Kathleen Kan is a fellowship-trained pediatric urologist with a clinical practice based at LPCH and additional outreach programs in the South Bay. Her current practice includes general, endoscopic and complex reconstructive procedures and a clinical counseling interest in kidney stone disease and differences in sexual differentiation. She currently serves as the Associate Program Director of the Urology residency program.

    Her current research is focused on understanding why health elementary schoolchildren develop new bladder and bowel problems.

  • Matthew Kanan

    Matthew Kanan

    Associate Professor of Chemistry and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Bio Associate Professor of Chemistry Matthew Kanan develops new catalysts and chemical reactions for applications in renewable energy conversion and CO2 utilization. His group at Stanford University has recently developed a novel method to create plastic from carbon dioxide and inedible plant material rather than petroleum products, and pioneered the study of “defect-rich” heterogeneous electro-catalysts for converting carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide to liquid fuel.

    Matthew Kanan completed undergraduate study in chemistry at Rice University (B.A. 2000 Summa Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa). During doctoral research in organic chemistry at Harvard University (Ph.D. 2005), he developed a novel method for using DNA to discover new chemical reactions. He then moved into inorganic chemistry for his postdoctoral studies as a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he discovered a water oxidation catalyst that operates in neutral water. He joined the Stanford Chemistry Department faculty in 2009 to continue research into energy-related catalysis and reactions. His research and teaching have already been recognized in selection as one of Chemistry & Engineering News’ first annual Talented 12, the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, Eli Lilly New Faculty Award, and recognition as a Camille and Henry Dreyfus Environmental Mentor, among other honors.

    The Kanan Lab addresses fundamental challenges in catalysis and synthesis with an emphasis on enabling new technologies for scalable CO2 utilization. The interdisciplinary effort spans organic synthesis, materials chemistry and electrochemistry.

    One of the greatest challenges of the 21st century is to transition to an energy economy with ultra-low greenhouse gas emissions without compromising quality of life for a growing population. The Kanan Lab aims to help enable this transition by developing catalysts and chemical reactions that recycle CO2 into fuels and commodity chemicals using renewable energy sources. To be implemented on a substantial scale, these methods must ultimately be competitive with fossil fuels and petrochemicals. With this requirement in mind, the group focuses on the fundamental chemical challenge of making carbon–carbon (C–C) bonds because multi-carbon compounds have higher energy density, greater value, and more diverse applications that one-carbon compounds. Both electrochemical and chemical methods are being pursued. For electrochemical conversion, the group studies how defects known as grain boundaries can be exploited to improve CO2/CO electro-reduction catalysis. Recent work has unveiled quantitative correlations between grain boundaries and catalytic activity, establishing a new design principle for electrocatalysis, and developed grain boundary-rich copper catalysts with unparalleled activity for converting carbon monoxide to liquid fuel. For chemical CO2 conversion, the group is developing C–H carboxylation and CO2 hydrogenation reactions that are promoted by simple carbonate salts. These reactions provide a way to make C–C bonds between un-activated substrates and CO2 without resorting to energy-intensive and hazardous reagents. Among numerous applications, carbonate-promoted carboxylation enables the synthesis of a monomer used to make polyester plastic from CO2 and a feedstock derived from agricultural waste.

    In addition to CO2 chemistry, the Kanan group is pursuing new strategies to control selectivity in molecular catalysis for fine chemical synthesis. Of particular interest in the use of electrostatic interactions to discriminate between competing reaction pathways based on their charge distributions. This effort uses ion pairing or interfaces to control the local electrostatic environment in which a reaction takes place. The group has recently shown that local electric fields can control regioselectivity in isomerization reactions catalyzed by gold complexes.

  • Beverley Kane

    Beverley Kane

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Beverley Kane, MD, was Board Certified in Family Medicine, then completed fellowships in Ob-Gyn (San Francisco Children's Hosptial) and Sports Medicine (London Univeristy). She has worked in the private practice of sports medicine; in medical informatics, specializing in doctor-patient communication (WebMD); and in stress management with her private practice, Horsensei Equine-Assisted Learning & THerapy (HEALTH). Her latest book, "Equine-imity--Stress Reduction and Emotional Self-Regulation in the Company of Horses," published 27 March 2021, can be seen at http://equine-imity.com/

  • Guson Kang, MD

    Guson Kang, MD

    Member, Cardiovascular Institute

    Bio Dr. Kang is an interventional cardiologist who specializes in the treatment of structural heart disease. He has expertise in complex coronary interventions, transcatheter aortic and mitral valve replacements, transcatheter mitral valve repair, left atrial appendage occlusion, PFO/septal defect closure, alcohol septal ablation, and paravalvular leak closure.

