School of Medicine


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  • Marlene Rabinovitch

    Marlene Rabinovitch

    Dwight and Vera Dunlevie Professor in Pediatric Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research program seeks to identify the cellular and molecular programs regulating vascular and lung development, through the use of cultured cells and tissues and mouse and rat models. We then determine how these programs are perturbed by genetic abnormalities or injurious processes associated with disease, focusing on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a fatal complication in children with heart defects, and a condition of unknown etiology primarily in young women.

  • Ralph Rabkin

    Ralph Rabkin

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr Rabkin is examining the mechanism of the acquired resistance to hormones that develops in kidney failure.In particular he is studying the impact of kidney failure on the action of growth hormone and the role of impaired signal transduction as a cause of growth hormone resistance. He is also engaged in the study of growth factors in diabetic kidney disease.

  • Thomas Raffin

    Thomas Raffin

    The Colleen and Robert Haas Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Raffin is a clinician, teacher and investigator. He retired as Chief of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine in 2004. His key areas of academic interest include the biology and management of acute lung injury; basic biology of human lung and white cells; and, key issues in biomedical ethics including withholding and withdrawing life support, health care delivery, genomics, genetic screening, and neuroethics.

  • Nilima Ragavan

    Nilima Ragavan

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Bio Dr Nilima Ragavan is an experienced clinician who has expertise in the care of newborns ranging from critically ill to well babies. She is passionate about education and is the director of the Stanford pediatric resident rotation in the neonatal intensive care unit. She has led several multi disciplinary teams to India, and has organized and conducted international neonatal and perinatal conferences. She is a member of the palliative care team and serves as a mentor to junior faculty. She is the medical director of the Packard Special Care nursery at Sequoia, and also attends in the NICU at Stanford.

  • Amer Raheemullah

    Amer Raheemullah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Amer Raheemullah, MD, is Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine and Director of the Addiction Medicine Consult Service at Stanford Hospital. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine and has a special interest in developing methods to increase access to basic addiction treatment, through hospital settings, telehealth digital solutions, and criminal justice settings.

    He was born and raised in the Chicagoland area and pursued his undergraduate degree in Economics at the University of Illinois. He worked within the jails and prisons to provide free education and addiction programs for years until completing his Internal Medicine training at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. He moved on to complete an Addiction Medicine fellowship at Stanford and stayed on the faculty to launch the Addiction Medicine Consult Service which offers addiction interventions to hospitalized patients by a team of addiction medicine specialists, peer recovery counselors, and complex care manager. He lives with his wife and two children in the Bay Area where he also helps design digital solutions to increase access to addiction treatment.

  • Zakia Rahman, MD

    Zakia Rahman, MD

    Clinical Professor, Dermatology

    Bio Zakia Rahman, M.D., is Clinical Professor, Assistant Chief at the Livermore Division of the PAVAHCS and Director of the Resident Laser and Aesthetic Clinic. Dr. Rahman serves on the American Academy of Dermatology Diversity Committee. She also is member of the Stanford Physician Wellness Committee and the Stanford Medical School Faculty Senate. Her clinical interests include geriatric dermatology, surgical dermatology, lasers, ethnic skin, fillers and neurotoxins for medical and aesthetic indications. Her research interests include lasers for medical and aesthetic indications and ethnic skin.

  • Hannah Elizabeth Raila

    Hannah Elizabeth Raila

    Academic Staff - Hourly - Csl, Continuing Studies

    Bio Dr. Hannah Raila's training focuses the "diet" of visual information that we consume as we navigate the world (e.g., do we see the crack in the wall, or do we pass by it unaware?), the factors that predispose us to detect this emotional information in our environment the first place, and how this diet of information influences our emotions. To study our visual biases and how they relate to how we feel, she leverages tools from cognitive psychology - including eye tracking and continuous flash suppression (CFS).

    As a postdoctoral researcher in Dr. Carolyn Rodriguez's lab, she is particularly interested in links between visual attention and emotion in OCD, and whether biased visual processing of obsession-related cues contributes to symptom severity.

  • Douglas Rait

    Douglas Rait

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Rait's clinical and research interests include couples and family therapy, the family context of health and illness, family-systems training in medical education, work-couple-family balance, the influence of technology on family relationships, health technology innovation, multidisciplinary team performance, and digital applications in the behavioral sciences.

