ERROR! No headcode.htm file found.

School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 469 Results

  • Oliver O. Aalami, MD

    Oliver O. Aalami, MD

    Clinical Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We launched a national precision medicine PAD trial called, VascTrac (http://vasctrac.stanford.edu/). This trial is mobile phone based and leverages Apple's ResearchKit Platform to monitor a patient's activity both pre- and post-intervention. We are validating mobile phone surveillance for PAD patients and are currently enrolling.

  • Deborah Aarhus

    Deborah Aarhus

    Administrative Director, Vera Moulton Wall Center for Pulmonary Vascular Disease, CVI/Vera Moulton Wall Center

    Current Role at Stanford Administrative Director, Vera Moulton Wall Center for Pulmonary Vascular Disease at Stanford

  • Oscar J. Abilez

    Oscar J. Abilez

    Senior Research Scientist - Basic Life, Cardiovascular Institute Operations

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Abilez' interests are aimed at elucidating how various biophysical and biochemical perturbations regulate early cardiovascular development across time and length scales that span several orders of magnitude, using human pluripotent stem cells as a model system.

  • Kevin M. Alexander, MD, FACC, FHFSA

    Kevin M. Alexander, MD, FACC, FHFSA

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Alexander is an advanced heart failure-trained cardiologist. He is also an Assistant Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Alexander specializes in the management of advanced heart failure and transplant cases, seeing a wide range of patients. He also has an active research laboratory, studying various forms of heart failure.

    Dr. Alexander has expertise in diagnosing and treating transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis, a critical yet underdiagnosed cause of heart failure among African Americans and the elderly. He is conducting extensive research to enhance our understanding of this condition, with grant support from the National Institutes of Health and American Heart Association, among other sources.

  • Russ B. Altman

    Russ B. Altman

    Kenneth Fong Professor and Professor of Bioengineering, of Genetics, of Medicine (General Medical Discipline), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I refer you to my web page for detailed list of interests, projects and publications. In addition to pressing the link here, you can search "Russ Altman" on http://www.google.com/

  • Cristina M. Alvira

    Cristina M. Alvira

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The overall objective of the Alvira Laboratory is to elucidate the mechanisms that promote postnatal lung development and repair, by focusing on three main scientific goals: (i) identification of the signaling pathways that direct the transition between the saccular and alveolar stages of lung development; (ii) exploration of the interplay between postnatal vascular and alveolar development; and (iii) determination of developmentally regulated pathways that mediate lung repair after injury.

  • Katrin Andreasson

    Katrin Andreasson

    Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on understanding how immune responses initiate and accelerate synaptic and neuronal injury in age-related neurodegeneration, including models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. We also focus on the role of immune responses in aggravating brain injury in models of stroke. Our goal is the identification of critical immune pathways that function in neurologic disorders and that can be targeted to elicit disease modifying effects.

  • Timothy Angelotti MD, PhD

    Timothy Angelotti MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research efforts are focused on investigating the pharmacological and physiological interface of the autonomic nervous system with effector organs. Utilizing molecular, cellular, and electrophysiological techniques, we are examining alpha2 adrenergic receptor function in cultured sympathetic neurons. Future research aims will be directed toward understanding neurotransmitter release in general.

  • Martin S. Angst

    Martin S. Angst

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory's current transformative research efforts focus on studying immune health in the context of surgery and anesthesia.

  • Justin P. Annes M.D., Ph.D.

    Justin P. Annes M.D., Ph.D.

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The ANNES LABORATORY of Molecular Endocrinology: Leveraging Chemical Biology to Treat Endocrine Disorders

    DIABETES
    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing at a staggering rate. By the year 2050 an astounding 25% of Americans will be diabetic. The goal of my research is to uncover therapeutic strategies to stymie the ensuing diabetes epidemic. To achieve this goal we have developed a variety of innovate experimental approaches to uncover novel approaches to curing diabetes.

    (1) Beta-Cell Regeneration: Diabetes results from either an absolute or relative deficiency in insulin production. Our therapeutic strategy is to stimulate the regeneration of insulin-producing beta-cells to enhance an individual?s insulin secretion capacity. We have developed a unique high-throughput chemical screening platform which we use to identify small molecules that promote beta-cell growth. This work has led to the identification of key molecular pathways (therapeutic targets) and candidate drugs that promote the growth and regeneration of islet beta-cells. Our goal is to utilize these discoveries to treat and prevent diabetes.

    (2) The Metabolic Syndrome: A major cause of the diabetes epidemic is the rise in obesity which leads to a cluster of diabetes- and cardiovascular disease-related metabolic abnormalities that shorten life expectancy. These physiologic aberrations are collectively termed the Metabolic Syndrome (MS). My laboratory has developed an original in vivo screening platform t to identify novel hormones that influence the behaviors (excess caloric consumption, deficient exercise and disrupted sleep-wake cycles) and the metabolic abnormalities caused by obesity. We aim to manipulate these hormone levels to prevent the development and detrimental consequences of the MS.

