School of Medicine


Showing 301-400 of 443 Results

  • Oxana Palesh

    Oxana Palesh

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research focused on developing interventions for management of side effects of cancer treatments (e.g., sleep disturbance, fatigue, depression, anxiety).

  • Theo Palmer

    Theo Palmer

    Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Members of the Palmer Lab study the biology of neural stem cells in brain development and in the adult. Our primary goal is to understand how genes and environment synergize in influencing stem cell behavior during development and how mild genetic or environmental risk factors for disease may synergize in their detrimental effects on brain development or in the risk of neuronal loss in age-related degenerative disease.

  • Peter Parham

    Peter Parham

    Professor of Structural Biology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Parham laboratory investigates the biology, genetics, and evolution of MHC class I molecules and NK cell receptors.

  • Walter Park

    Walter Park

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Park's research interests are in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cysts, acute and chronic pancreatitis. His approach incorporates methods in health services research including the use of observational datasets, cost-effectiveness studies, and the development of clinical cohorts.

  • Julie Parsonnet

    Julie Parsonnet

    George DeForest Barnett Professor in Medicine and Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am an infectious diseases epidemiologist who has done large field studies in both the US and developing countries. We research the long-term consequences of chronic interactions between the human host and the microbial world. My lab has done fundamental work establishing the role of H. pylori in causing disease and understanding its epidemiology. Currently, our research dissects how and when children first encounter microbes and the long term effects of these exposures on health.

  • Chirag Patel, MD, PhD

    Chirag Patel, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuro-oncology, Clinical Trials, Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields), Molecular/PET Imaging, Neuroimaging, Immunotherapy, Big Data Analysis

  • John M. Pauly

    John M. Pauly

    Reid Weaver Dennis Professor

    Bio Interests include medical imaging generally, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular. Current efforts are focused on medical applications of MRI where real-time interactive imaging is important. Two examples are cardiac imaging, and the interactive guidance of interventional procedures. Specific interests include rapid methods for the excitation and acquisition of the MR signal, and the reconstruction of images from the data acquired using these approaches.

  • Kim Butts Pauly

    Kim Butts Pauly

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are investigating and developing, and applying focused ultrasound in neuromodulation, blood brain barrier opening, and ablation for both neuro and body applications.

  • Christopher K. Payne, MD

    Christopher K. Payne, MD

    Professor of Urology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Obstetric Fistula Projects:
    1. Preoperative ultrasound evaluation to detect ureteric involvement in vesicovaginal fistulas
    2. Patient narrative study to identify key medical, social and economic factors that lead to fistula formation
    3. Study of urinary continence after fistula repair

    Pelvic pain: investigation into role of pelvic floor in chronic pelvic pain

  • Donna Peehl, PhD

    Donna Peehl, PhD

    Professor (Research) of Urology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the molecular and cellular biology of the human prostate. Developing realistic experimental models is a major goal, and primary cultures of prostatic epithelial and stromal cells are my main model system. Our discoveries are relevant to prevention, detection, diagnosis and treatment of benign and malignant prostatic diseases.

  • Mark Pegram

    Mark Pegram

    Susy Yuan-Huey Hung Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular mechanisms of targeted therapy resistance in breast and other cancers

  • Norbert Pelc

    Norbert Pelc

    Boston Scientific Applied Biomedical Engineering Professor and Professor of Radiology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Broadly, Dr. Pelc is interested in the physics, engineering and mathematics of medical imaging, especially computed tomography, digital x-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and hybrid multimodality systems. His current research is concentrated in the development of computed tomography systems with higher image quality and dose efficiency, in the characterization of system performance, and in the development and validation of new clinical applications.

  • VJ Periyakoil, Geriatrics, Hospice & Palliative Medicine

    VJ Periyakoil, Geriatrics, Hospice & Palliative Medicine

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the intersection of biological, psychosocial and cultural aspects of care of persons with chronic and serious illnesses including dementia.

  • Suzanne Pfeffer

    Suzanne Pfeffer

    Emma Pfeiffer Merner Professor in the Medical Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The major focuses of our research is to understand the molecular basis of inherited Parkinson's Disease (PD) and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which proteins and cholesterol are transported between specific membrane compartments. We focus on the LRRK2 kinase that is inappropriately activated in PD and how it phosphorylates Rab GTPases, blocking the formation of primary cilia in culture and specific regions of the brain.

  • Harlan Pinto

    Harlan Pinto

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical Interests: general oncology, head and neck cancer Research Interests: chemoprevention trials and combined modality approaches to head and neck cancer

  • Sharon Pitteri

    Sharon Pitteri

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (Cancer Early Detection-Canary Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Pitteri laboratory is focused on the discovery and validation of proteins that can be used as molecular indicators of risk, diagnosis, progression, and recurrence of cancer. Proteomic technologies, predominantly mass spectrometry, are used to identify proteins in the blood that are differentially regulated and/or post-translationally modified with disease state. Using human plasma samples, tumor tissue, cancer cell lines, and genetically engineered mouse models, the origins of these proteins are being investigated. A major goal of this research is to define novel molecular signatures for breast and ovarian cancers, including particular sub-types of these diseases. This laboratory is also focused on the identification of proteins with expression restricted to the surface of cancer cells which can be used as novel targets for molecular imaging technologies.

  • Philip A. Pizzo, M.D.

    Philip A. Pizzo, M.D.