  • Kristin Raj

    Kristin Raj

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Raj specializes in the treatment of mood disorders with an expertise in neuromodulation and in the psychopharmacological management of bipolar disorder. She is co-chief of the mood disorders section and chief of the bipolar clinic. She is the director of education for interventional psychiatry where she manages resident education in ECT and TMS and development of didactics. She is also co-director of the neuroscience curriculum for the psychiatry residency where she has worked to assess and create a new series of interactive lectures. She currently serves on the Board of Directors and the Education Committee of the Clinical TMS society. She is on the Education Committee of the National Neurosciences Curriculum Initiative.

  • Rishi Raj

    Rishi Raj

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    Bio Dr. Rishi Raj is an Clinical Professor of Medicine at Stanford University and directs the Interstitial Lung Disease program at Stanford. He specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of interstitial lung diseases and has practiced pulmonary and critical care medicine for more than 15 years. Dr. Raj's primary clinical interest and primary focus of clinical research is interstitial lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, other idiopathic interstitial lung diseases, drug induced interstitial lung diseases, interstitial lung disease associated with connective tissue diseases including scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis etc., sarcoidosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and other miscellaneous interstitial lung diseases. Dr. Raj is the principal investigator and co-investigator on multiple clinical trials evaluating new therapies for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary fibrosis/interstitial lung disease from other etiologies.

  • Ram Rajagopal

    Ram Rajagopal

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Bio Ram Rajagopal is an Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University, where he directs the Stanford Sustainable Systems Lab (S3L), focused on large-scale monitoring, data analytics and stochastic control for infrastructure networks, in particular, power networks. His current research interests in power systems are in the integration of renewables, smart distribution systems, and demand-side data analytics.

    He holds a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and an M.A. in Statistics, both from the University of California Berkeley, Masters in Electrical and Computer Engineering from University of Texas, Austin and Bachelors in Electrical Engineering from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. He is a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award, Powell Foundation Fellowship, Berkeley Regents Fellowship and the Makhoul Conjecture Challenge award. He holds more than 30 patents and several best paper awards from his work and has advised or founded various companies in the fields of sensor networks, power systems, and data analytics.

  • Lindsey Ralls

    Lindsey Ralls

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Bio Lindsey Ralls, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at Stanford University. She is originally from California, and after undergraduate training at Stanford University she completed her medical degree and internship at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX. She then returned to the Bay Area and completed her Anesthesia residency (2008) and Obstetric Anesthesia fellowship (2009) at Stanford University. She is interested in applying virtual reality technology to the field of Obstetric Anesthesia.

  • Sneha Ramakrishna

    Sneha Ramakrishna

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    Bio Sneha Ramakrishna, M.D., is an Instructor of Pediatrics in the Division of Hematology and Oncology, working with Dr Crystal Mackall. Dr. Ramakrishna obtained her B. A. from the University of Chicago and her M.D. from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University. She completed her residency training in Pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and her fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at the Johns Hopkins/National Cancer Institute combined program. Her research focuses on identifying mechanisms of relapse in patients following chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies and optimizing both CAR design and tumor sensitivity to improve long-term success of CAR T cell therapies.

  • Chandra Ramamoorthy

    Chandra Ramamoorthy

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Pediatric)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuro protection and neurologic outcomes in cardiac patients prior to and concurrent with cardiac surgery and catheterization

  • R J Ramamurthi

    R J Ramamurthi

    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Prospective collection of pediatric regional block procedures and complications on to a national database

  • Kavitha Ramchandran

    Kavitha Ramchandran

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on innovative models of care delivey to understand how to integrate primary and specialist palliative care. We also do work in palliative care education and how to scale our education to be impactful and sustainable. We are evaluating online models.

    In cancer care I do research on novel therapeutics in thoracic malignancies including immunotherapy, new targeted agents, and new sequencing of approved drugs.

  • Meghan Ramsey

    Meghan Ramsey

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    Bio Dr. Meghan Ramsey is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree from Lafayette College in Pennsylvania with a major in Neuroscience. She then attended Stanford University for medical school where she stayed to complete her internal medicine residency, and pulmonary/critical care fellowship. Her clinical time is split between the inpatient setting in the medical ICU and the ambulatory setting in Interventional Pulmonology with a focus on thoracic malignancies. Outside of her clinical time she has a dedicated commitment to teaching, serving as a mentor for residents and fellows, as well as leading as a co-director the pulmonary physiology course for medical students. Additionally, she has a focus on quality improvement serving as the Pulmonary division quality director.