    HEREDIATY PARAGAGLIOMA SYNDROME
    The Hereditary Paraganglioma Syndrome (hPGL) is a rare genetic cancer syndrome that is most commonly caused by a defect in mitochondrial metabolism. Our goal is to understand how altered cellular metabolism leads to the development of cancer. Although hPGL is uncommon, it serves as an excellent model for the abnormal metabolic behavior displayed by nearly all cancers. Our goal is to develop novel therapeutic strategies that target the abnormal behavior of cancer cells. In the laboratory we have developed hPGL mouse models and use high throughput chemical screening to identify the therapeutic susceptibilities that result from the abnormal metabolic behavior of cancer cells.

    As a physician scientist trained in clinical genetics I have developed expertise in hereditary endocrine disorders and devoted my efforts to treating families affected by the hPGL syndrome. By leveraging our laboratory expertise in the hPGL syndrome, our care for individuals who have inherited the hPGL syndrome is at the forefront of medicine. Our goal is to translate our laboratory discoveries to the treatment of affected families.

  • Eric Appel

    Eric Appel

    Assistant Professor of Material Science and Engineering, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The underlying theme of the Appel Lab at Stanford University integrates concepts and approaches from supramolecular chemistry, natural/synthetic materials, and biology. We aim to develop supramolecular biomaterials that exploit a diverse design toolbox and take advantage of the beautiful synergism between physical properties, aesthetics, and low energy consumption typical of natural systems. Our vision is to use these materials to solve fundamental biological questions and to engineer advanced healthcare solutions.

  • Amin Arbabian

    Amin Arbabian

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My group's research covers RF circuits and system design for (1) biomedical, (2) sensing, and (3) Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

  • Shipra Arya

    Shipra Arya

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Vascular Surgery)

    Bio Shipra Arya, MD SM FACS is an Associate Professor of Surgery at the Stanford University School of Medicine and section chief of vascular surgery at VA Palo Alto Healthcare System. She has a Master?s degree in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health with focus on research methodology and cardiovascular epidemiology. She completed her General Surgery Residency at Creighton University Medical Center followed by a Vascular Surgery Fellowship at University of Michigan. She has been funded by American Heart Association (AHA), NIH/NIA GEMSSTAR grant, VA Palo Alto Center for Innovation and Implementation (Ci2i) and is currently funded by VA HSR&D. The accumulated evidence from her research all points to the fact that frailty is a versatile tool that can be utilized to guide surgical decision making, inform patient consent and design quality improvement initiatives at the patient and hospital level. The field of frailty research in surgical population is still relatively nascent and her current work focuses on streamlining frailty evaluation, and implementation of patient and system level interventions to improve surgical outcomes and enhance patient centered care.

  • Euan A. Ashley

    Euan A. Ashley

    Associate Dean, School of Medicine, Roger W. and Joelle G. Burnell Professor of Genomics and Precision Health, Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), of Genetics, of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Ashley lab is focused on precision medicine. We develop methods for the interpretation of whole genome sequencing data to improve the diagnosis of genetic disease and to personalize the practice of medicine. At the wet bench, we take advantage of cell systems, transgenic models and microsurgical models of disease to prove causality in biological pathways and find targets for therapeutic development.

  • Themistocles (Tim) Assimes

    Themistocles (Tim) Assimes

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic Epidemiology, Genetic Determinants of Complex Traits related to Cardiovasular Medicine, Coronary Artery Disease related pathway analyses and integrative genomics, Mendelian randomization studies, risk prediction for major adverse cardiovascular events, cardiovascular medicine related pharmacogenomics, ethnic differences in the determinants of Insulin Mediated Glucose Uptake, pharmacoepidemiology of cardiovascular drugs & outcomes

  • David M. Axelrod, MD

    David M. Axelrod, MD

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Virtual Reality Congenital Heart Disease experience: The Stanford Virtual Heart. Currently engaged with 19 academic medical centers across the globe using our Stanford Virtual Heart to educate students and trainees, and research our VR experience as a means for training and education. Also developing next generation modeling and image interaction with Stanford engineers and educators, to promote personalized surgical training in VR and advanced educational programs in congenital heart disease.