    David and Susan Heckerman Professor and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Bio Philip Pizzo, MD, is the David and Susan Heckerman Professor and Founding Director of the Stanford Distinguished Careers Institute. Pizzo served as Dean of the Stanford School of Medicine from April 2001 to December 1, 2012, where he was also the Carl and Elizabeth Naumann Professor of Pediatrics and of Microbiology and Immunology. Dr. Pizzo has devoted much of his distinguished medical career to the diagnosis, management, prevention and treatment of childhood cancers and the infectious complications that occur in children whose immune systems are compromised by cancer and AIDS. He has also been a leader in academic medicine, championing programs and policies to improve the future of science, education and healthcare in the US and beyond.
    Pizzo received his MD degree with Honors and Distinction in Research from the University of Rochester in 1970, and completed an internship and residency at Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Boston, a teaching fellowship at Harvard Medical School, and a clinical and research fellowship in pediatric oncology at the National Cancer Institute. Pizzo served as head of the Institute’s infectious disease section, chief of the NCI’s pediatric department, and acting scientific director for NCI’s Division of Clinical Sciences between 1973 and 1996. Before joining Stanford in 2001, he was the physician-in-chief of Children’s Hospital in Boston and Chair of the Department of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, where he was also the Thomas Morgan Rotch Professor of Pediatrics.
    Dr. Pizzo is the author of more than 615 scientific articles and 16 books and monographs, including Principles and Practice of Pediatric Oncology, the Seventh Edition of which was published in 2015.
    Pizzo has received numerous awards and honors, among them the Public Health Service Outstanding Service Medal in 1995, the Barbara Bohen Pfiefer Award for Scientific Excellence in 1991, the Elizabeth Kubler-Ross Award in 2008, the Ronald McDonald Charities “Award of Excellence” in 2009, and the John and Emma Bonica Public Service Award in 2013. He is the 2012 recipient of the John Howland Award, the highest honor for lifetime achievement bestowed by the American Pediatric Society. He has been elected to a number of prestigious organizations and societies, including the Association of American Physicians, the American Society of Clinical Investigation, the American Pediatric Society and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, where he was also elected to the Governing Council. The IOM became the National Academy of Medicine in 2015. He has served as Chair of the Association of Academic Health Centers and Chair of the Council of Deans of the Association of American Medical Colleges, and was elected to the Board of Directors of the American Society for Clinical Oncology and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. He was President of the International Immunocompromised Host Society (1998-2011). He served on the Governing Board for the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine from 2004-2012. In 2009 he was elected to the Board of Trustees of the University of Rochester and the Board of Overseers of Koc University in Istanbul, Turkey. He was a member of the Board of Directors of MRI Interventions (2013-2017) and the Academic Advisory Council for Merritt Hawkins (2015-present). In 2014 he was elected to the Board of Directors of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and in 2015 he was elected to the Board of Directors of Global Blood Therapeutics. He also serves as Editor-in-Chief of Current Opinion in Pediatrics.

  • Sylvia K. Plevritis, PhD

    Sylvia K. Plevritis, PhD

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research program focuses on computational modeling of cancer biology and cancer outcomes. My laboratory develops stochastic models of the natural history of cancer based on clinical research data. We estimate population-level outcomes under differing screening and treatment interventions. We also analyze genomic and proteomic cancer data in order to identify molecular networks that are perturbed in cancer initiation and progression and relate these perturbations to patient outcomes.

  • Jonathan Pollack

    Jonathan Pollack

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research in the Pollack lab centers on translational genomics, with a focus on human cancer. The lab employs next-generation sequencing, single-cell genomics, genome editing, and cell/tissue-based modeling to uncover disease mechanisms, biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Current areas of emphasis include diseases of the prostate (prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia), as well as odontogenic neoplasms.

  • Matthew Porteus

    Matthew Porteus

    Sutardja Chuk Professor of Definitive and Curative Medicine

    Bio Dr. Porteus was raised in California and was a local graduate of Gunn High School before completing A.B. degree in “History and Science” at Harvard University where he graduated Magna Cum Laude and wrote an thesis entitled “Safe or Dangerous Chimeras: The recombinant DNA controversy as a conflict between differing socially constructed interpretations of recombinant DNA technology.” He then returned to the area and completed his combined MD, PhD at Stanford Medical School with his PhD focused on understanding the molecular basis of mammalian forebrain development with his PhD thesis entitled “Isolation and Characterization of TES-1/DLX-2: A Novel Homeobox Gene Expressed During Mammalian Forebrain Development.” After completion of his dual degree program, he was an intern and resident in Pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital and then completed his Pediatric Hematology/Oncology fellowship in the combined Boston Chidlren’s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute program. For his fellowship and post-doctoral research he worked with Dr. David Baltimore at MIT and CalTech where he began his studies in developing homologous recombination as a strategy to correct disease causing mutations in stem cells as definitive and curative therapy for children with genetic diseases of the blood, particularly sickle cell disease. Following his training with Dr. Baltimore, he took an independent faculty position at UT Southwestern in the Departments of Pediatrics and Biochemistry before again returning to Stanford in 2010 as an Associate Professor. During this time his work has been the first to demonstrate that gene correction could be achieved in human cells at frequencies that were high enough to potentially cure patients and is considered one of the pioneers and founders of the field of genome editing—a field that now encompasses thousands of labs and several new companies throughout the world. His research program continues to focus on developing genome editing by homologous recombination as curative therapy for children with genetic diseases but also has interests in the clonal dynamics of heterogeneous populations and the use of genome editing to better understand diseases that affect children including infant leukemias and genetic diseases that affect the muscle. Clinically, Dr. Porteus attends at the Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital where he takes care of pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  • George A. Poultsides, MD, MS, FACS

    George A. Poultsides, MD, MS, FACS

    Professor of Surgery (General Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical trials of experimental diagnostics and therapeutics; outcomes analysis following combined modality treatment of hepatic, pancreatic, and gastrointestinal malignancies.