  • Thomas Rando, MD, PhD

    Thomas Rando, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms regulating stem cell function, the effects of aging on skeletal muscle and skeletal muscle stem cells, and the pathogenesis and experimental therapeutics for hereditary muscle diseases, specifically the muscular dystrophies.

  • Anoop Rao

    Anoop Rao

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Wearable senors, unobtrusive vital sign monitoring, natural language processing/text mining

  • Jianghong Rao

    Jianghong Rao

    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford) and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Probe chemistry and nanotechnology for molecular imaging and diagnostics

  • Natalie L. Rasgon

    Natalie L. Rasgon

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Rasgon has been involved in longitudinal placebo-controlled neuroendocrine studies for nearly two decades, and she has been involved in neuroendocrine and brain imaging studies of estrogen effects on depressed menopausal women for the last eight years. It should be noted that in addition to her duties as a Professor of Psychiatry and Obstetrics & Gynecology, Dr. Rasgon is also the Director of the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Program and of the Women's Wellness Program.

  • Lindsey Rasmussen

    Lindsey Rasmussen

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests reside in the field of Neurocritical Care Medicine. My research focus has included inflammation following traumatic brain injury, outcome prediction after cardiac arrest, and neuro-monitoring in the pediatric intensive care setting. These interests are integrated clinically to focus on the merging of specialized neurologic monitoring and care with prognostic efforts in critically ill patients.

  • Mohammad Reza Rasouli, MD

    Mohammad Reza Rasouli, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Bio Dr. Rasouli is a board-certified anesthesiologist specializing in pain management. He practices at Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare in Pleasanton. He is also a clinical assistant professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative & Pain Medicine.

    Dr. Rasouli takes pride in developing a comprehensive, compassionate treatment plan personalized to each patient in his care. His goals are to
    relieve patients’ chronic pain, and enable them to enjoy the best possible quality of life.

    In addition to his clinical practice, Dr. Rasouli has conducted research and published extensively. He was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Rothman Institute of Orthopaedics at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia.

    Dr. Rasouli has presented the findings of his research at conferences such as the North American Neuromodulation Society Annual Meeting, American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Meeting, American Society of Anesthesiology Annual Meeting, International Anesthesia Research Society Annual Meeting, and Society of Critical Care Anesthesiologists Annual Meeting. Topics have included using spinal cord and peripheral nerve stimulation for treatment of pain, perioperative pain management, and post-surgical recovery.

    He has published more than 100 articles in the peer-reviewed journals Anesthesiology, Anesthesia and Analgesia, Neurosurgery, Lancet, JAMA, Annals of Surgery, and elsewhere. He also has co-authored chapters in Spine Trauma, Epidemiology of Spinal Cord Injuries, Pain Management Following Total Hip Arthroplasty and Total Knee Arthroplasty, and Epidemiology, Diagnosis and Treatment of Sciatica, and other textbooks.

    Dr. Rasouli has earned numerous honors including the Dr. Jeffrey and Celia Joseph Anesthesiology Scholarly Achievement Award. He is a member of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, California Society of Anesthesiologists, American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, North American Neuromodulation Society, American Society of Pain and Neuroscience, and Society of Critical Care Medicine.

  • Caroline E. Rassbach

    Caroline E. Rassbach

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Medical education including learner assessment, program development and mentoring and coaching in medicine.

  • John Ratliff, MD, FACS

    John Ratliff, MD, FACS

    Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests focus upon preventing complications in spine surgery, assessing patient outcomes after spine surgery procedures, and developing population-based metrics for assessing surgical outcomes.

  • Emily Ratner

    Emily Ratner

    Staff Emeritus Retiree, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical effectiveness of acupuncture in medical conditions, use of acupuncture in perioperative settings to reduce opiate and antiemetic use, use of acupuncture in pregnancy for the treatment of nausea, vomiting and other conditions, use of acupuncture in the treatment of the side effects in cancer patients.

  • Noga Ravid

    Noga Ravid

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Children with medical complexity, pain and symptom management, palliative care

  • Jennifer L. Raymond

    Jennifer L. Raymond

    Berthold and Belle N. Guggenhime Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study the neural mechanisms of learning, using a combination of behavioral, neurophysiological, and computational approaches. The model system we use is a form of cerebellum-dependent learning that regulates eye movements.