    A Bay Area native, he graduated from Stanford University and obtained his medical degree at Yale University. He came back to Stanford to train in internal medicine, cardiology, and interventional cardiology before completing an advanced structural interventions fellowship at Ford Hospital.

  • Chia Sui Kao

    Chia Sui Kao

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genitourinary tumors with a special interest in Testicular tumors

  • Ming Jeffrey Kao, PhD, MD

    Ming Jeffrey Kao, PhD, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Patient-reported outcomes. Efficient, multi-feature item-response theory (IRT) based computerized adaptive testing (CAT) algorithm using item banks from PROMIS and NIH Toolbox

    2. Activity monitoring. Novel analytic framework for physical activity monitoring in the context of pain.

    3. Operations research. Multi-variable discrete and continuous optimization for Lean Hospital Management

    4. National trends in pain medication prescription

  • Peter Kao

    Peter Kao

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research program has several active projects:
    1.) Pulmonary Vascular Disease – Simvastatin reversed experimental pulmonary hypertension, and is safe for treatment of patients. Blinded clinical trials of efficacy are in progress.
    2.) Lung inflammation and regeneration (stem cells)
    3.) Lung surfactant rheology and oxidative stress
    4.) Gene regulation by RNA binding proteins, NF45 and NF90 through transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms

  • Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD

    Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor (Research) of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Michael S. Kapiloff is a faculty member in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and a member of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. Although Dr. Kapiloff was at one time a Board-Certified General Pediatrician, he is currently involved in full-time basic science and translational research. His laboratory studies the basic molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the retinal ganglion cell and cardiac myocyte to disease. The longstanding interest of his laboratory is the role in intracellular signal transduction of multimolecular complexes organized by scaffold proteins. Recently, his lab has also been involved in the translation of these concepts into new therapies, including the development of new AAV gene therapy biologics for the prevention and treatment of heart failure and for neuroprotection in the eye.

    URL to NCBI listing of all published works:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/michael.kapiloff.1/bibliography/40252285/public/?sort=date&direction=descending

    For more information see Dr. Kapiloff's lab website: http://med.stanford.edu/kapilofflab.html

  • Katherine Kaplan

    Katherine Kaplan

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Kaplan's research interests span four (often overlapping) domains: (1) pathophysiologic aspects of insomnia and hypersomnia in mood disorders, including mechanisms, correlates, and sequelae of these sleep disturbances; (2) behavioral interventions for sleep disturbances in adults and adolescents; (3) circadian and psychosocial factors impacting sleep in adolescence; and (4) machine learning approaches to big data.

  • Michael J. Kaplan, MD

    Michael J. Kaplan, MD

    Professor of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1) New therapeutic approaches for head and neck cancer, including immune stimulation possibilities (IRX-2 protocol), integration of biological modifiers, and, eventually, genetic approaches.
    2) Head and neck cancer stem cells: identification, characterization, control--in conjunction with the Irv Weissman and Michael Clarke labs in the Stem Cell Institute
    3) Development of innovative surgical methods at the anterior cranial base

  • Robert Kaplan

    Robert Kaplan

    Adjunct Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Health services research
    Studies on the cost and quality of health care
    Health outcome measurement
    Social determinants of health

  • Daniel Kapp

    Daniel Kapp

    Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Gynecologic malignancies; Rectal/and cancer; Breast Cancer; Hodgkin's disease; Hyperthermia; intraoperative radiation therapy; High dose rate radiation therapy; Predictive assays; Patterns of tumor spread; Health care finance.

  • Shanthi Kappagoda

    Shanthi Kappagoda

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Completed a Masters degree in Health Services Research in 2012. Research focused on using network models to develop a clinical research agenda for neglected tropical diseases.

  • Cynthia Kapphahn

    Cynthia Kapphahn

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Adolescent Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Access to health care services for adolescents.
    Confidentiality.
    Mental Health Financing.
    Eating disorders.