  • Guillem Pratx

    Guillem Pratx

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Physical Oncology Lab is interested in making a lasting impact on translational cancer research by building novel physical tools and methods.

  • Judith Prochaska

    Judith Prochaska

    Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Prochaska's research expertise centers on technology-mediated health behavior change interventions including targets of tobacco, physical activity, and dietary change. Working with Alaska Native and Latino communities, people with serious mental illness, alcohol and drug problems, or heart disease, and jobseekers and the unhoused, Dr. Prochaska’s research combines stage-tailored interventions with pharmacotherapy and utilizes interactive expert system interventions and social media.

  • Carla Pugh, MD, PhD

    Carla Pugh, MD, PhD

    Stanford Medicine Professor of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Technology Enabled Clinical Improvement (T.E.C.I.) Center is a multidisciplinary team of researchers dedicated to the design and implementation of advanced engineering technologies that facilitate data acquisition relating to clinical performance.

  • Lei Stanley Qi

    Lei Stanley Qi

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Bio Dr. Lei Stanley Qi is Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering, Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, and a faculty fellow in Stanford ChEM-H. He is one of major contributors to the CRISPR technology development for genome engineering. He demonstrated the first use of the nuclease-deactivated Cas9 (dCas9) for genome targeting in cells. Using dCas9, His lab developed the CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) and CRISPR activation (CRISPRa) technologies for gene expression regulation, which is broadly used for high-throughput study of genomics in different organisms. He co-developed the CRISPR application for chromatin imaging in living cells. His lab greatly expanded the CRISPR toolbox for engineering the genome and epigenome, including multiplexed epigenome editing, programmable 3D genome manipulation (CRISPR-GO), live-cell imaging (LiveFISH), and CRISPR antivirals for targeting RNA viruses (PAC-MAN). He obtained B.S. in Physics from Tsinghua University, and Ph.D. in Bioengineering from the University of California Berkeley in 2012. He joined UCSF as Systems Biology Faculty Fellow between 2012 to 2014, and joined the faculty at Stanford University since 2014. His lab combines genome engineering with synthetic biology to understand the function of mammalian genomes and develop gene therapy.

  • Stephen Quake

    Stephen Quake

    Lee Otterson Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Bioengineering, of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Single molecule biophysics, precision force measurement, micro and nano fabrication with soft materials, integrated microfluidics and large scale biological automation.

  • Kavitha Ramchandran

    Kavitha Ramchandran

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on innovative models of care delivey to understand how to integrate primary and specialist palliative care. We also do work in palliative care education and how to scale our education to be impactful and sustainable. We are evaluating online models.

    In cancer care I do research on novel therapeutics in thoracic malignancies including immunotherapy, new targeted agents, and new sequencing of approved drugs.

  • Jianghong Rao

    Jianghong Rao

    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford) and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Probe chemistry and nanotechnology for molecular imaging and diagnostics

  • Lawrence Recht, MD

    Lawrence Recht, MD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory focuses on two interrelated projects: (1) assessment of glioma development within the framework of the multistage model of carcinogenesis through utilization of the rodent model of ENU neurocarcinogenesis; and (2) assessment of stem cell specification and pluripotency using an embryonic stem cell model system in which neural differentiation is induced.

  • David Rehkopf

    David Rehkopf

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Sociology

    Bio I am a social epidemiologist and serve as an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. I joined the faculty at Stanford School of Medicine in 2011.

    I am currently the co-director of the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences. In this position I am committed to making high value data resources available to researchers across disciplines in order to better enable them to answer their most pressing clinical and population health questions.

    My own research is focused on understanding the health implications of the myriad decisions that are made by corporations and governments every day - decisions that profoundly shape the social and economic worlds in which we live and work. While these changes are often invisible to us on a daily basis, these seemingly minor actions and decisions form structural nudges that can create better or worse health at a population level. My work demonstrates the health implications of corporate and governmental decisions that can give the public and policy makers evidence to support new strategies for promoting health and well-being. In all of his work, I have a focus on the implications of these exposures for health inequalities.

    Since often policy and programmatic changes can take decades to influence health, my work also includes more basic research in understanding biological signals that may act as early warning signs of systemic disease, in particular accelerated aging. I examine how social and economic policy changes influence a range of early markers of disease and aging, with a particular recent focus on DNA methylation. I am supported by several grants from the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities to develop new more sensitive ways to understand the health implications of social and economic policy changes.

  • Johannes Reiter

    Johannes Reiter

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Canary Center) and, by courtesy, of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the stochastic biological processes underlying cancer evolution with the goal to improve diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of tumors. I develop computational methods and design mathematical models to generate novel hypotheses and explain observations on a mechanistic level.

  • David A. Relman

    David A. Relman

    Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My investigative program focuses on human-microbe interactions and human microbial ecology, and primarily concerns the ecology of human indigenous microbial communities; a secondary interest concerns the classification of humans with systemic infectious diseases, based on features of genome-wide gene transcript abundance patterns and pther aspects of the host response.