  • Babak Razavi, MD, PhD

    Babak Razavi, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Razavi's clinical interests are in medically refractory epilepsies and using high density EEG (electroencephalogram) for better localization of seizure foci. His research areas include using advanced digital signal processing and engineering techniques for analyzing EEGs, medical devices for evaluation and treatment of epilepsy, and using seizures as a model for understanding consciousness.

  • Lawrence Recht, MD

    Lawrence Recht, MD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory focuses on two interrelated projects: (1) assessment of glioma development within the framework of the multistage model of carcinogenesis through utilization of the rodent model of ENU neurocarcinogenesis; and (2) assessment of stem cell specification and pluripotency using an embryonic stem cell model system in which neural differentiation is induced.

  • Kristy Red-Horse

    Kristy Red-Horse

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiovascular developmental biology

  • Risheen Reejhsinghani

    Risheen Reejhsinghani

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Risheen Reejhsinghani obtained her medical degree in Mumbai, India, followed by an internal medicine residency at St. Elizabeth's Medical Center in Boston, MA and cardiology fellowship at Baystate Medical Center/Tufts University School of Medicine, where she served as one of the chief fellows. She subsequently completed an advanced echocardiography fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco, and is board certified in echocardiography, general cardiology, and nuclear cardiology.

    Dr. Reejhsinghani practices as a general cardiologist in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, where she also serves as the associate director for the hospital-based consultative cardiology service. As a clinical cardiologist, she believes strongly in the tenets of evidence-based practice, diagnostic cognizance, and patient education. She also has a specific interest in the burgeoning field of Cardio-Rheumatology, focused on cardiac diseases among patients with rheumatologic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, and ankylosing spondylitis, among others. Her clinical research in this area has focused on the evaluation of structural cardiac disease and diastolic dysfunction in ankylosing spondylitis patients, primarily using echocardiography.

    Dr. Reejhsinghani has an academic focus in medical education, and believes that instilling a love for bedside medicine and the physical exam is the soundest way to empower future generations of learners. To this end, she received additional training in clinical teaching and simulation at the University of California, San Francisco, and has worked extensively on curriculum and course design. She currently serves as the associate program director of the cardiovascular medicine fellowship at Stanford, and is an associate course director for the Year 1 Practice of Medicine Course at the Stanford University medical school. Dr. Reejhsinghani also enjoys writing, particularly about medical education and has written articles for international newspapers, among other publications.

  • Matthew F. Reeves

    Matthew F. Reeves

    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology

    Bio Dr. Matthew Reeves is the Executive Director and founder of the DuPont Clinic, a center providing patient-centered abortion care in all trimesters. With the team at the DuPont Clinic, Dr. Reeves has worked to re-envision the patient experience, create a new patient flow without a waiting room, develop new shortened protocols for later abortion, improve nurse-administered moderate sedation techniques, and introduce new and redesigned gynecologic instruments. Dr. Reeves also serves on the board of directors of DKT International, a social marketing organization that provided over 44 million couple-years of contraception in over 25 countries and is now the sole distributor for Ipas aspirators and Sino-Implant II. Previously, he was Medical Director of the National Abortion Federation where he worked to improve the quality of abortion care across North and South America. From 2010-2014, Dr. Reeves was the Chief Medical Officer of WomanCare Global where his work focused on expanding use of manual uterine aspiration and introducing mifepristone and levonorgestrel implants to new markets. Throughout his career, Dr. Reeves has worked on clinical research, primarily in the areas of post-abortal intrauterine contraception and improvements in abortion service delivery. In addition to this appointment at Stanford, he currently has an appointment as an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Reeves attended Harvard Medical School and completed residency in obstetrics & gynecology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He then completed the fellowship in Clinical Ultrasound at UCSF followed by the Fellowship in Family Planning at the University of Pittsburgh.

  • Donald Regula, MD

    Donald Regula, MD

    Professor (Teaching) of Pathology and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Regula is a course director for the required medical student course, Science of Medicine.

  • David Rehkopf

    David Rehkopf

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Sociology

    Bio I am a social epidemiologist and serve as an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. I joined the faculty at Stanford School of Medicine in 2011.

    I am currently the co-director of the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences. In this position I am committed to making high value data resources available to researchers across disciplines in order to better enable them to answer their most pressing clinical and population health questions.