  • Leah Backhus

    Leah Backhus

    Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Thoracic Surgery)

    Bio Leah Backhus trained in general surgery at the University of Southern California and cardiothoracic surgery at the University of California Los Angeles. She practices at Stanford Hospital and is Chief of Thoracic Surgery at the VA Palo Alto. Her surgical practice consists of general thoracic surgery with special emphasis on thoracic oncology and minimally invasive surgical techniques. She is also Co-Director of the Thoracic Surgery Clinical Research Program, and has grant funding through the Veterans Affairs Administration and NIH. Her current research interests are in imaging surveillance following treatment for lung cancer and cancer survivorship. She is a member of the National Lung Cancer Roundtable of the American Cancer Society serving as Chair of the Task Group on Lung Cancer in Women. She also serves on the Board of Directors of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. As an educator, Dr. Backhus is the Associate Program Director for the Thoracic Track Residency and is the Chair of the ACGME Residency Review Committee for Thoracic Surgery which is the accrediting body for all cardiothoracic surgery training programs in the US.

  • Julie Baker

    Julie Baker

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We examine how cells communicate and function during fetal development. The work in my laboratory focuses on the establishment of specific cell fates using genomics to decipher interactions between chromatin and developmental signaling cascades, between genomes and rapidly evolving cell types, and between genomic copy number variation and gene expression. In recent years we have focused on the vastly understudied biology of the trophoblast lineage, particularly how this lineage evolved.

  • Laurence Baker

    Laurence Baker

    Bing Professor of Human Biology and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Baker's research is in the area of health economics, and focuses on the effects of financial incentives, organizational structures, and government policies on the health care delivery system, health care costs, and health outcomes.

  • Hans-Christoph Becker, MD, FSABI, FSCCT

    Hans-Christoph Becker, MD, FSABI, FSCCT

    Clinical Professor, Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Myocardial bridges (MB) with associated upfront atherosclerotic lesions are common findings on coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). Abnormal septal wall motion in exercise echocardiography (EE) may to be associated with MB. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is considered the gold standard for the detection of MB. We investigate whether CTA is comparable to IVUS for the assessment of MB and upstream plaques in symptomatic patients with suspicion for MB raised by EE.

  • Gill Bejerano

    Gill Bejerano

    Professor of Developmental Biology, of Computer Science, of Pediatrics (Genetics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Bejerano, co-discoverer of ultraconserved elements, studies the Human Genome. His research focuses on genome sequence and function in both humans and related primate, mammalian and vertebrate species. He is deeply interested in mapping both coding and non-coding genome sequence variation to phenotype differences, and in extracting specific genetic insights from high throughput sequencing measurements, in the contexts of development and developmental abnormalities.

  • Daniel Bernstein

    Daniel Bernstein

    Alfred Woodley Salter and Mabel G. Salter Endowed Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to understand hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and heart failure associated with congenital heart disease.
    2. Role of alterations in mitochondrial dycamics and function in normal physiology and disease.
    3. Differences between R and L ventricular responses to stress,
    4. Immune biomarkers of risk after pediatric VAD implantation.
    5. Biomarkers for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  • Gerald Berry

    Gerald Berry

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiopulmonary and pulmonary transplant medicine; diagnostic surgical pathology

  • Vivek Bhalla, MD

    Vivek Bhalla, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Nephrology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Bhalla's two primary research interests are in the role of the kidney in diabetes and hypertension. We use molecular, biochemical, and transgenic approaches to study: (1) mechanisms diabetic kidney disease disease including the role of the endothelium to regulate inflammation and kidney injury; and (2) regulation of tubular transport of glucose, sodium, and potassium. These latter studies have treatment implications in diabetes, kidney disease, and hypertension.

  • Ami Bhatt

    Ami Bhatt

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Hematology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Bhatt lab is exploring how the microbiota is intertwined with states of health and disease. We apply the most modern genetic tools in an effort to deconvolute the mechanism of human diseases.

  • Y. Katherine Bianco

    Y. Katherine Bianco

    Clinical Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Maternal Fetal Medicine

    Bio My clinical interest in pregnancies complicated with birth defects has led my underlying research interests in genomic abnormalities in the human trophoblast carrying to faulty placentation. The latter began with initial work during K12 and KO8 funding. I took a great interest in the human placenta as it carries potential advantages over other tissues sources: first, this highly metabolically active organ is the potential source of many transcripts. Second, the placenta forms at a very early stage of embryonic development, potentially allowing detection of primary alterations as compared to secondary changes that may mask the underlying causal phenomena. Finally, studying early placentation may provide targets for development of novel molecular approaches, such as up-regulate or down-regulate genes, the protein products of which could potentially serve as molecular surrogates for diagnosis and treatment of pregnancy complication such as miscarriages, pre-eclampsia, pregnancy induced hypertension and intrauterine growth retardation. This work has led to the first Trisomy 21, Trisomy 18, trisomy 13 cell lines established from human placentas making it possible to apply gene editing in the early stages of human trophoblast development.

