Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Clinical Molecular Genetics
  • Clinical Cytogenetics
  • Clinical Pathology

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Fellowship: UCLA David Geffen School Of Medicine Registrar (2006) CA
  • Fellowship: UCLA David Geffen School Of Medicine Registrar (2005) CA
  • PhD Training: Albert Einstein College of Medicine (2002) NY
  • Board Certification: American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics, Clinical Molecular Genetics (2018)
  • Board Certification, Clinical Molecular Genetics, American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics (2007)
  • Board Certification: American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics, Clinical Cytogenetics (2005)

Publications

All Publications


  • Identification of a pathogenic TUBB1 variant in a Chinese family with congenital macrothrombocytopenia through whole genome sequencing. Platelets Hou, Y. n., Shao, L. n., Zhou, H. n., Liu, Y. n., Fisk, D. G., Spiteri, E. n., Zehnder, J. L., Peng, J. n., Zhang, B. M., Hou, M. n. 2021: 1–5

    Abstract

    Congenital macrothrombocytopenia is a genetically heterogeneous group of rare disorders. We herein report a large Chinese family presented with phenotypic variability involving thrombocytopenia and/or giant platelets. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) of the proband and one of his affected brothers identified a potentially pathogenic c.952 C > T heterozygous variant in the TUBB1 gene. This p.R318W β1-tubulin variant was also identified in three additional siblings and five members of the next generation. These findings were consistent with an autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Moreover, impaired platelet agglutination in response to ristocetin was detected in the patient's brother. Half of the family members harboring the p.R318W mutation displayed significantly decreased external release of p-selectin by stimulated platelets. The p.R318W β1-tubulin mutation was identified for the first time in a Chinese family with congenital macrothrombocytopenia using WGS as an unbiased sequencing approach. Affected individuals within the family demonstrated impaired platelet aggregation and/or release functions.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/09537104.2020.1869714

    View details for PubMedID 33400601

  • Biallelic UBE4A loss-of-function variants cause intellectual disability and global developmental delay. Genetics in medicine : official journal of the American College of Medical Genetics Melo, U. S., Bonner, D. n., Kent Lloyd, K. C., Moshiri, A. n., Willis, B. n., Lanoue, L. n., Bower, L. n., Leonard, B. C., Martins, D. J., Gomes, F. n., de Souza Leite, F. n., Oliveira, D. n., Kitajima, J. P., Monteiro, F. P., Zatz, M. n., Menck, C. F., Wheeler, M. T., Bernstein, J. A., Dumas, K. n., Spiteri, E. n., Di Donato, N. n., Jahn, A. n., Hashem, M. n., Alsaif, H. S., Chedrawi, A. n., Alkuraya, F. S., Kok, F. n., Byers, H. M. 2021

    Abstract

    To identify novel genes associated with intellectual disability (ID) in four unrelated families.Here, through exome sequencing and international collaboration, we report eight individuals from four unrelated families of diverse geographic origin with biallelic loss-of-function variants in UBE4A.Eight evaluated individuals presented with syndromic intellectual disability and global developmental delay. Other clinical features included hypotonia, short stature, seizures, and behavior disorder. Characteristic features were appreciated in some individuals but not all; in some cases, features became more apparent with age. We demonstrated that UBE4A loss-of-function variants reduced RNA expression and protein levels in clinical samples. Mice generated to mimic patient-specific Ube4a loss-of-function variant exhibited muscular and neurological/behavioral abnormalities, some of which are suggestive of the clinical abnormalities seen in the affected individuals.These data indicate that biallelic loss-of-function variants in UBE4A cause a novel intellectual disability syndrome, suggesting that UBE4A enzyme activity is required for normal development and neurological function.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41436-020-01047-z

    View details for PubMedID 33420346

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