    My own research is focused on understanding the health implications of the myriad decisions that are made by corporations and governments every day - decisions that profoundly shape the social and economic worlds in which we live and work. While these changes are often invisible to us on a daily basis, these seemingly minor actions and decisions form structural nudges that can create better or worse health at a population level. My work demonstrates the health implications of corporate and governmental decisions that can give the public and policy makers evidence to support new strategies for promoting health and well-being. In all of his work, I have a focus on the implications of these exposures for health inequalities.

    Since often policy and programmatic changes can take decades to influence health, my work also includes more basic research in understanding biological signals that may act as early warning signs of systemic disease, in particular accelerated aging. I examine how social and economic policy changes influence a range of early markers of disease and aging, with a particular recent focus on DNA methylation. I am supported by several grants from the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities to develop new more sensitive ways to understand the health implications of social and economic policy changes.

  • Daryn Reicherter

    Daryn Reicherter

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Reicherter the director of the Human Rights in Trauma Mental Health Laboratory.

    He has expertise in the area of cross-cultural trauma psychiatry, having spent more than a decade dedicated to providing a combination of administrative and clinical services in trauma mental health locally and internationally. He is on the List of Experts for the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia and for the United Nations’ International Criminal Court. He is on the Fulbright Specialists Roster for his work in international trauma mental health. He is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Innovations in Global Health at Stanford University. He has created and cultivated new clinical rotations for residency education and medical school education in the community clinics that he operates. And he has created new opportunities for resident, medical student, and undergraduate education in Global Mental Health.

    He has also been involved in the creation of clinical mental health programs for underserved populations in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is the Faculty Adviser for the Stanford’s Free Clinic Mental Health Program.

    After receiving degrees in Psychobiology and Philosophy from the University of California at Santa Cruz, Dr. Reicherter completed his doctorate in medicine at New York Medical College. He completed internship and residency and served as Chief Resident at Stanford University Hospitals and Clinics.

  • Richard J. Reimer, MD

    Richard J. Reimer, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Reimer Lab interests

    A primary interest of our lab is to understand how nerve cells make and recycle neurotransmitters, the small molecules that they use to communicate with each other. In better defining these processes we hope to achieve our long-term goal of identifying novel sites for treatment of diseases such as epilepsy and Parkinson Disease. In our studies on neurotransmitter metabolism we have focused our efforts on transporters, a functional class of proteins that move neurotransmitters and other small molecules across membranes in cells. Transporters have many characteristics that make them excellent pharmacological targets, and not surprisingly some of the most effective treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders are directed at transporters. We are specifically focusing on two groups of transporters – vesicular neurotransmitter transporters that package neurotransmitters into vesicles for release, and glutamine transporters that shuttle glutamine, a precursor for two major neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA, to neurons from glia, the supporting cells that surround them. We are pursuing these goals through molecular and biochemical studies, and, in collaboration with the Huguenard and Prince labs, through physiological and biosensor based imaging studies to better understand how pharmacological targeting of these molecules will influence neurological disorders.

    A second interest of our lab is to define mechanism underlying the pathology of lysosomal storage disorders. Lysosomes are membrane bound acidic intracellular organelles filled with hydrolytic enzymes that normally function as recycling centers within cells by breaking down damaged cellular macromolecules. Several degenerative diseases designated as lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are associated with the accumulation of material within lysosomes. Tay-Sachs disease, Neimann-Pick disease and Gaucher disease are some of the more common LSDs. For reasons that remain incompletely understood, these diseases often affect the nervous system out of proportion to other organs. As a model for LSDs we are studying the lysosomal free sialic acid storage disorders. These diseases are the result of a defect in transport of sialic acid across lysosomal membranes and are associated with mutations in the gene encoding the sialic acid transporter sialin. We are using molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches to better define the normal function of sialin and to determine how loss of sialin function leads to neurodevelopmental defects and neurodegeneration associated with the lysosomal free sialic acid storage disorders.

  • Olaf Reinhartz

    Olaf Reinhartz

    Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Mechanical circulatory support in failing Fontan circulation
    2. Pathophysiologic response to fetal cardiac surgery.
    3. Various clinical projects in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery

  • Allan L. Reiss

    Allan L. Reiss

    Howard C. Robbins Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Professor of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory, the Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research (CIBSR), focuses on multi-level scientific study of individuals with typical and atypical brain structure and function. Data are obtained from genetic analyses, structural and functional neuroimaging studies, assessment of endocrinological status, neurobehavioral assessment, and analysis of pertinent environmental factors. Our overarching focus is to model how brain disorders arise and to develop disease-specific treatments.