    As my primary clinical responsibility involves treating patients needing medical care and support through their high risk pregnancies, I am interested in factors that may impact outcomes, such as prenatal screening and diagnosis, maternal heart conditions, labor and delivery management, and safety approaches for the second stage of labor. In investigating length of labor and approaches to shorten the second stage, I have found methods of improving perinatal outcomes in diverse maternal populations.

    With regards to my interest in fetal medicine, I have worked in collaboration with other specialists such as radiologists and pediatric cardiologists utilizing imagining studies to assess and determine successful perinatal care and fetal survival.

  • Sandip Biswal, MD

    Sandip Biswal, MD

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Musculoskeletal Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The management of individuals suffering from chronic pain is unfortunately limited by poor diagnostic tests and therapies. Our research group is interested in 'imaging pain' by using novel imaging techniques to study peripheral nociception and inflammation with the goal of accurately identifying the location of pain generators. We are developing new approaches with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (PET/MRI) and are currently in clinical trials.

  • Richard Bland

    Richard Bland

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Neonatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on the pathogenesis and treatment of acute and chronic neonatal lung injury and the mechanisms that regulate lung fluid balance and alveolar & pulmonary vascular development after premature birth.

  • Francis Blankenberg

    Francis Blankenberg

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Studies on apoptotic cell death in vivo using the H MRS phenomenon.

  • Terrence Blaschke

    Terrence Blaschke

    Professor of Medicine and of Molecular Pharmacology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical pharmacology of antiretroviral drugs

    Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms of variability in drug response.

    Drug development

  • Helen M. Blau

    Helen M. Blau

    Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation Professor, Director, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology and Professor, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Prof. Helen Blau's research area is regenerative medicine with a focus on stem cells. Her research on nuclear reprogramming and demonstrating the plasticity of cell fate using cell fusion is well known and her laboratory has also pioneered the design of biomaterials to mimic the in vivo microenvironment and direct stem cell fate. Current findings are leading to more efficient iPS generation, cell based therapies by dedifferentiation a la newts, and discovery of novel molecules and therapies.

  • Paul Bollyky

    Paul Bollyky

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Bollyky Lab studies the immunology of chronic bacterial infections with an emphasis on Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound and lung infections in Diabetes and Cystic Fibrosis. Areas of particular interest include bacteriophages, biofilms, and host-pathogen interactions. Our goals are to gain insight into fundamental disease mechanisms and to generate novel therapies to improve human health.

  • Francesca Briganti

    Francesca Briganti

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Cardiovascular Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One gene can lead to the production of many different RNA isoforms via mechanisms such as alternative promoter usage, splicing, and polyadenylation. The functional significance of many of these isoforms, their impact on cell physiology, and their regulation remain mostly controversial. Understanding the functional consequences of transcript heterogeneity will improve our understanding of gene expression regulation, broadening our ability to intervene when mutations that interfere with this regulation cause human disease.
    My goal is to become an independent researcher leading an academic lab that focuses on better understanding human tissue-specific post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression and developing mechanism-based therapeutics. My general strategy is to study the function of regulatory genes and their deregulation in human disease. My specific approach is to understand the molecular mechanisms by which disease-causing mutations alter the gene function and lead to human disease. My hypothesis is that a detailed understanding of the relationship between the gene's molecular function and the disease mechanism will allow the development of first-in-class, personalized therapeutic strategies that target the disease mechanisms rather than manage symptoms independently of disease etiology.

  • Jessica Brodt

    Jessica Brodt

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical Education
    Regional Anesthesia for Cardiothoracic Enhanced Recovery (RACER)
    Anesthesia for transcatheter and electrophyiology procedures

  • Anne Brunet

    Anne Brunet

    Michele and Timothy Barakett Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab studies the molecular basis of longevity. We are interested in the mechanism of action of known longevity genes, including FOXO and SIRT, in the mammalian nervous system. We are particularly interested in the role of these longevity genes in neural stem cells. We are also discovering novel genes and processes involved in aging using two short-lived model systems, the invertebrate C. elegans and an extremely short-lived vertebrate, the African killifish N. furzeri.

  • Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goal of the Buckwalter Lab is to improve how people recover after a stroke. We use basic research to understand the cells, proteins, and genes that lead to successful recovery of function, and also how complications develop that impact quality of life after stroke. Ongoing projects are focused on understanding how inflammatory responses are regulated after a stroke and how to make recovery faster and better after stroke.

  • Thomas Burdon

    Thomas Burdon

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Adult Cardiac Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests New technologies in the area of catheters, clamps, and, visualization devices for aid in cardiac surgery; distribution of, cardioplegia, both anterograde and retrograde as determined by, techniques in technetium pyro-phosphate scans; glucose insulin, potassium as an adjunct in cardiac surgery.

Stanford Medicine Resources: