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School of Medicine


Showing 41-59 of 59 Results

  • Joseph (Joe) Lipsick

    Joseph (Joe) Lipsick

    Professor of Pathology, of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Function and evolution of the Myb oncogene family; function and evolution of E2F transcriptional regulators and RB tumor suppressors; epigenetic regulation of chromatin and chromosomes; cancer genetics.

  • Stephen B. Montgomery

    Stephen B. Montgomery

    Associate Professor of Pathology, of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We focus on understanding the effects of genome variation on cellular phenotypes and cellular modeling of disease through genomic approaches such as next generation RNA sequencing in combination with developing and utilizing state-of-the-art bioinformatics and statistical genetics approaches. See our website at http://montgomerylab.stanford.edu/

  • Kelly E. Ormond, MS, CGC

    Kelly E. Ormond, MS, CGC

    Clinical Professor, Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am currently serving as the Research Director for the MS in Human Genetics and Genetic Counseling program. My research focuses on the intersection between genetics and ethics, particularly around the translation of new genetic technologies (such as genome sequencing, non-invasive prenatal diagnosis and gene editing) into clinical practice. I am especially interested in patient decision making, consent and disclosure of genetic test results, and the interface between genetics and disability.

  • John R. Pringle

    John R. Pringle

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Much of our research exploits the power of yeast as an experimentally tractable model eukaryote to investigate fundamental problems in cell and developmental biology such as the mechanisms of cell polarization and cytokinesis. In another project, we are developing the small sea anemone Aiptasia as a model system for study of the molecular and cellular biology of dinoflagellate-cnidarian symbiosis, which is critical for the survival of most corals but still very poorly understood.

  • Jonathan Pritchard

    Jonathan Pritchard

    Bing Professor of Population Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in a broad range of problems at the interface of genomics and evolutionary biology. One current focus of the lab is in understanding how genetic variation impacts gene regulation and complex traits. We also have long-term interests in using genetic data to learn about population structure, history and adaptation, especially in humans.

    FOR UP-TO-DATE DETAILS ON MY LAB AND RESEARCH, PLEASE SEE: http://pritchardlab.stanford.edu

  • Julien Sage

    Julien Sage

    Elaine and John Chambers Professor of Pediatric Cancer and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We investigate the mechanisms by which normal cells become tumor cells, and we combine genetics, genomics, and proteomics approaches to investigate the differences between the proliferative response in response to injury and the hyperproliferative phenotype of cancer cells and to identify novel therapeutic targets in cancer cells.

  • Gavin Sherlock

    Gavin Sherlock

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Evolution and the adaptive landscape using yeast as a model; Defining yeast transcriptomes; chromosomal evolution in hybrid yeast species

  • Arend Sidow

    Arend Sidow

    Professor of Pathology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We have a highly collaborative research program in the evolutionary genomics of cancer. We apply well-established principles of phylogenetics to cancer evolution on the basis of whole genome sequencing and functional genomics data of multiple tumor samples from the same patient. Introductions to our work and the concepts we apply are best found in the Newburger et al paper in Genome Research and the Sidow and Spies review in TIGS.

    More information can be found here: http://www.sidowlab.org

  • Michael Snyder

    Michael Snyder

    Stanford W. Ascherman, MD, FACS, Professor in Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Tim Stearns

    Tim Stearns

    Frank Lee and Carol Hall Professor, Senior Associate Vice Provost of Research and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We use the tools of genetics, microscopy, and biochemistry to understand fundamental questions of cell biology: How are cells organized by the cytoskeleton? How do the centrosome and cilium control cell control cell signaling? How is cell division coordinated with duplication of the centrosome, and what goes wrong in cancer cells defective in this coordination?

  • Lars Steinmetz

    Lars Steinmetz

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We apply diverse genomic approaches to understand how genetic variation affects health and disease by: 1) functional and mechanistic analyses of gene regulation, 2) studies of meiotic recombination and inheritance, 3) analyses of genetic and environmental interactions, and 4) characterization of diseases in human cells and model organisms. We integrate wet lab and computational genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic approaches, and develop technologies to enable personalized medicine.

  • Hua Tang

    Hua Tang

    Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Develop statistical and computational methods for population genomics analyses; modeling human evolutionary history; genetic association studies in admixed populations.

  • Alice Ting

    Alice Ting

    Professor of Genetics, of Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We develop chemogenetic and optogenetic technologies for probing and manipulating protein networks, cellular RNA, and the function of mitochondria and the mammalian brain. Our technologies draw from enzyme engineering, directed evolution, chemical biology, organic synthesis, high-resolution microscopy, genetics, and computational analysis.

  • Alexander Eckehart Urban

    Alexander Eckehart Urban

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Complex behavioral and neuropsychiatric phenotypes often have a strong genetic component. This genetic component is often extremely complex and difficult to dissect. The current revolution in genome technology means that we can avail ourselves to tools that make it possible for the first time to begin understanding the complex genetic and epigenetic interactions at the basis of the human mind.

  • Anne Villeneuve

    Anne Villeneuve

    Professor of Developmental Biology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanisms underlying homologous chromosome pairing, DNA recombination and chromosome remodeling during meiosis, using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an experimental system. High-resolution 3-D imaging of dynamic reorganization of chromosome architecture. Role of protease inhibitors in regulating sperm activation.

  • Douglas Vollrath

    Douglas Vollrath

    Associate Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Vollrath lab works to uncover molecular mechanisms relevant to the health and pathology of the outer retina. We study the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a cell monolayer adjacent to photoreceptors that performs a variety of tasks crucial for retinal homeostasis. Specific areas of interest include the circadian regulation of RPE phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segment tips, and how RPE metabolic dysfunction contributes to retinal degenerative diseases.

  • Monte Winslow

    Monte Winslow

    Associate Professor of Genetics and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory uses genome-wide methods to uncover alterations that drive cancer progression and metastasis in genetically-engineered mouse models of human cancers. We combine cell-culture based mechanistic studies with our ability to alter pathways of interest during tumor progression in vivo to better understand each step of metastatic spread and to uncover the therapeutic vulnerabilities of advanced cancer cells.

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