  • Johannes Reiter

    Johannes Reiter

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Canary Center) and, by courtesy, of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the stochastic biological processes underlying cancer evolution with the goal to improve diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of tumors. I develop computational methods and design mathematical models to generate novel hypotheses and explain observations on a mechanistic level.

  • Bruce A Reitz

    Bruce A Reitz

    Norman E. Shumway Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanism of allograft rejection for the heart and, lung; late chronic effects of rejection, such as graft coronary, atherosclerosis in the heart and bronchiolitis obliterans in the, lung; treatment of rejection, including pharmacologic agents, total, lymphoid irradiation, and the induction of tolerance in fetal, animals; clinical studies include the results of lung and heart-lung, transplantation, modification of immunosuppressive protocols, and, factors contributing to late chronic rejection.

  • David A. Relman

    David A. Relman

    Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My investigative program focuses on human-microbe interactions and human microbial ecology, and primarily concerns the ecology of human indigenous microbial communities; a secondary interest concerns the classification of humans with systemic infectious diseases, based on features of genome-wide gene transcript abundance patterns and pther aspects of the host response.

  • Malte Renz, MD, PhD

    Malte Renz, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Gynecologic Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in cell motility and molecular dynamics. I believe that intra- and intercellular molecular dynamics, compartmentalization, and complex formation may differentiate disease from normal beyond the expression level of proteins and may constitute relevant pathomechanisms. The tools I am using are quantitative fluorescence live-cell microscopy on the ensemble and single-molecule level. I aim to bridge direct patient care and basic research.

  • Andrew Rezvani, M.D.

    Andrew Rezvani, M.D.

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical research in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

  • James H Rhee

    James H Rhee

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Rhee is a physiatrist and a clinical assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation. For patients with spine and musculoskeletal conditions, he focuses on providing exceptional care emphasizing minimally invasive solutions designed to optimize symptom managementand patient function.

    Building on his background in engineering and on his specialized medical training and experience, Dr. Rhee welcomes opportunities to combine medical, mechanical, and interpersonal approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of each patient. He offers a full range of treatment modalities, including epidural steroid injection procedures, sacroiliac and facet joint injections, trigger point and soft tissue injections, orthopedic joint injections, and more. He also provides medial branch blocks and radiofrequency ablations, and performs electrodiagnostic studies.

    Among the wide range of conditions that Dr. Rhee treats are bursitis, herniated discs, radiculopathy, sciatica, spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and spondylosis. He also has treated many forms of joint and muscle pain: facet joint, back, neck, hip, and sacroiliac joint pain.

    Dr. Rhee’s experience encompasses short-term and long-term care for both acute and chronic conditions, including musculoskeletal injuries, spinal problems, mixed spine-neck and spine-shoulder disorders, and peripheral damage. Many of the cases he treats are injury-related, while a significant number of others are associated with aging. Another portion of his patient population presents with conditions stemming from developmental anomalies.

    Prior to joining Stanford Health Care, Dr. Rhee was in private practice in the Bay Area. Previously, he also served in the US Army as a troop medical clinic officer-in-charge and as a brigade surgeon.

    Dr. Rhee is board certified by the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and a member of the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, North American Spine Society, and Spine Intervention Society.

  • Jinnie J. Rhee

    Jinnie J. Rhee

    Instructor, Medicine - Nephrology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pharmacoepidemiology of type 2 diabetes and diabetes complications
    Diabetes management in patients with chronic kidney disease
    Nutritional epidemiology of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease
    Racial and ethnic health disparities in diabetes and diabetes-related outcomes
    Implementation science and clinical decision analysis
    Qualitative research and mixed methods research

  • June-Wha Rhee

    June-Wha Rhee

    Instructor, Cardiovascular Institute

    Bio Dr. Rhee is a general cardiologist with specialized clinical and research training in cardiovascular drug toxicity and pharmacogenomics. She completed clinical cardiology fellowship and internal medicine residency training at Stanford University School of Medicine. During her post-doctoral training, Dr. Rhee's research focused on elucidating cardiotoxic effects of iron overload and of multiple chemotherapeutic agents using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived models. Her current research employs clinical data, population genomics, and patient-derived iPSCs models to study genetic determinants and mechanisms of drug-induced cardiovascular toxicities. Dr. Rhee's clinic sees cardio-oncology patients and focuses on devising new methods for minimizing cardiovascular complications in that population.

