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School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 42 Results

  • Maha Hanna

    Maha Hanna

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests A bad latch means maternal excruciating pain, ineffective milk transfer with subsequent weight loss, hypoglycemia, higher risk of hyperbilirubinemia and dehydration fever.All of the above led to early cessation of breastfeeding; 46% of mothers who initiate exclusive breastfeeding stop within the first 12 weeks because of difficult latch. I developed a latch tutorial focusing on step-by step-in striations for achieving an effective, non-painful latch.

  • Antonio Hardan, M.D.

    Antonio Hardan, M.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The neurobiology of autism
    Neuroimaging in individuals with autism
    Psychopharmacological treatment of children and adults with autism and/or developmental disorders
    The neurobiology and innovative interventions of several neurogenic disorders including DiGeorge Syndrome (Velocardiofacial syndrome; 22q11.2 mutations), PTEN mutations, and Phelan McDermid Syndrome (22q13 mutations).

  • Keren Haroush

    Keren Haroush

    Assistant Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory studies the mechanisms by which highly complex behaviors are mediated at the neuronal level, mainly focusing on the example of dynamic social interactions and the neural circuits that drive them. From dyadic interactions to group dynamics and collective decision making, the lab seeks a mechanistic understanding for the fundamental building blocks of societies, such as cooperation, empathy, fairness and reciprocity.

  • Trevor Hastie

    Trevor Hastie

    John A. Overdeck Professor, Professor of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Flexible statistical modeling for prediction and representation of data arising in biology, medicine, science or industry. Statistical and machine learning tools have gained importance over the years. Part of Hastie's work has been to bridge the gap between traditional statistical methodology and the achievements made in machine learning.

  • Melanie Hayden Gephart

    Melanie Hayden Gephart

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Bio I am a brain tumor neurosurgeon, treating patients with malignant and benign tumors, including glioma, brain metastases, meningioma, vestibular schwannoma, and pituitary adenomas. Our lab seeks greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms driving tumorigenesis and disease progression in malignant brain tumors. We currently study the capacity of cellular and cell-free nucleic acids to inform cancer biology and response to therapy. We also use single cell and cell subtype-specific transcriptomics to identify and target infiltrating glioblastoma. We use these techniques to identify mechanisms of tumor migration, and to stop tumor growth. Our laboratory is a unique and collaborative working environment, engaged in a dynamic research environment at Stanford. Our laboratory space lies at the heart of the Stanford campus between the core campus and the medical facilities, emblematic of the translational aspects of our work.

    www.GephartLab.com
    www.GBMseq.org
    https://stan.md/BrainMets

  • Florette K. Gray Hazard

    Florette K. Gray Hazard

    Associate Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My scholarly pursuits are primarily focused on the study of death and disease in the pediatric population. It is through this work that I am able to explore fundamental concepts of neoplasia, such as histogenesis and mutagenesis, while utilizing a variety of investigational techniques.

  • John P. Hegarty II

    John P. Hegarty II

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Bio The overarching goal of my research is to identify neurobiological subgroups and develop objective biomarkers for individuals with psychiatric and neurological disorders in order to improve biologically-based diagnosis and advance the development of precision medicine for mental health. Biologically-based diagnosis and treatment are extremely limited for some psychiatric conditions, especially neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but also critically-needed to increase early identification and improve treatment outcomes. My early career training has focused on developing expertise in non-invasive neuroimaging approaches for examining participants ranging from young children to adults and my research has focused on identifying the neurobiology underlying typical and atypical neurodevelopment.

    Thus far in my early research career, my primary contributions to science fall within four major categories:
    1) identifying the neural correlates of different cognitive and behavioral deficits, 2) investigating the neurobiological substrates of treatment response, 3) examining the etiological factors that contribute to atypical brain development in children with autism, and 4) summarizing and increasing accessibility to autism-related research. My earliest research investigated the neurobiology associated with the cognitive deficits of alexithymia, dyslexia, and stress to further develop theories of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to differences in cognitive and behavioral processing. My subsequent dissertation research, in which I began to focus on neurodevelopmental disorders, examined the neural correlates of treatment response to beta-blockers in adults with ASD and also assessed the contribution of cerebellar circuits to autism-related symptoms, which is well-supported from postmortem studies but understudied in clinical populations. During my postdoctoral training, I have been further developing skills for working with young children with and without neurodevelopmental disorders as well as utilizing advanced neuroimaging and neurophysiological approaches to examine the biological mechanisms underlying different types of cognitive and behavioral symptoms. My most recent research has focused on examining the neural correlates of response to behavioral interventions as well as examining the etiological factors that contribute to atypical brain development in twins with autism. The independent line of research that I will continue to develop in my research lab will aim to improve our understanding of typical and atypical brain development and identify objective biomarkers for advancing precision medicine.

  • Sarah Heilshorn

    Sarah Heilshorn

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering and of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Protein engineering
    Tissue engineering
    Regenerative medicine
    Biomaterials

  • Wm. LeRoy Heinrichs

    Wm. LeRoy Heinrichs

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Surgical simulation; team-training in virtual environments; online training of healthcare providers in virtual environments; tele-medicine for acute & chronic disease management in virtual environments

  • Stefan Heller

    Stefan Heller

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on the inner ear, from its earliest manifestation as one of the cranial placodes until it has developed into a mature and functioning organ. We are interested how the sensory epithelia of the inner ear that harbor the sensory hair cells develop, how the cells mature, and how these epithelia respond to toxic insults. The overarching goal of this research is to find was to regenerate lost sensory hair cells in mammals.

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