School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 63 Results

  • Deborah Kado

    Deborah Kado

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Bio Dr. Deborah Kado joined the faculty at Stanford and the Veteran's Association Medical Center, Palo Alto in April 2021 as Chief of Geriatric Research in the Geriatrics Section/Population Health and Primary Care. She completed her undergraduate education at Bryn Mawr College followed by medical school at Cornell University Medical College. Originally from Northern California, she returned back west to complete her medical residency in internal medicine and chief residency at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. From there, she headed to UCSF for her post-doctoral research training in clinical research, followed by a Master’s Degree of Science in Epidemiology at the UCLA School of Public Health sponsored by the John Hartford Foundation, and a clinical fellowship in geriatrics at UCLA. Her primary research focus has been on osteoporosis and the related disorder hyperkyphosis. She has enjoyed continuous funding from the NIH since she started on the UCLA faculty in 2000 and in 2007 defined hyperkyphosis as a new geriatric syndrome, first featured in the Annals of Internal Medicine and later as its own chapter in UpToDate. Prior to coming to Stanford, she was at UC San Diego where she started a dedicated osteoporosis clinic in 2013, and in about 2016, she has broadened her research interests from musculoskeletal aging to study all things aging, including such diverse topics as those involving the gut microbiome in older men and the effects of cancer treatments on aging in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients.

  • James Kahn

    James Kahn

    Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My initial research activities involved antiretroviral and novel therapeutic treatments of HIV infection, understanding elements of HIV pathogenesis associated with acute HIV infection and post exposure prevention. My most recent scholarly activities concentrate on working as a team to capitalize on the data stored in electronic medical records, HIV disease modeling and using electronic medical records for outcome research and developing a mentorship program for early career scientists.

  • Afrin N. Kamal MD

    Afrin N. Kamal MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio Afrin Kamal is a board-certified gastroenterologist, who trained at Washington University in internal medicine, Cleveland Clinic in gastroenterology/hepatology, and most recently Stanford University in esophageal and motility diseases. Afrin shares a clinical passion in esophageal motility diseases with an an overlapping interest in health services and outcomes research.

  • Beverley Kane

    Beverley Kane

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Beverley Kane, MD, was Board Certified in Family Medicine, then completed fellowships in Ob-Gyn (San Francisco Children's Hosptial) and Sports Medicine (London Univeristy). She has worked in the private practice of sports medicine; in medical informatics, specializing in doctor-patient communication (WebMD); and in stress management with her private practice, Horsensei Equine-Assisted Learning & THerapy (HEALTH). Her latest book, "Equine-imity--Stress Reduction and Emotional Self-Regulation in the Company of Horses," published 27 March 2021, can be seen at http://equine-imity.com/

  • Peter Kao

    Peter Kao

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research program has several active projects:
    1.) Pulmonary Vascular Disease – Simvastatin reversed experimental pulmonary hypertension, and is safe for treatment of patients. Blinded clinical trials of efficacy are in progress.
    2.) Lung inflammation and regeneration (stem cells)
    3.) Lung surfactant rheology and oxidative stress
    4.) Gene regulation by RNA binding proteins, NF45 and NF90 through transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms

  • Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD

    Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor (Research) of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Michael S. Kapiloff is a faculty member in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and a member of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. Although Dr. Kapiloff was at one time a Board-Certified General Pediatrician, he is currently involved in full-time basic science and translational research. His laboratory studies the basic molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the retinal ganglion cell and cardiac myocyte to disease. The longstanding interest of his laboratory is the role in intracellular signal transduction of multimolecular complexes organized by scaffold proteins. Recently, his lab has also been involved in the translation of these concepts into new therapies, including the development of new AAV gene therapy biologics for the prevention and treatment of heart failure and for neuroprotection in the eye.

    URL to NCBI listing of all published works:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/michael.kapiloff.1/bibliography/40252285/public/?sort=date&direction=descending

    For more information see Dr. Kapiloff's lab website: http://med.stanford.edu/kapilofflab.html

  • Robert Kaplan

    Robert Kaplan

    Adjunct Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Health services research
    Studies on the cost and quality of health care
    Health outcome measurement
    Social determinants of health

  • Shanthi Kappagoda

    Shanthi Kappagoda

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Completed a Masters degree in Health Services Research in 2012. Research focused on using network models to develop a clinical research agenda for neglected tropical diseases.

  • Maya M. Kasowski

    Maya M. Kasowski

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Sean N Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research) of Pathology and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Bio I am a clinical pathologist and assistant professor in the Departments of Medicine, Pathology, and Genetics (by courtesy) at Stanford. I completed my MD-PhD training at Yale University and my residency training and a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Genetics at Stanford University. My experiences as a clinical pathologist and genome scientist have made me passionate about applying cutting-edge technologies to primary patient specimens in order to characterize disease pathologies at the molecular level. The core focus of my lab is to study the mechanisms by which genetic variants influence the risk of disease through effects on intermediate molecular phenotypes.

  • Michele Kastelein

    Michele Kastelein

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Vaden Health Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests At Stanford University School of Medicine, one of our major goals is to translate research insights into practical advances that enhance and prolong life. We foster a two-way transfer of knowledge between research laboratories and patient-care settings. Our faculty, staff, postdoctoral scholars and students engage in interdisciplinary efforts to turn this knowledge into therapies that treat or prevent disease.

  • Tamiko Katsumoto

    Tamiko Katsumoto

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Bio Tamiko Katsumoto, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University. She earned her MD from the University of California, San Francisco. She completed her internal medicine residency and rheumatology fellowship at UCSF, including a postdoc in the immunology lab of Dr. Arthur Weiss. Dr. Katsumoto’s research interests include the discovery of novel biomarkers to predict the development of immune-related adverse events in cancer patients on immune checkpoint inhibitor therapies, and optimizing the management of such complications. She serves as the director of the Stanford Immune Related Toxicity Working Group, a multidisciplinary group which aims to improve the quality of care of patients on checkpoint inhibitors. She is fascinated by the relationship between cancer and autoimmune diseases such as scleroderma and dermatomyositis, and the paraneoplastic manifestations of various cancers. She has spent time at Genentech, where she led several clinical trials in immunology.

  • Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Katznelson is an internationally known neuroendocrinologist and clinical researcher, with research expertise in the diagnosis and management of hypopituitarism, the effects of hormones on neurocognitive function, and the development of therapeutics for acromegaly and Cushing’s syndrome, and neuroendocrine tumors. Dr. Katznelson is the medical director of the multidisciplinary Stanford Pituitary Center, a program geared for patient management, clinical research and patient education

  • Masataka Kawana

    Masataka Kawana

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Dr. Kawana joined the Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiology group in 2018 as an Instructor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. He completed his internal medicine, cardiovascular medicine, and heart failure training at Stanford. He also completed a postdoctoral research fellowship under Dr. James Spudich in the Department of Biochemistry. He sees advanced heart failure patients in the clinic and attends CCU/heart failure service, and post-heart transplant and MCS service. His research interests are in the fundamental mechanism of inherited cardiomyopathies, and he studies the effect of gene mutation on the cardiac sarcomere function using cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical approaches, which would lead to the development of novel pharmacotherapy that directly modulates cardiac muscle protein. He is involved in multiple clinical trials for pharmacotherapy in inherited cardiomyopathy and also conducting a device study in heart failure.

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