  • Ioannis Karakikes

    Ioannis Karakikes

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Karakikes Lab aims to uncover fundamental new insights into the molecular mechanisms and functional consequences of pathogenic mutations associated with familial cardiovascular diseases.

  • Amer Karam

    Amer Karam

    Clinical Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Gynecologic Oncology

    Bio Dr. Amer Karam attended medical school at the American University in Beirut. He completed his internship and residency at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, a fellowship in gynecologic oncology at the University of California Los Angeles and a fellowship in breast surgery at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Karam has a vested interest in minimally invasive and robotic surgery with a practice centered on this approach for the treatment of patients with gynecologic malignancy and complicated pelvic surgery. He is currently a clinical professor at the Stanford Hospital and Clinics and Director of Robotic Surgery and Outreach in the Division of Gynecologic Oncology

  • Mardi Karin, MD, FACS

    Mardi Karin, MD, FACS

    Clinical Associate Professor, Surgery - General Surgery

    Bio Dr. Mardi R. Karin is a board certified surgeon with over 20 years of experience and the clinical director of breast cancer care at Stanford Cancer Center South Bay. Dr. Karin specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of breast diseases and cancer. Her focus and leadership in breast cancer care includes improving coordinated care for breast cancer treatment, developing optimal survivorship plans, and extensive experience in building strong relationships with community physicians. Dr. Karin has extensive experience in a wide variety of general surgery procedures and all types of breast surgery, including breast conservation treatment. In addition, Dr. Karin is well experienced in complex breast cancer skin and nipple sparing procedures in coordination with the plastic surgeon for immediate breast reconstruction and optimal appearance with excellent outcomes.

  • Karthikeshwar Kasirajan (Kasi)

    Karthikeshwar Kasirajan (Kasi)

    Clinical Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    Bio Dr. Kasirajan is a board-certified, fellowship-trained vascular surgeon. Also known as Dr. Kasi, he is a clinical professor of vascular surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Kasirajan preserves limbs, facilitates access to dialysis, and helps his patients manage conditions such as aneurysms, varicose veins, thoracic outlet syndrome, and deep vein thrombosis. Many of his limb preservation patients smoke, have diabetes, or are experiencing renal failure. Dr. Kasirajan’s experience also centers around the treatment of aneurysms and prevention of strokes.

    In all cases, his goal is to provide either noninvasive or minimally invasive management whenever possible. He performs open surgery only when it is the best option. Dr. Kasirajan treats many patients with stents and stent grafts, which can shorten hospital stays and recovery times.

    Dr. Kasirajan (Kasi) receives referrals of patients from primary care physicians, nephrologists, podiatrists, cardiologists, woundcare specialists, diabetologists, neurologists, and other specialists. He welcomes referrals as early as possible, ideally before patients become symptomatic. A strong proponent of doing early screening for peripheral artery disease, Dr. Kasirajan advocates for the use of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) in routine physical examinations. When providers detect an imbalance between leg and arm blood pressure, Dr. Kasirajan can help create customized strategies to address the cause before the problem worsens.

    In addition to offering excellent vascular care to the community, Dr. Kasirajan joined Stanford to continue pursuing his research interests. He has conducted research into advances in minimally invasive procedures for stroke prevention and for aneurysm management. His research has also focused on how to improve surgery outcomes to help patients suffering from peripheral vascular disease. Dr. Kasirajan has been the investigator in over 40 multicenter studies involving new stent graphs, thrombectomy catheters, and other advances in endovascular technology.

    Dr. Kasirajan has made more than 100 presentations worldwide on minimally invasive vascular surgery techniques and preventive care in the vascular patient. He has spoken at multiple conferences including the Society for Vascular Surgery, Peripheral Vascular Society, and the South Asian American Vascular Society. He has earned numerous honors for his academic achievements, including the prestigious Alpha Omega Alpha award for medical student and resident education.

    As the author of more than 120 journal articles, Dr. Kasirajan’s work has appeared in the Journal of Vascular Surgery, Endovascular Today, Pharmacogenomics Journal, Catheter Cardiovascular Intervention, and many other publications. He also has authored 20 book chapters in textbooks including Medical Management of the Surgical Patient 5th Edition, Advances in Phlebology and Venus Surgery Volume 1, Current Therapy in Vascular Surgery, Mastery of Surgery, and many more.

