Bio

Bio


Evelyn Ling, M.D., M.S. is a Clinical Instructor at Stanford School of Medicine. She completed her M.D. degree and her internal medicine residency at the University of California at Davis in 2017. Prior to her medical training, she received her B.S. in biomedical computation and M.S. in Management Science and Engineering from Stanford University. In medical school and residency, she worked on projects in quality improvement (medication reconciliation in the hospital setting), medical education (clinical reasoning development) and health care technology (remote diabetes management). At SHC-ValleyCare, she has continues to be involved in medical education as the site co-director for Practice of Medicine course (POM) for second year physician assistant students. She also has been involved in clinical research, serving as a subinvestigator for the Adaptable COVID Treatment Trial (ACTT) for COVID therapeutics for hospitalized patients. She has been the Medical Director for Research at SHC-VC since Dec 2020 She is a Bay Area native and is excited to be working with the East Bay community.

Clinical Focus


  • Internal Medicine
  • Hospital Medicine

Academic Appointments


  • Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

Administrative Appointments


  • Medical Director of Research, SHC-ValleyCare (2020 - Present)
  • Site Co-Director, Practice of Medicine Y2; Practicum (2018 - Present)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member, SHC-VC Strategy for Research & Education Work Group (2019 - 2020)
  • Physician Co-Champion, SHC-VC Research Committee (2019 - 2020)

Professional Education


  • Medical Education: University of California Davis School of Medicine (2014) CA
  • Board Certification: American Board of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine (2017)
  • Residency: UC Davis Internal Medicine Residency (2017) CA

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


My current research interests are in clinical trials related to COVID19 and hospitalized patients.

Clinical Trials


  • Adaptive COVID-19 Treatment Trial 2 (ACTT-2) Recruiting

    ACTT-2 will evaluate the combination of baricitinib and remdesivir compared to remdesivir alone. Subjects will be assessed daily while hospitalized. If the subjects are discharged from the hospital, they will have a study visit at Days 15, 22, and 29. For discharged subjects, it is preferred that the Day 15 and 29 visits are in person to obtain safety laboratory tests and oropharyngeal (OP) swab and blood (serum only) samples for secondary research as well as clinical outcome data. However, infection control or other restrictions may limit the ability of the subject to return to the clinic. In this case, these visits may be conducted by phone, and only clinical data will be obtained. The Day 22 visit does not have laboratory tests or collection of samples and is conducted by phone. The primary outcome is time to recovery by Day 29.

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  • Adaptive COVID-19 Treatment Trial 3 (ACTT-3) Recruiting

    ACTT-3 will evaluate the combination of interferon beta-1a and remdesivir compared to remdesivir alone. Subjects will be assessed daily while hospitalized. If the subjects are discharged from the hospital, they will have a study visit at Days 15, 22, and 29. For discharged subjects, it is preferred that the Day 15 and 29 visits are in person to obtain safety laboratory tests and oropharyngeal (OP) swab and blood (serum only) samples for secondary research as well as clinical outcome data. However, infection control or other restrictions may limit the ability of the subject to return to the clinic. In this case, these visits may be conducted by phone, and only clinical data will be obtained. The Day 22 visit does not have laboratory tests or collection of samples and is conducted by phone. The primary outcome is time to recovery by Day 29.

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  • Adaptive COVID-19 Treatment Trial 4 (ACTT-4) Recruiting

    ACTT-4 will evaluate the combination of baricitinib and remdesivir compared to dexamethasone and remdesivir. Subjects will be assessed daily while hospitalized. If the subjects are discharged from the hospital, they will have a study visit at Days 15, 22, and 29. For discharged subjects, it is preferred that the Day 15 and 29 visits are in person to obtain safety laboratory tests, oropharyngeal (OP) swabs, plasma (Day 29), and serum for secondary research as well as clinical outcome data. However, if infection control or other restrictions limit the ability of the subject to return to the clinic, these visits may be conducted by phone, and only clinical data will be obtained. The Day 22 visit does not have laboratory tests or collection of samples and is conducted by phone. The primary objective is to evaluate the clinical efficacy of baricitinib + remdesivir versus dexamethasone + remdesivir as assessed by the mechanical ventilation free survival by Day 29.