  • Malte Renz, MD, PhD

    Malte Renz, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Gynecologic Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in cell motility and molecular dynamics. I believe that intra- and intercellular molecular dynamics, compartmentalization, and complex formation may differentiate disease from normal beyond the expression level of proteins and may constitute relevant pathomechanisms. The tools I am using are quantitative fluorescence live-cell microscopy on the ensemble and single-molecule level. I aim to bridge direct patient care and basic research.

  • Andrew Rezvani, M.D.

    Andrew Rezvani, M.D.

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical research in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

  • William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    James W. Raitt, M.D. Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab studies the molecular mechanisms of and develops therapies to treat autoimmune and rheumatic diseases, with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and osteoarthritis.

    The overriding objectives of our laboratory are:

    1. To investigate the mechanisms underlying autoimmune diseases.

    2. To develop diagnostics and therapeutics for autoimmune diseases.

    3. To investigate the role of inflammation in osteoarthritis.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Endowed Professor in Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Allan and Tina Neill Professor of Lymphatic Research and Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical research includes studies on risk factor modification in atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease; clinical trials involving medical therapies for peripheral arterial insufficiency; coronary angiogenesis; therapy of lymphedema; atherand photodynamic therapy in atherosclerosis.

  • Rajat Rohatgi

    Rajat Rohatgi

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests the overall goal of my laboratory is to uncover new regulatory mechanisms in signaling systems, to understand how these mechanisms are damaged in disease states, and to devise new strategies to repair their function.

  • Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    George D. Smith Professor in Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine and Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research Interests
    Immunetolerance: Mechanisms underlying T-cell tolerance, induction of T-cell anergy and regulatory T cells; Immunomodulation: mAbs, proteins and low molecular weight compounds which can modulate T-cell activation; Primary immunodeficiencies: Characterization of molecular and immunological defects; Gene therapy: Gene transduction of hematopoietic cells for gene therapy in primary immunodeficiencies and metabolic diseases; Hematopoiesis: Mechanisms underlying growth and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells; Transplantation: Immune reconstitution and T-cell tolerance after allogenic stem cell transplantation; Cytokines/Cytokine receptors: Role in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses

    Clinical Interests
    Primary Immunodeficiencies
    Monogenic Autoimmune Disorders
    Allogenic Bone Marrow Transplantation
    Gene Therapy Clinical Trials
    Cell Therapy Clinical Trials
    Clinical Trials in Autoimmune Diseases and Organ Transplantation
    Clinical Trials in Hemoglobinopathies

  • Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Bio Lisa Goldman Rosas, PhD MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford School of Medicine. An epidemiologist by training, Dr. Goldman Rosas’ research focuses on addressing disparities in chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, depression, and cancer among racial/ethnic minority families. This research features rigorous quantitative and qualitative methodologies, participatory qualitative approaches, and shared leadership with patient and community partners. She is passionate about integrating patients, caregivers, community organizations, and other key stakeholders in the research process in order to affect the greatest improvements in health and well-being. As a reflection of this passion, Dr. Goldman Rosas serves as the Faculty Director for the School of Medicine Office of Community Engagement and the Stanford Cancer Institute Community Outreach and Engagement Program. In these roles, she supports other faculty and patient and community partners to develop sustainable and meaningful partnerships to support transformative research. In addition to research, she teaches at the undergraduate and graduate levels and has a special focus on increasing diversity in biomedical research.

  • Saul A Rosenberg

    Saul A Rosenberg

    Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor in the School of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical Interests: Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas Research Interests: clinical trials, clinical-pathological-biological correlations

  • David Rosenthal

    David Rosenthal

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests include the study of Heart Failure, Cardiomyopathy and ventricular dysfunction in children, from a clinical perspective. Investigations include clinical trials of medications, cardiac resynchronization, and mechanical circulatory support.

  • Eben Rosenthal

    Eben Rosenthal

    Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Bio Eben Rosenthal is a surgeon-scientist and academic leader. He is currently serving as the John and Ann Doerr Medical Director of the Stanford Cancer Center, a position he has held since July 2015. He works collaboratively with the Stanford Cancer Institute and Stanford Health Care leaders to set the strategy for the clinical delivery of cancer care across Stanford Medicine and growing cancer networks.

    Before coming to Stanford, he learned his surgical skills in otolaryngology from the University of Michigan and traveled west for further training in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery at the Oregon Health and Science University. He joined the faculty at University of Alabama at Birmingham where he started as an Assistant Professor of Surgery within the Division of Otolaryngology. In 2012, Dr. Rosenthal became Division Director of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and the holder of the John S. Odess Endowed Chair at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He moved to Stanford in 2015 to become the Ann and John Doerr Medical Director of the Stanford Cancer Center.

    Dr. Rosenthal is certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology and is a Diplomat of the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. He specializes in the treatment and reconstruction of head and neck cancer patients. He has a strong interest in development of new strategies to surgically repair complex head and neck defects to improve functional and cosmetic outcomes.

    He has published over 160 peer-reviewed scientific manuscripts, authored many book chapters and published a book on optical imaging in cancer. He is on the editorial board of Head & Neck and The Laryngoscope and is also a charter member of the NIH Developmental Therapeutics Study Section. Dr. Rosenthal has performed preclinical and clinical research on the role of targeted therapies for use to treat cancer alone and in combination with conventional therapy. He has served as principal investigator on several early phase investigator-initiated and industry sponsored clinical trials in molecular oncology. He has received grant funding from the American Cancer Society, NIH/NCI and NIH/NIDCR to study the role of targeted therapy and novel imaging strategies in cancer.