    Dr. Kasirajan has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Endovascular Therapy, Annals of Vascular Surgery, International Journal of Angiology, and other publications.

  • Maya M. Kasowski

    Maya M. Kasowski

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Sean N Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research) of Pathology and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Bio I am a clinical pathologist and assistant professor in the Departments of Medicine, Pathology, and Genetics (by courtesy) at Stanford. I completed my MD-PhD training at Yale University and my residency training and a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Genetics at Stanford University. My experiences as a clinical pathologist and genome scientist have made me passionate about applying cutting-edge technologies to primary patient specimens in order to characterize disease pathologies at the molecular level. The core focus of my lab is to study the mechanisms by which genetic variants influence the risk of disease through effects on intermediate molecular phenotypes.

  • Laura B. Kasper, PhD

    Laura B. Kasper, PhD

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio I am psychologist and have been practicing psychotherapy for over 18 years. I have experience working with a diverse group of clients with respect to presenting concerns, gender, sexual orientation, and race/ethnicity.

    Regardless of their background, the majority of my clients are highly intelligent and accomplished people who are interested in taking their personal and professional relationships to the next level, starting with themselves. My therapeutic approach blends my first-hand experience of the high-performing professional workplace with buddhist psychology and tools to offer support that is unrelentingly compassionate, direct, and powerful.

    I have particular research and clinical expertise in authenticity with one's self and in relationships, interpersonal communication, and issues of sexual orientation, gender, and sexuality. My services include individual, couples, and group psychotherapy. I also do video counseling sessions with individuals and couples in CA, DC and VA, the places where I am licensed.

    I earned my master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Maryland’s Counseling Psychology program. I completed my internship and post-doctoral training, and was a Staff Psychologist at the The George Washington University Counseling Center for several years before starting my private practice. I am currently in the Interpersonal Dynamics Facilitator Training Program at Stanford University in the Graduate School of Business to become a small group facilitator for their popular elective, Interpersonal Dynamics.

    I have been practicing Vipassana meditation for over fifteen years. I’ve spent eighty-five days on silent meditation retreats in that time, and have a mindfulness orientation to my work.

    I am a member of the American Group Psychotherapy Association and the Northern California Group Psychotherapy Society, and the Northern California Society for Psychoanalytic Psychology. I am licensed and insured in California (PSY28532), Washington D.C. (PSY1000362) and Virginia (PSY0810004715).

  • Michele Kastelein

    Michele Kastelein

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Vaden Health Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests At Stanford University School of Medicine, one of our major goals is to translate research insights into practical advances that enhance and prolong life. We foster a two-way transfer of knowledge between research laboratories and patient-care settings. Our faculty, staff, postdoctoral scholars and students engage in interdisciplinary efforts to turn this knowledge into therapies that treat or prevent disease.

  • Tamiko Katsumoto

    Tamiko Katsumoto

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Bio Tamiko Katsumoto, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University. She earned her MD from the University of California, San Francisco. She completed her internal medicine residency and rheumatology fellowship at UCSF, including a postdoc in the immunology lab of Dr. Arthur Weiss. Dr. Katsumoto’s research interests include the discovery of novel biomarkers to predict the development of immune-related adverse events in cancer patients on immune checkpoint inhibitor therapies, and optimizing the management of such complications. She serves as the director of the Stanford Immune Related Toxicity Working Group, a multidisciplinary group which aims to improve the quality of care of patients on checkpoint inhibitors. She is fascinated by the relationship between cancer and autoimmune diseases such as scleroderma and dermatomyositis, and the paraneoplastic manifestations of various cancers. She has spent time at Genentech, where she led several clinical trials in immunology.

  • Maya Katz, MD

    Maya Katz, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Katz is a board-certified neurologist who specializes in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders. She is also a clinical associate professor of neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    In her clinical practice, she develops a comprehensive, compassionate treatment plan for every patient in her care. She excels at deep brain stimulation, neuromodulation, and other advanced treatment approaches. She also works closely with each patient’s caregivers and family members to help ensure optimal well-being and quality of life for all involved in the management of Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Lewy body dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, and other conditions.

