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School of Medicine


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  • Lucia Aronica

    Lucia Aronica

    Casual - Non-Exempt, Medicine - Med/Stanford Prevention Research Center

    Bio Over the past ten years my research has focused on the field of epigenetics, which investigates how environmental factors can affect gene activity thereby impacting our health and predisposition to diseases. Unlike genetic factors, epigenetic modifications are flexible and can store cell memories of life exposures such as diet, stress or environmental toxins. As such, they hold great potential in personalized health as biomarkers for exposure-driven chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

    I am currently leading the epigenetic analysis of the largest study ever undertaken in personalized nutrition on low carb vs. low fat diets ? the DIETFITS study by Prof Christopher Gardner. My primary goal is to understand how weight-loss affects gene activity through epigenetic modifications, and whether we can use these modifications to predict diet response for personalized weight-loss strategies.

    I also teach Nutritional Genomics at Stanford Continuing Studies, Stanford Sport Medicine and at the Stanford Center for Professional Development. An award-winning science communicator, I use creative forms of communication such as digital drawings to explain complex topics from the world of epigenetics and science. Finally, I serve as an advisor for personal genomics companies, self-tracking technology businesses, and companies interested in investing in precision health research.

  • Thomas Glynn

    Thomas Glynn

    Adjunct Lecturer, Medicine - Med/Stanford Prevention Research Center

    Bio Biosketch - Thomas J. Glynn, M.A., M.S., Ph.D. (psych.)

    Dr. Glynn is, from 2014 to the present, Adjunct Lecturer, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine and Executive Team Member, Mayo Clinic Global Bridges Initiative. From 1998 to 2014, he was Director, Cancer Science and Trends and Director, International Cancer Control at the American Cancer Society (ACS). In these positions, he advised the ACS about emerging research and policy issues in cancer prevention and control, recommended cancer prevention and control research and policies, and participated in the development of an international cancer control program aimed at promoting cancer prevention-related research, advocacy, treatment, and policy change, particularly in middle- and low-income nations.

    Prior to the ACS, Dr. Glynn was, from 1991 to 1994, Associate Director of the U.S. National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Cancer Control Science Program and, from 1991 to 1998, Chief of the NCI's Cancer Control Extramural Research Branch. There, he directed a national program of research aimed at reducing the incidence and prevalence of cancer, primarily through dietary change, tobacco use reduction, and adherence to cancer screening guidelines. From 1983 to 1991, he was Research Director for the NCI's Smoking, Tobacco, and Cancer Program and from 1978 to 1983, he was a Research Psychologist at the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

    Dr. Glynn has published widely on cancer and tobacco use prevention and control, both in the scientific literature and for consumer, professional, and patient education and is co-developer of the 4A (now 5A) protocol for the treatment of tobacco dependence. In addition to his work at the ACS and NCI, he has served as a consultant on cancer control and tobacco issues to such groups as the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the WHO, a variety of pharmaceutical organizations, and national, state and local governments.

    He has also served as a Senior Scientific Reviewer for the U.S. Surgeon General's Reports on Tobacco and Health, as Director of the World Health Organization Study of Health, Economic, and Policy Implications of Tobacco Growth and Consumption in Developing Countries, and has been active in tobacco control programs in Eastern Europe, Central America, and India. He is a Fellow of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco and his awards include the U.S. National Institutes of Health Merit Award, the Polish Ministry of Health Service Award, the Guatemala National Council for Tobacco Prevention and Control Meritorious Service Award, the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco John Slade Award, and the American Society of Preventive Oncology Joseph W. Cullen Memorial Award.

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