    Dr. Rosenthal has conducted bench to bedside development of optical contrast agents to identify cancer in the operating room. He led a multidisciplinary team of scientists through successful IND application to allow testing of fluorescently labeled antibodies in the clinic and operating room. These early phase clinical trials have demonstrated that this technique can visualize microscopic cancer in the operating room and may significantly improve clinical outcomes.

  • Daniel Rubin

    Daniel Rubin

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford), of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research) and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology and of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interest is imaging informatics--ways computers can work with images to leverage their rich information content and to help physicians use images to guide personalized care. Work in our lab thus lies at the intersection of biomedical informatics and imaging science.

  • Mirabela Rusu

    Mirabela Rusu

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Mirabela Rusu focuses on developing analytic methods for biomedical data integration, with a particular interest in radiology-pathology fusion. Such integrative methods may be applied to create comprehensive multi-scale representations of biomedical processes and pathological conditions, thus enabling their in-depth characterization.

  • Chiara Sabatti

    Chiara Sabatti

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Statistical models and reasoning are key to our understanding of the genetic basis of human traits. Modern high-throughput technology presents us with new opportunities and challenges. We develop statistical approaches for high dimensional data in the attempt of improving our understanding of the molecular basis of health related traits.

  • Julien Sage

    Julien Sage

    Elaine and John Chambers Professor of Pediatric Cancer and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We investigate the mechanisms by which normal cells become tumor cells, and we combine genetics, genomics, and proteomics approaches to investigate the differences between the proliferative response in response to injury and the hyperproliferative phenotype of cancer cells and to identify novel therapeutic targets in cancer cells.

  • Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Shelagh Galligan Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the molecular pathways that regulate normal and aberrant blood cell development, including acute leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. We are also studying novel drugs for treatment of cancer.

  • Julia Salzman

    Julia Salzman

    Associate Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Circular RNA regulation and function; computational and experimental approaches

  • Peter L. Santa Maria, MD, PhD

    Peter L. Santa Maria, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study chronic suppurative otitis media, a chronic biofilm infection of the middle ear predominantly involving pseudomonas and staph aureus. We are investigating mechanisms of sensory hearing loss, host microbe interactions and trialling novel therapeutics.

    Our work in tympanic membrane regeneration has entered clinical trials.

    Novel treatments for wound healing in intra oral wounds with potential applications to prevent post tonsillectomy wound healing and oral mucositis.

  • Kavita Sarin, MD, PhD

    Kavita Sarin, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research encompasses two main areas: 1) Using next-generation RNA, whole genome, and exome sequencing, we are investigating the genetic alterations involved in skin cancer progression, response to therapy, and other clinical outcomes and 2) We are developing and implementing genome-wide genetic risk prediction assessments for skin cancer into clinical use and studying the impact of this information on patient care.

  • Peter Sarnow

    Peter Sarnow

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory studies virus-host interactions with an emphasis microRNA-mediated gene regulation and on translational control. The mechanism by which a liver-specific microRNA regulates hepatitis C virus genome replication is under intense scrutiny. In addition, the mechanism of internal ribosome entry in certain cellular and viral mRNAs and its biological role in growth and development is being investigated.

  • Ansuman Satpathy

    Ansuman Satpathy

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab works at the interface of immunology, cancer biology, and genomics to study cellular and molecular mechanisms of the immune response to cancer. In particular, we are leveraging high-throughput genomic technologies to understand the dynamics of the tumor-specific T cell response to cancer antigens and immunotherapies (checkpoint blockade, CAR-T cells, and others). We are also interested in understanding the impact of immuno-editing on the heterogeneity and clonal evolution of cancer.

    We previously developed genome sequencing technologies that enable epigenetic studies in primary human immune cells from patients: 1) 3D enhancer-promoter interaction profiling (Nat Genet, 2017), 2) paired epigenome and T cell receptor (TCR) profiling in single cells (Nat Med, 2018), 3) paired epigenome and CRISPR profiling in single cells (Cell, 2019), and high-throughput single-cell ATAC-seq in droplets (Nature Biotech, 2019). We used these tools to study fundamental principles of the T cell response to cancer immunotherapy (PD-1 blockade) directly in cancer patient samples (Nature Biotech, 2019; Nat Med, 2019).

  • Lidia Schapira

    Lidia Schapira

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio I am a medical oncologist focused on breast cancer and cancer survivorship. My career goal is to improve outcomes and experiences of patients and caregivers living with and beyond cancer, and my research and scholarship have contributed to understanding and meeting the needs of the growing population of cancer survivors. My editorial work for the Journal of Clinical Oncology has given me the opportunity to shape the discourse in oncology and as Editor-in-Chief of Cancer.Net I can bring high quality information about cancer to the lay public.