    Her research activities include serving as a co-investigator of the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative funded by the Michael J. Fox Foundation. She is a site principal investigator for a National Institutes of Health-funded study of the application of palliative care to Parkinson’s disease. Previously, she was a co-investigator for studies of remote access to care for Parkinson’s disease and patient-centered outcomes in Parkinson’s disease, both funded by the National Parkinson Foundation.

    Dr. Katz has earned many honors, including the ”Advancing Parkinson’s Therapies” conference award from the Parkinson’s Foundation and the “Fostering New Directions in Research” award from the Movement Disorders Society. She won scholarships from Weill Cornell Medical College, the Joseph Collins Foundation, and Anna E. Ray Robinson Education Fund.

    She has presented her research findings at global meetings such as the International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society and the International Palliative Care Society. She also has made presentations at national meetings of the American Academy of Neurology as well as regional conferences.

    She has authored numerous articles on the topics of outpatient palliative care for Parkinson’s disease, caregiver burden in Parkinson’s disease, virtual visits for Parkinson’s disease, and diagnosis of cervical dystonia. Her work has appeared in journals including Neurology, Annals of Palliative Medicine, Contemporary Clinical Trials, Movement Disorders Clinical Practice, and Neurotherapeutics.

    In addition, she is a reviewer for JAMA Neurology, the Journal of Neurological Sciences, Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, the brain imaging and stimulation section of Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, and Parkinsonism and Related
    Disorders.

    Dr. Katz is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society, Parkinson’s Foundation, Parkinson’s Study Group, American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, and American Telemedicine Association. She also is an invited speaker at community support groups for people with Parkinson’s disease.

  • Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Katznelson is an internationally known neuroendocrinologist and clinical researcher, with research expertise in the diagnosis and management of hypopituitarism, the effects of hormones on neurocognitive function, and the development of therapeutics for acromegaly and Cushing’s syndrome, and neuroendocrine tumors. Dr. Katznelson is the medical director of the multidisciplinary Stanford Pituitary Center, a program geared for patient management, clinical research and patient education

  • Maninder P. Kaur, MD

    Maninder P. Kaur, MD

    Clinical Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Kaur is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist subspecializing in onco-neurology and vascular neurology. She is a clinical instructor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Kaur’s clinical interests include vascular neurology; neuro-oncology, with emphasis in primary and metastatic brain and spinal tumor; and complications of brain cancer and chemotherapy, including impacts on the vascular system. She has earned transcranial Doppler certification and is a registered vascular technologist. She is passionate about caring for underserved populations.

    As a clinical researcher, Dr. Kaur has explored innovations in neuro-oncological treatment modalities, including the combined use of multiple novel medication therapies with radiation for glioblastoma. She has also studied advances in endovascular treatment of pseudotumor cerebri.

    Dr. Kaur has written about alveolar hemorrhage in conjunction with lupus for the peer-reviewed journal Case Reports in Medicine. In addition, she co-authored the book chapter on neuro-oncology in Synopsis of Neurological and Psychiatric Complications of Systemic Disease. She also authored the book chapter “Brain Edema and Corticosteroid Toxicity” in Brain Tumors: A Pocket Guide.

    Dr. Kaur has delivered presentations on topics such as the role of transcranial Doppler in predicting CAR-T cell-induced encephalopathy. She has also given a series of presentations on treatment methods for vasospasms while at the JFK-Hackensack Medical Center in Seton Hall University. Among her honors and awards, Dr. Kaur has won recognition for a poster presentation on stroke management at the Neuroimaging Conference.

    Dr. Kaur is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, Society for Neuro-Oncology, and American Society of Neuroimaging.

  • Makoto Kawai

    Makoto Kawai

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine

    Bio I am a physician scientist in the field of sleep medicine in aging and brain function. Using combined polysomnogram and novel neuroimaging technology, I aim to identify potential sleep biomarkers to investigate the mechanism of progression from normal aging to Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) or dementia. I also investigate the impact of sleep on cognitive/affective function or behavior abnormality in various neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders.