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  • Adaptive COVID-19 Treatment Trial (ACTT) Not Recruiting

    This study is an adaptive, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of novel therapeutic agents in hospitalized adults diagnosed with COVID-19. The study is a multicenter trial that will be conducted in up to approximately 100 sites globally. The study will compare different investigational therapeutic agents to a control arm. There will be interim monitoring to introduce new arms and allow early stopping for futility, efficacy, or safety. If one therapy proves to be efficacious, then this treatment may become the control arm for comparison(s) with new experimental treatment(s). Any such change would be accompanied by an updated sample size. Because background standards of supportive care may evolve/improve over time as more is learned about successful management of COVID-19, comparisons of safety and efficacy will be based on data from concurrently randomized subjects. An independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) will actively monitor interim data to make recommendations about early study closure or changes to study arms. To evaluate the clinical efficacy, as assessed by time to recovery, of different investigational therapeutics as compared to the control arm.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact NIH sponsored, (650) 493 - 5000.

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Publications

All Publications


  • Remdesivir for the Treatment of Covid-19 - Preliminary Report. The New England journal of medicine Beigel, J. H., Tomashek, K. M., Dodd, L. E., Mehta, A. K., Zingman, B. S., Kalil, A. C., Hohmann, E. n., Chu, H. Y., Luetkemeyer, A. n., Kline, S. n., Lopez de Castilla, D. n., Finberg, R. W., Dierberg, K. n., Tapson, V. n., Hsieh, L. n., Patterson, T. F., Paredes, R. n., Sweeney, D. A., Short, W. R., Touloumi, G. n., Lye, D. C., Ohmagari, N. n., Oh, M. D., Ruiz-Palacios, G. M., Benfield, T. n., Fätkenheuer, G. n., Kortepeter, M. G., Atmar, R. L., Creech, C. B., Lundgren, J. n., Babiker, A. G., Pett, S. n., Neaton, J. D., Burgess, T. H., Bonnett, T. n., Green, M. n., Makowski, M. n., Osinusi, A. n., Nayak, S. n., Lane, H. C. 2020

    Abstract

    Although several therapeutic agents have been evaluated for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19), none have yet been shown to be efficacious.We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of intravenous remdesivir in adults hospitalized with Covid-19 with evidence of lower respiratory tract involvement. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either remdesivir (200 mg loading dose on day 1, followed by 100 mg daily for up to 9 additional days) or placebo for up to 10 days. The primary outcome was the time to recovery, defined by either discharge from the hospital or hospitalization for infection-control purposes only.A total of 1063 patients underwent randomization. The data and safety monitoring board recommended early unblinding of the results on the basis of findings from an analysis that showed shortened time to recovery in the remdesivir group. Preliminary results from the 1059 patients (538 assigned to remdesivir and 521 to placebo) with data available after randomization indicated that those who received remdesivir had a median recovery time of 11 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 9 to 12), as compared with 15 days (95% CI, 13 to 19) in those who received placebo (rate ratio for recovery, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.55; P<0.001). The Kaplan-Meier estimates of mortality by 14 days were 7.1% with remdesivir and 11.9% with placebo (hazard ratio for death, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.47 to 1.04). Serious adverse events were reported for 114 of the 541 patients in the remdesivir group who underwent randomization (21.1%) and 141 of the 522 patients in the placebo group who underwent randomization (27.0%).Remdesivir was superior to placebo in shortening the time to recovery in adults hospitalized with Covid-19 and evidence of lower respiratory tract infection. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and others; ACCT-1 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04280705.).