  • Gary Schoolnik

    Gary Schoolnik

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Structure-function analysis of bacterial adhesion proteins and toxins; design and synthesis of synthetic antigens; immunobiology of human papillomaviruses

  • Deborah Sellmeyer

    Deborah Sellmeyer

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    Bio Dr. Sellmeyer is an internationally recognized expert in Metabolic Bone Disease. She is a renowned clinician who joined the Stanford faculty in 2018 as a Professor of Medicine. She has been recognized for her clinical excellence with induction into the Miller Coulson Academy of Clinical Excellence while she was at Johns Hopkins. In addition to her clinical expertise, Dr. Sellmeyer maintains a research program that centers on the effect of nutrition and environmental factors on skeletal metabolism which she has investigated through both smaller CRC-based trials and large multi-center trials. Studies she has conducted have investigated the role of dietary sodium chloride, source of dietary protein (animal, vegetable, dairy, soy), role of dietary potassium and alkaline potassium salts, targeted thoracic exercises on kyphosis, whether structured exercise can prevent bone loss in premenopausal women treated for breast cancer, and studies validating nutritional assessment questionnaires. Her expertise as a clinical researcher has enabled development of a multi-disciplinary translational research team including basic scientists in the orthopedic department, junior faculty members with K grant funding, and basic scientists in the endocrine division to develop translational projects studying the effects of osteoporosis medications on basic elements of skeletal biology utilizing bone biopsies from treated individuals as well as clinical trials of novel therapies for rare bone disorders. Dr. Sellmeyer also is a esteemed educator, having received multiple teaching awards.

  • Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We analyze multiple types of health data (EHR, Claims, Wearables, Weblogs, and Patient blogs), to answer clinical questions, generate insights, and build predictive models for the learning health system.

  • Sumit Shah

    Sumit Shah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    Bio Dr. Sumit Shah specializes in the management of advanced urologic malignancies such as prostate, kidney, bladder, and testicular cancers. He also serves as an investigator on numerous clinical trials, with a focus on novel immunotherapy agents. His academic interests also include digital health technologies and novel healthcare delivery services, both in the domestic and international setting. Dr. Shah graduated with distinction in biomedical engineering from Duke University, received his medical doctorate from Stanford University, and Masters in Public Health from Harvard University. He completed his internal medicine residency at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) where he stayed on faculty for one year before returning to Stanford for his fellowship training in medical oncology, where he now serves on the faculty.

  • Andrew A. Shelton, MD, FACS, FACRS

    Andrew A. Shelton, MD, FACS, FACRS

    Clinical Professor, Surgery - General Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Multimodality treatment of rectal cancer
    Sphincter preserving procedures for rectal cancer
    Laparoscopic colon and rectal surgery
    Surgical education

  • Jeanne Shen

    Jeanne Shen

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Gastrointestinal and pancreatobiliary pathology, with major emphasis on GI and pancreatic neoplasia, inflammatory bowel disease, biodesign innovation, and the application of machine learning to digital pathology.

  • Gavin Sherlock

    Gavin Sherlock

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Evolution and the adaptive landscape using yeast as a model; Defining yeast transcriptomes; chromosomal evolution in hybrid yeast species

  • Judith Shizuru

    Judith Shizuru

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy) and of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Transplantation of defined populations of allogeneic hematopoietic cells. Specifically, the way in which hematopoietic cell grafts alter antigen specific immune responses to allo-, auto- and viral antigens. The cellular and molecular basis of resistance to engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells.

  • Linda M. Dairiki Shortliffe

    Linda M. Dairiki Shortliffe

    Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor in the School of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The timing for intervention in obstruction in the infant and child is poorly understood.Our group has been interested in trying to define the risks that may be involved in obstructive and infectious uropathies and discovering early signs of damage to the urinary tract and kidney. We have explored ways of imaging the urinary tract using nonionizing radiation (US, MRI). We have studied the relationships of sex steroid hormones, pregnancy, reflux, urinary tract infection and urinary tract function.

  • Joseph Shrager

    Joseph Shrager

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In clinical research, Dr. Shrager has been an innovator studying outcomes in a variety of areas within Thoracic Surgery including: parenchyma-sparing operations and minimally invasive resections for lung cancer, transcervical thymectomy for myasthenia gravis, and surgical treatment of emphysema.

    In the lab, Dr. Shrager is focused on the impact of disease states upon the diaphragm. His group published the seminal paper (NEJM) describing diaphragm atrophy assoc'd with mechanical ventilation.

  • Arend Sidow

    Arend Sidow

    Professor of Pathology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We have a highly collaborative research program in the evolutionary genomics of cancer. We apply well-established principles of phylogenetics to cancer evolution on the basis of whole genome sequencing and functional genomics data of multiple tumor samples from the same patient. Introductions to our work and the concepts we apply are best found in the Newburger et al paper in Genome Research and the Sidow and Spies review in TIGS.

    More information can be found here: http://www.sidowlab.org

  • Branimir I. Sikic, M. D.

    Branimir I. Sikic, M. D.

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research Interests: cancer pharmacology, mechanisms of resistance to anticancer drugs, regulation and function of MDR1 and tubulin genes, CD47 as a target for activation of anticancer macrophases, Phase I trials of new drugs, gene expression profiling of cancers

  • Bob Sinclair

    Bob Sinclair

    Charles M. Pigott Professor in the School of Engineering

    Bio Using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Sinclair studies microelectronic and magnetic thin film microstructure.

  • Eila C. Skinner

    Eila C. Skinner

    Thomas A. Stamey Research Professor in Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on outcomes in the treatment of muscle invasive and high-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. This includes identifying markers of prognosis, predictive markers for response to surgery and chemotherapy, and working toward an individualized, multidisciplinary approach to disease management. I have also focused on optimizing the use of lower urinary tract reconstruction in patients undergoing cystectomy, and developing interventions to improve patient quality of life.