  • Masataka Kawana

    Masataka Kawana

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Dr. Kawana joined the Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiology group in 2018 as an Instructor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. He completed his internal medicine, cardiovascular medicine, and heart failure training at Stanford. He also completed a postdoctoral research fellowship under Dr. James Spudich in the Department of Biochemistry. He sees advanced heart failure patients in the clinic and attends CCU/heart failure service, and post-heart transplant and MCS service. His research interests are in the fundamental mechanism of inherited cardiomyopathies, and he studies the effect of gene mutation on the cardiac sarcomere function using cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical approaches, which would lead to the development of novel pharmacotherapy that directly modulates cardiac muscle protein. He is involved in multiple clinical trials for pharmacotherapy in inherited cardiomyopathy and also conducting a device study in heart failure.

  • Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Dennis Farrey Family Professor of Pediatrics, and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D. Director of the Program in Human Gene Therapy and Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Genetics. Respected worldwide for his work in gene therapy for hemophilia, Dr. Kay and his laboratory focus on establishing the scientific principles and developing the technologies needed for achieving persistent and therapeutic levels of gene expression in vivo. The major disease models are hemophilia, hepatitis C, and hepatitis B viral infections.

  • Debra Lee Kaysen

    Debra Lee Kaysen

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health & Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Much of my current research focus is on the development of testing of accessible, scaleable, and effective treatments for trauma-related disorders and related comorbidities (e.g. substance use disorders, HIV, mood disorders). This work has focused on addressing trauma-related disorders especially in underserved populations and settings. This includes research in rural communities, with Native American communities, and with sexual minorities. My research has had a strong impact on building an evidence base on adaptations of psychotherapies for PTSD and substance use disorders for diverse populations both within and outside the United States. Our findings demonstrate that complex cognitive behavioral psychotherapies like Cognitive Processing Therapy can be culturally adapted and delivered in challenging settings (conflict settings, high poverty environments) with significant and lasting change in PTSD, depression, and functioning. This has led to work adapting CPT for diverse populations within the United States (rural Native Americans, urban Latinos) and outside of it (Iraq, DRC). Other research has focused on treatment for PTSD/SUD. My research has also found support for the use of brief telehealth interventions to build treatment engagement and to reduce drinking among trauma-exposed populations. In addition, my work has been critical in testing the feasibility of novel trauma-focused interventions for use by those with PTSD and SUD, thus paving the road for more rigorous research studies.

    Current PI'ed research studies include: 1) developing and evaluating a brief motivational interviewing intervention designed to increase treatment-seeking among military personnel with untreated PTSD; a two-arm randomized comparative effectiveness trial to evaluate prevention of HIV/STI sexual risk behavior by addressing PTSD through Narrative Exposure Therapy or substance use through Motivational Interviewing among Native American men and women with PTSD; and 3) a comparison of outcomes among patients randomized to initially receive pharmacotherapy or Written Exposure Therapy delivered in primary care as well as comparing outcomes among patients randomized to treatment sequences (i.e., switching and augmenting) for patients who do not respond to the initial treatment.

  • Electron Kebebew, MD, FACS

    Electron Kebebew, MD, FACS

    Harry A. Oberhelman, Jr. and Mark L. Welton Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Kebebew’s translational and clinical investigations have three main scientific goals: 1) to develop effective therapies for fatal, rare and neglected endocrine cancers, 2) to identify new methods, strategies and technologies for improving the diagnosis and treatment of endocrine neoplasms and the prognostication of endocrine cancers, and 3) to develop methods for precision treatment of endocrine tumors.

  • Corey Keller, MD, PhD

    Corey Keller, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goal of my lab is to understand the fundamental principles of human brain plasticity and build trans-diagnostic real-time monitoring platforms for personalized neurotherapeutics.

    We use an array of neuroscience methods to better understand the basic principles of how to create change in brain circuits. We use this knowledge to develop more effective treatment strategies for depression and other psychiatric disorders.

  • Jennifer Keller

    Jennifer Keller

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests interpersonal violence and abuse prevention; empowerment of women; cognitive and affective information processing in depression; clinical, biological, and neuropsychological aspects of depression; South Asian mental health

  • Richard Kempson

    Richard Kempson

    Professor of Pathology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinicopathologic studies in endometrial carcinoma, ovarian neoplasms, and soft tissue tumors.

  • Joan Kendig

    Joan Kendig

    Professor of Biology in the Department of Anesthesia, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory tries to find out how pharmacologic agents used in the practice of anesthesia (general anesthetic and analgesic agents) lead to therapeutically desireable endpoints including unconsciousness, immobility and absence of pain. The old idea that general anesthetics are uniformly non-specific "membrane stabilizers" is giving way to a new realization that these agents exert specific actions on particular ion channels and intracellular signalling systems.