  • William Rhine

    William Rhine

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neonatology, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, nitric oxide therapy, mechanisms of bilirubin toxicity and brain injury, non-invasive biotechnologies to study cellular and organ metabolism.

  • Anthony Ricci

    Anthony Ricci

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The auditory sensory cell, the hair cell, detects mechanical stimulation at the atomic level and conveys information regarding frequency and intensity to the brain with high fidelity. Our interests are in identifying specializations associated with mechanotransduction and synaptic transmission leading to the amazing sensitivities of the auditory system. We are also interested in the developmental process, particularly in how development gives insight into repair and regenerative mechanisms.

  • Mr Brian Travis Rice

    Mr Brian Travis Rice

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Developing data-driven approaches to defining and comparing chief complaints fro emergency and unscheduled acute care in low- and middle-income countries

  • Stephen Richmond

    Stephen Richmond

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Dr. Stephen Richmond is a family physician, educator, and heath justice advocate with specific interest in racial equity in medicine. He currently serves as a Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Stanford Division of Primary Care and Population Health. He completed his BA in Molecular & Cell Biology at UC Berkeley, MPH at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and MD at David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA. He is a graduate of the UCSF-SFGH Family & Community Medicine Residency Program. As a clinician, Dr. Richmond cares for individuals of all ages with a wide range of acute and chronic illnesses. He is especially passionate about providing high quality, evidenced-based care to underserved communities of color. As a researcher and educator, his interests broadly involve the intersection of race, racism, and medicine, with current projects focused on applications of Critical Race Theory to medical education and clinical care. He most recently served as the co-director of the Health Equity & Racial Justice Graduate Medical Education Pathway at UCSF and is presently involved in many ongoing advocacy efforts aimed at achieving structural change. Dr. Richmond has received multiple teaching awards for his work in the space of diversity, equity, inclusion & anti-oppression in medicine, and is a routine presenter and consultant in these areas.

  • Ashley Christine Rider

    Ashley Christine Rider

    Clinical Instructor, Emergency Medicine

    Bio Ashley Rider works clinically as an attending in the Stanford Emergency Department. Her academic interests include simulation-based education at the UME/GME levels, procedural competence, interprofessional education, resuscitation team leadership, social emergency medicine, and quality improvement. To explore these interests she is completing a fellowship in Simulation Education within the Department of Emergency Medicine, and is simultaneously pursuing a Master of Education in the Health Professions (MEHP) at Johns Hopkins School of Education. She completed her training in emergency medicine at Highland Hospital in Oakland, CA.

  • Kerri E. Rieger, MD, PhD

    Kerri E. Rieger, MD, PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pathology

    Bio Dr. Rieger is a Clinical Associate Professor of Pathology and Dermatology at Stanford University. She received her M.D., Ph.D. from Stanford University School of Medicine and completed her Dermatology Residency and Dermatopathology Fellowship at Stanford University. She is board certified in Dermatology and Dermatopathology. She evaluates skin specimens in the Pathology department, where her interests include histopathologic findings in hospitalized patients and patients with autoimmune disease. She also sees patients in the dermatology clinic at the Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center in Redwood City, where her clinical interest is adult general dermatology.

  • Edward Riley

    Edward Riley

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (OB) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Bio Dr. Riley is a member of the Obstetric Anesthesia Division. He was the chief of the division for 12 years. His research interests focus on quality improvement and clinical questions relevant to obstetric anesthesia. He also has strong interest in international medicine. He is a board member and active clinician with the International Eye Institute and is active with Kybele (an international obstetric anesthesia outreach program),

  • Geoffrey Riley

    Geoffrey Riley

    Clinical Professor, Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Femoroacetabular impingement MRI, Hip MRI

  • Lawrence Rinsky

    Lawrence Rinsky

    Professor (Clinical) of Orthopaedic Surgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The primary subjects of my research interests over the past ten years have been clinical reviews of series of patients with a variety of pediatric orthopaedic treatable conditions. These have included neuromuscular scoliosis, developmental dislocation of the hip, and deformities in cerebral palsy.

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