  • Stephen Skirboll

    Stephen Skirboll

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on screening strategies to identify and characterize cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human gliomas. We are pursuing this in several ways: 1) a novel colony-forming antibody live cell array to identify distinct CSC surface phenotypes, 2) RNAi screens to identify kinases critical for CSC tumorigenicity, 3) high throughput small molecule and chemical screens to identify compounds that selectively kill or target CSCs, and 4) identifying CSCs using the tumor specific EGFRvIII

  • Jan Skotheim

    Jan Skotheim

    Professor of Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My overarching goal is to understand how cell growth triggers cell division. Linking growth to division is important because it allows cells to maintain specific size range to best perform their physiological functions. For example, red blood cells must be small enough to flow through small capillaries, whereas macrophages must be large enough to engulf pathogens. In addition to being important for normal cell and tissue physiology, the link between growth and division is misregulated in cancer.

  • Michael Snyder

    Michael Snyder

    Stanford W. Ascherman, MD, FACS, Professor in Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Samuel So, MD

    Samuel So, MD

    Lui Hac Minh Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Through a 4 pronged comprehensive program: translational and clinical research, early detection and treatment, promoting education, awareness and immunization and building partnership, we are working towards the development of new strategies that will lead to the elimination of hepatitis B worldwide and reduce the threat and incidence of liver cancer. Current research efforts focus on evaluating potential new diagnostic and treatment markers and novel targeted therapy for primary liver cancer.

  • Hyongsok Tom  Soh

    Hyongsok Tom Soh

    Professor of Radiology (Early Detection), of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Bio Dr. Soh received his B.S. with a double major in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science with Distinction from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. From 1999 to 2003, Dr. Soh served as the technical manager of MEMS Device Research Group at Bell Laboratories and Agere Systems. He was a faculty member at UCSB before joining Stanford in 2015. His current research interests are in analytical biotechnology, especially in high-throughput screening, directed evolution, and integrated biosensors.

  • Olav Solgaard

    Olav Solgaard

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Bio The Solgaard group focus on design and fabrication of nano-photonics and micro-optical systems. We combine photonic crystals, optical meta-materials, silicon photonics, and MEMS, to create efficient and reliable systems for communication, sensing, imaging, and optical manipulation.

  • Scott G. Soltys, MD

    Scott G. Soltys, MD

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical and research interests focus on the development of new radiation techniques involving stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant and benign tumors of the brain and spine, as well as functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia.

  • Geoffrey Sonn

    Geoffrey Sonn

    Assistant Professor of Urology and, by courtesy, of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My interest is in improving prostate cancer diagnosis through MRI and image-targeted prostate biopsy. In collaboration with radiologists at Stanford, we are working to define the optimal role of MRI in prostate cancer. We hope to improve cancer imaging to the point that some men with elevated PSA may safely avoid prostate biopsy. For those who need biopsy, we are evaluating novel MRI-US fusion targeted biopsy, a technique that greatly improves upon the conventional biopsy method.

  • David Spiegel

    David Spiegel

    Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Spiegel's research program involves mind/body interactions, including cancer progression, the response to traumatic stress, and the effect of hypnosis on the perception of pain and anxiety.

  • Daniel Spielman

    Daniel Spielman

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests are in the field of medical imaging, particularly magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. Current projects include MRI and MRS at high magnetic fields and metabolic imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled MRS.

  • James Spudich

    James Spudich

    Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Disease

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The general research interest of this laboratory is the molecular basis of cell motility, with a current emphasis on power output by the human heart. We have three specific research interests, the molecular basis of energy transduction that leads to ATP-driven myosin movement on actin, the biochemical basis of the regulation of actin and myosin interaction and their assembly states, and the roles these proteins play in vivo, in cell movement, changes in cell shape and muscle contraction.

  • Sheri Spunt

    Sheri Spunt

    Endowed Professor of Pediatric Cancer

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses primarily on the management of children, adolescents, and young adults with soft tissue sarcomas. I also have an interest in developmental therapeutics and late effects of cancer therapy,

  • Sandy Srinivas

    Sandy Srinivas

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical interests: general oncology, genito-urinary malignancy Research interests: conducting clinical trials in advanced prostate cancer, bladder cancer and renal cell carcinoma

  • Randall Stafford

    Randall Stafford

    Professor of Medicine (Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As Director of the SPRC Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, my work focuses on cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention, the adoption of new technology and practices, and patterns of physician practice, particularly medication prescribing. Specific interests include measuring and improving the quality of outpatient care, disparities in health care by race, gender, age and socioeconomic status, and interventions to improve prevention outcomes.

  • Tim Stearns

    Tim Stearns

    Frank Lee and Carol Hall Professor, Senior Associate Vice Provost of Research and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We use the tools of genetics, microscopy, and biochemistry to understand fundamental questions of cell biology: How are cells organized by the cytoskeleton? How do the centrosome and cilium control cell control cell signaling? How is cell division coordinated with duplication of the centrosome, and what goes wrong in cancer cells defective in this coordination?

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D is a Professor of Medicine Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and by courtesy, Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Stefanick’s research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. She is currently the Principal Investigator the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Extension Study, having been the PI of the Stanford Clinical Center of the landmark WHI Clinical Trials and Observational Study since 1994 and Chair of the WHI Steering and Executive Committees from 1998-2011, as well as PI of the WHI Strong and Healthy (WHISH) Trial which is testing the hypothesis that a DHHS-based physical activity intervention, being delivered to a multi-ethnic cohort of about 24,000 WHI participants across the U.S., aged 68-99 when the trial started in 2015, will reduce major cardiovascular events over 8 years, compared to an equal number of “usual activity” controls. Dr. Stefanick is also PI of the Osteoporotic Study of Men (MrOS) which is continuing to conduct clinical assessments of bone and body composition in survivors of an original cohort of nearly 6000 men aged 65 and over in 2001. As founding Director of the Stanford Women’s Health and Sex Differences in Medicine (WHSDM, “wisdom”) Center, she plays a major role in promoting research and teaching on Sex and Gender in Human Physiology and Disease, Women’s Health and Queer Health and Medicine. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles at the Stanford School of Medicine, including as co-leader of the Population Sciences Program of the Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford’s NCI-funded comprehensive cancer center.