  • John Kerner

    John Kerner

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in pediatric nutritional support and have experience evaluating new enteral and parenteral products especially for the neonate (I studied a "new" I.V. fat product for Abbott; I participated in a multicenter trial of a formula with fish oil in it for neonates with Mead Johnson and a multicenter trial of a new human milk fortifier for Wyeth).

  • Terence Ketter

    Terence Ketter

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Psychopharmacology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The use of brain imaging methods for understanding the neurobiology of mood disorders and to target treatments for patients with bipolar disorders. Research in the use of novel medications and combinations of medications in the treatment of bipolar disorders. Research on the development and course of bipolar disorder in late adolescence and young adulthood, particularly in college students, and links between creativity, temperament, and mood disorders.

  • Kian Keyashian

    Kian Keyashian

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio The management of inflammatory bowel disease continues to evolve, with the introduction of biologic and small molecule therapies and new goals of treatment, with an emphasis on healing the bowel. My career goal since my graduation from IBD fellowship in 2012 has been to improve the outcomes and quality of life of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In line with these goals, my research has focused investigating new noninvasive diagnostic test, finding factors early in the disease course that might predict a more aggressive disease course and need for different therapies, and investigating new promising effective medications with less side effects.

  • Ali Raza Khaki, MD

    Ali Raza Khaki, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    Bio Dr. Khaki is a hematologist/oncologist with board certification in oncology, hematology, and internal medicine. He is also a clinical assistant professor of oncology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    In his clinical practice, he treats patients all forms of genitourinary cancer, including kidney, bladder, prostate, and testicular. With each patient, he is devoted to providing exceptional, humanistic care. As a medical student, he was named to the national Gold Humanism Honor Society. As a resident, he received the Reza Gandjei Humanism Award.

    His research interests include novel therapies for genitourinary cancers, with a focus on urothelial cancer outcomes. He also has studied health care utilization and costs for end-of-life care of cancer patients.

    Dr. Khaki has earned honors and recognition from the American Association for Cancer Research, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, Conquer Cancer Foundation, and other organizations.

    He has authored numerous articles on topics such as immunotherapy for urothelial cancer, management of cancer patients with COVID-19, and utilization of end-of-life care by cancer patients. His work has appeared in publications including JAMA Oncology, Cancer Investigation, Clinical Genitourinary Cancer, the Journal of Urology, and Lancet. In addition, he is an editor for HemOnc.org and theMednet, the physician-only online community where members share clinical questions and answers.

    Dr. Khaki is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society of Hematology, Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, and American Medical Informatics Association. He is on the Measure Steering Group committee and the Trainee and Early Career Council committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  • Christina Khan, MD, PhD

    Christina Khan, MD, PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Christina Khan is a child, adolescent, and adult psychiatrist. She specializes in the treatment of trauma, depression, anxiety, gender and sexuality issues, and physician wellness. Dr. Khan has a special interest in treating vulnerable and under-resourced populations in the United States and abroad.

  • Michelle Joanne Khan (she/her)

    Michelle Joanne Khan (she/her)

    Clinical Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - General

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Khan's research focuses on prevention of HPV-related cancers of the cervix, vagina, vulva, and anus and on the impact of reproductive tract infections on pregnancy and health.

  • Saad A. Khan, MD

    Saad A. Khan, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Bio Saad A. Khan, MD is a medical oncologist focused on the treatment of head and neck, thyroid and lung cancers. His research interests include therapeutic clinical trials as well as mechanisms of reducing toxicities that patients experience. His research activities include ongoing clinical trials of targeted and immune therapy in aggressive thyroid malignancies. He is a member of the NRG Head and Neck Committee, the ECOG Head and Neck Core and Thoracic Committees and the National Cancer Institute’s Head and Neck Steering Committee Rare Tumor Task Force.

    When not in clinic or the hospital he enjoys spending time with his family and 3 children, hiking and sitting on the beach.

  • Abha Khandelwal

    Abha Khandelwal

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiovascular disease in Pregnancy
    Valvular Heart Disease
    Cardiomyopathy
    Pericardial disease
    Heart Disease in South Asians
    Women's Cardiovascular Disease

Latest information on COVID-19