    View details for DOI 10.1056/NEJMoa2007764

    View details for PubMedID 32445440

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7262788

  • Baricitinib plus Remdesivir for Hospitalized Adults with Covid-19. The New England journal of medicine Kalil, A. C., Patterson, T. F., Mehta, A. K., Tomashek, K. M., Wolfe, C. R., Ghazaryan, V. n., Marconi, V. C., Ruiz-Palacios, G. M., Hsieh, L. n., Kline, S. n., Tapson, V. n., Iovine, N. M., Jain, M. K., Sweeney, D. A., El Sahly, H. M., Branche, A. R., Regalado Pineda, J. n., Lye, D. C., Sandkovsky, U. n., Luetkemeyer, A. F., Cohen, S. H., Finberg, R. W., Jackson, P. E., Taiwo, B. n., Paules, C. I., Arguinchona, H. n., Goepfert, P. n., Ahuja, N. n., Frank, M. n., Oh, M. D., Kim, E. S., Tan, S. Y., Mularski, R. A., Nielsen, H. n., Ponce, P. O., Taylor, B. S., Larson, L. n., Rouphael, N. G., Saklawi, Y. n., Cantos, V. D., Ko, E. R., Engemann, J. J., Amin, A. N., Watanabe, M. n., Billings, J. n., Elie, M. C., Davey, R. T., Burgess, T. H., Ferreira, J. n., Green, M. n., Makowski, M. n., Cardoso, A. n., de Bono, S. n., Bonnett, T. n., Proschan, M. n., Deye, G. A., Dempsey, W. n., Nayak, S. U., Dodd, L. E., Beigel, J. H. 2020

    Abstract

    Severe coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is associated with dysregulated inflammation. The effects of combination treatment with baricitinib, a Janus kinase inhibitor, plus remdesivir are not known.We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial evaluating baricitinib plus remdesivir in hospitalized adults with Covid-19. All the patients received remdesivir (≤10 days) and either baricitinib (≤14 days) or placebo (control). The primary outcome was the time to recovery. The key secondary outcome was clinical status at day 15.A total of 1033 patients underwent randomization (with 515 assigned to combination treatment and 518 to control). Patients receiving baricitinib had a median time to recovery of 7 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 6 to 8), as compared with 8 days (95% CI, 7 to 9) with control (rate ratio for recovery, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.32; P = 0.03), and a 30% higher odds of improvement in clinical status at day 15 (odds ratio, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0 to 1.6). Patients receiving high-flow oxygen or noninvasive ventilation at enrollment had a time to recovery of 10 days with combination treatment and 18 days with control (rate ratio for recovery, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.10 to 2.08). The 28-day mortality was 5.1% in the combination group and 7.8% in the control group (hazard ratio for death, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.39 to 1.09). Serious adverse events were less frequent in the combination group than in the control group (16.0% vs. 21.0%; difference, -5.0 percentage points; 95% CI, -9.8 to -0.3; P = 0.03), as were new infections (5.9% vs. 11.2%; difference, -5.3 percentage points; 95% CI, -8.7 to -1.9; P = 0.003).Baricitinib plus remdesivir was superior to remdesivir alone in reducing recovery time and accelerating improvement in clinical status among patients with Covid-19, notably among those receiving high-flow oxygen or noninvasive ventilation. The combination was associated with fewer serious adverse events. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04401579.).

    View details for DOI 10.1056/NEJMoa2031994

    View details for PubMedID 33306283

  • From Paper to EHR: A Millennial's Perspective Ling, E., Cha, A., Ahuja, N. Medscape. Medscape Hospital Medicine. 2019 ; Perspective
  • Man's best friend, fatal in the end. Cleveland Clinic journal of medicine Ling, E. n., Howell, S. n., Vang, M. n., Aronowitz, P. n. 2017; 84 (2): 146–50

    View details for DOI 10.3949/ccjm.84a.16061

    View details for PubMedID 28198689

  • Too Fast for Comfort: Tachycardia in Postablation Wolff-Parkinson-White. The American journal of medicine Ling, E. B., Stayton, T. L., Stripe, B. R., Srivatsa, U. n., Amsterdam, E. A., Venugopal, S. n. 2016; 129 (11): e269–e272

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjmed.2016.05.026

    View details for PubMedID 27296330

  • Mice lacking the beta 2 adrenergic receptor have a unique genetic profile before and after focal brain ischaemia ASN NEURO White, R. E., Palm, C., Xu, L., Ling, E., Ginsburg, M., Daigle, B. J., Han, R., Patterson, A., Altman, R. B., Giffard, R. G. 2012; 4 (5): 343-356

    View details for DOI 10.1042/AN20110020

    View details for Web of Science ID 000308887200005

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