    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology, with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research led to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, which has been her academic home for nearly 40 years.

  • Tanya Stoyanova

    Tanya Stoyanova

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Cancer Early Detection-Canary Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Stoyanova lab develops new early cancer detection methods and therapeutic strategies for late stage cancers. The current research focus is on protein-based biomarkers for early cancer detection as well as development of new small molecule inhibitors and antibody-based therapies for prostate and other epithelial cancers. The ultimate goals of the laboratory are to improve the early diagnosis and prognosis of clinically significant cancers and guide the development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies for metastatic prostate and other epithelial cancers.

  • Aaron F. Straight

    Aaron F. Straight

    Professor of Biochemistry and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study the biology of chromosomes. Our research is focused on understanding how chromosomal domains are specialized for unique functions in chromosome segregation, cell division and cell differentiation. We are particularly interested in the genetic and epigenetic processes that govern vertebrate centromere function, in the organization of the genome in the eukaryotic nucleus and in the roles of RNAs in the regulation of chromosome structure.

  • Samuel Strober

    Samuel Strober

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanisms of immune tolerance; regulatory processes in autoimmunity and transplantation and extrathymic T cell maturation.

  • Zijie Sun

    Zijie Sun

    Professor of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We focus on understanding the molecular mechanism of transcription factors that govern the transformation of normal cells to a neoplastic state. We are especially interested in nuclear hormone action and its interactions with other signaling pathways in tumor development and progression.

  • John B. Sunwoo

    John B. Sunwoo

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory is focused on two primary areas of research: (1) the immune response to head and neck cancer and to a tumorigenic population of cells within these malignancies called cancer stem cells; (2) the developmental programs of a special lymphocyte population involved in innate immunity called natural killer (NK) cells; and (3) intra-tumor and inter-tumor heterogeneity.

  • James Swartz

    James Swartz

    James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Program Overview

    The world we enjoy, including the oxygen we breathe, has been beneficially created by biological systems. Consequently, we believe that innovative biotechnologies can also serve to help correct a natural world that non-natural technologies have pushed out of balance. We must work together to provide a sustainable world system capable of equitably improving the lives of over 10 billion people.
    Toward that objective, our program focuses on human health as well as planet health. To address particularly difficult challenges, we seek to synergistically combine: 1) the design and evolution of complex protein-based nanoparticles and enzymatic systems with 2) innovative, uniquely capable cell-free production technologies.
    To advance human health we focus on: a) achieving the 120 year-old dream of producing “magic bullets”; smart nanoparticles that deliver therapeutics or genetic therapies only to specific cells in our bodies; b) precisely designing and efficiently producing vaccines that mimic viruses to stimulate safe and protective immune responses; and c) providing a rapid point-of-care liquid biopsy that will count and harvest circulating tumor cells.
    To address planet health we are pursuing biotechnologies to: a) inexpensively use atmospheric CO2 to produce commodity biochemicals as the basis for a new carbon negative chemical industry, and b) mitigate the intermittency challenges of photovoltaic and wind produced electricity by producing hydrogen either from biomass sugars or directly from sunlight.
    More than 25 years ago, Professor Swartz began his pioneering work to develop cell-free biotechnologies. The new ability to precisely focus biological systems toward efficiently addressing new, “non-natural” objectives has proven tremendously useful as we seek to address the crucial and very difficult challenges listed above. Another critical feature of the program is the courage (or naivete) to approach important objectives that require the development and integration of several necessary-but- not-sufficient technology advances.

  • Susan M. Swetter, MD

    Susan M. Swetter, MD

    Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1) Early detection of melanoma through enhanced screening, novel imaging technologies, and professional/public education to improve melanoma awareness. 2) Therapeutic prevention of melanoma and other skin cancers in high-risk groups. 4) Epidemiologic and sociodemographic melanoma risk factors. 4) Dermatologist liaison to ECOG-ACRIN Melanoma Committee and Co-founder/Co-Director of the national Melanoma Prevention Working Group, an interdisciplinary collaboration dedicated to melanoma control.

  • Karl Sylvester

    Karl Sylvester

    Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One of the current primary interests of the lab is to investigate the mechanisms by which hepatocellular injury and recovery is influenced and controlled by hepatocyte metabolism.

    A second focus of investigation is to identify molecular markers of human disease that provide diagnostic function, serve as targets for possible therapeutic manipulation, or provide insight into mechanisms of human disease. Specific diseases of interest include newborn sepsis and Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC).

  • Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Professor of Radiology (Interventional Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Transarterial administration of chemotherapeutics, radioactive microspheres, and biologics for the treatment of unresectable tumors; management of portal hypertension and complications of cirrhosis (TIPS); treatment of complications of organ transplantation; Venous and pulmonary arterial thrombolysis and reconstruction; Stent and Stent-graft treatment of peripheral vascular diseases, aneurysms, aortic dissections

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