School of Medicine


Showing 391-400 of 440 Results

  • Samuel Strober

    Samuel Strober

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanisms of immune tolerance; regulatory processes in autoimmunity and transplantation and extrathymic T cell maturation.

  • Zijie Sun

    Zijie Sun

    Professor of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We focus on understanding the molecular mechanism of transcription factors that govern the transformation of normal cells to a neoplastic state. We are especially interested in nuclear hormone action and its interactions with other signaling pathways in tumor development and progression.

  • John B. Sunwoo

    John B. Sunwoo

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory is focused on two primary areas of research: (1) the immune response to head and neck cancer and to a tumorigenic population of cells within these malignancies called cancer stem cells; (2) the developmental programs of a special lymphocyte population involved in innate immunity called natural killer (NK) cells; and (3) intra-tumor and inter-tumor heterogeneity.

  • James Swartz

    James Swartz

    James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Program Overview

    The world we enjoy, including the oxygen we breathe, has been beneficially created by biological systems. Consequently, we believe that innovative biotechnologies can also serve to help correct a natural world that non-natural technologies have pushed out of balance. We must work together to provide a sustainable world system capable of equitably improving the lives of over 10 billion people.
    Toward that objective, our program focuses on human health as well as planet health. To address particularly difficult challenges, we seek to synergistically combine: 1) the design and evolution of complex protein-based nanoparticles and enzymatic systems with 2) innovative, uniquely capable cell-free production technologies.
    To advance human health we focus on: a) achieving the 120 year-old dream of producing “magic bullets”; smart nanoparticles that deliver therapeutics or genetic therapies only to specific cells in our bodies; b) precisely designing and efficiently producing vaccines that mimic viruses to stimulate safe and protective immune responses; and c) providing a rapid point-of-care liquid biopsy that will count and harvest circulating tumor cells.
    To address planet health we are pursuing biotechnologies to: a) inexpensively use atmospheric CO2 to produce commodity biochemicals as the basis for a new carbon negative chemical industry, and b) mitigate the intermittency challenges of photovoltaic and wind produced electricity by producing hydrogen either from biomass sugars or directly from sunlight.
    More than 25 years ago, Professor Swartz began his pioneering work to develop cell-free biotechnologies. The new ability to precisely focus biological systems toward efficiently addressing new, “non-natural” objectives has proven tremendously useful as we seek to address the crucial and very difficult challenges listed above. Another critical feature of the program is the courage (or naivete) to approach important objectives that require the development and integration of several necessary-but- not-sufficient technology advances.

  • Susan M. Swetter, MD

    Susan M. Swetter, MD

    Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1) Early detection of melanoma through enhanced screening, novel imaging technologies, and professional/public education to improve melanoma awareness. 2) Therapeutic prevention of melanoma and other skin cancers in high-risk groups. 4) Epidemiologic and sociodemographic melanoma risk factors. 4) Dermatologist liaison to ECOG-ACRIN Melanoma Committee and Co-founder/Co-Director of the national Melanoma Prevention Working Group, an interdisciplinary collaboration dedicated to melanoma control.

  • Karl Sylvester

    Karl Sylvester

    Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One of the current primary interests of the lab is to investigate the mechanisms by which hepatocellular injury and recovery is influenced and controlled by hepatocyte metabolism.

    A second focus of investigation is to identify molecular markers of human disease that provide diagnostic function, serve as targets for possible therapeutic manipulation, or provide insight into mechanisms of human disease. Specific diseases of interest include newborn sepsis and Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC).

  • Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Professor of Radiology (Interventional Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Transarterial administration of chemotherapeutics, radioactive microspheres, and biologics for the treatment of unresectable tumors; management of portal hypertension and complications of cirrhosis (TIPS); treatment of complications of organ transplantation; Venous and pulmonary arterial thrombolysis and reconstruction; Stent and Stent-graft treatment of peripheral vascular diseases, aneurysms, aortic dissections

  • Hua Tang

    Hua Tang

    Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Develop statistical and computational methods for population genomics analyses; modeling human evolutionary history; genetic association studies in admixed populations.

  • Jean Y. Tang MD PhD

    Jean Y. Tang MD PhD

    Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on 2 main areas:

    1. Skin cancer:
    - New therapeutics to treat and prevent non-melanoma skin cancer, especially by targeting the Hedgehog signaling pathway for BCC tumors
    - Genomic analysis of drug-resistant cancers
    - Identifying risk factors for skin cancer in the Women's Health Initiative

    2. Epidermolysis Bullosa: gene therapy and protein therapy to replace defective/absent Collagen 7 in children and adults with Recessive Dystrophic EB

  • Melinda L. Telli, M.D.

    Melinda L. Telli, M.D.

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the development of novel therapies for the treatment of triple-negative and hereditary cancer. Other areas of interest include prevention of cardiac damage associated with breast cancer treatment and cardiotoxicity of anti-cancer agents.

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