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School of Medicine


Showing 21-29 of 29 Results

  • Francesca Briganti

    Francesca Briganti

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Cardiovascular Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One gene can lead to the production of many different RNA isoforms via mechanisms such as alternative promoter usage, splicing, and polyadenylation. The functional significance of many of these isoforms, their impact on cell physiology, and their regulation remain mostly controversial. Understanding the functional consequences of transcript heterogeneity will improve our understanding of gene expression regulation, broadening our ability to intervene when mutations that interfere with this regulation cause human disease.
    My goal is to become an independent researcher leading an academic lab that focuses on better understanding human tissue-specific post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression and developing mechanism-based therapeutics. My general strategy is to study the function of regulatory genes and their deregulation in human disease. My specific approach is to understand the molecular mechanisms by which disease-causing mutations alter the gene function and lead to human disease. My hypothesis is that a detailed understanding of the relationship between the gene's molecular function and the disease mechanism will allow the development of first-in-class, personalized therapeutic strategies that target the disease mechanisms rather than manage symptoms independently of disease etiology.

  • Jessica Brodt

    Jessica Brodt

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical Education
    Regional Anesthesia for Cardiothoracic Enhanced Recovery (RACER)
    Anesthesia for transcatheter and electrophyiology procedures

  • Anne Brunet

    Anne Brunet

    Michele and Timothy Barakett Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab studies the molecular basis of longevity. We are interested in the mechanism of action of known longevity genes, including FOXO and SIRT, in the mammalian nervous system. We are particularly interested in the role of these longevity genes in neural stem cells. We are also discovering novel genes and processes involved in aging using two short-lived model systems, the invertebrate C. elegans and an extremely short-lived vertebrate, the African killifish N. furzeri.

  • Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goal of the Buckwalter Lab is to improve how people recover after a stroke. We use basic research to understand the cells, proteins, and genes that lead to successful recovery of function, and also how complications develop that impact quality of life after stroke. Ongoing projects are focused on understanding how inflammatory responses are regulated after a stroke and how to make recovery faster and better after stroke.

  • Thomas Burdon

    Thomas Burdon

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Adult Cardiac Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests New technologies in the area of catheters, clamps, and, visualization devices for aid in cardiac surgery; distribution of, cardioplegia, both anterograde and retrograde as determined by, techniques in technetium pyro-phosphate scans; glucose insulin, potassium as an adjunct in cardiac surgery.

  • Carlos Bustamante

    Carlos Bustamante

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My genetics research focuses on analyzing genome wide patterns of variation within and between species to address fundamental questions in biology, anthropology, and medicine. We focus on novel methods development for complex disease genetics and risk prediction in multi-ethnic settings. I am also interested in clinical data science and development of new diagnostics.I am also interested in disruptive innovation for healthcare including modeling long-term risk shifts and novel payment models.

  • Eugene Butcher

    Eugene Butcher

    Klaus Bensch Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our interests include:
    1) The physiology and function of lymphocyte homing in local and systemic immunity;
    2) Biochemical and genetic studies of molecules that direct leukocyte recruitment;
    3) Chemotactic mechanisms and receptors in vascular and immune biology;
    4) Vascular control of normal and pathologic inflammation and immunity;
    5) Systems biology of immune cell trafficking and programming in tumor immunity.

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