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Bio

Bio


Theresa is an Adult Nurse Practitioner with over 20 years? experience at Stanford Health Care in Palo Alto, California. She received her graduate degree from University of California, San Francisco.

Theresa?s current clinical practice within the Division of Pain Medicine, focuses primarily on evaluation and treatment of individuals suffering from acute and chronic pain conditions in both the hospital and outpatient settings.

As part of her commitment to education and professional development, she lectures extensively on topics surrounding pain management both locally and regionally. She has authored and co-authored numerous articles, abstracts, and book chapters on topics pertaining to pain assessment and management. Theresa is a clinical preceptor for NP and PA students in the greater Bay Area; she also mentors and instructs the fellows and residents on the Stanford Pain Service.

Theresa is actively involved in multiple professional organizations including: The American Association of Nurse Practitioners, California Association of Nurse Practitioners, American Society of Pain Management Nursing and American Academy of Pain Medicine. As part of her commitment to safety and ethical treatment of patients with pain; Theresa has provided services as an independent expert witness on issues related to pain management and treatment.

Honors & Awards


  • Advanced Practice Provider of the Year, Stanford Health Care (2015)
  • Nurse Practitioner of the Year (Pain Management), Point of Care Network (2019)

Education & Certifications


  • Board Certification: American Nurses Credentialing Center, Nurse Practitioner (2014)
  • Professional Education: UCSF School Of Nursing (2002) CA

Publications

All Publications


  • Pain and Function in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain-Treating the Whole Person. Journal of multidisciplinary healthcare Mallick-Searle, T., Sharma, K., Toal, P., Gutman, A. 2021; 14: 335?47

    Abstract

    Chronic pain is often associated with functional limitations that have a huge impact on patients' lives. However, despite being relatively common, chronic musculoskeletal pain is still viewed by some as a symptom of another disease rather than its own condition, and is therefore poorly addressed. This is compounded by other challenges in the field, including education gaps for both healthcare professionals and patients, a lack of universal and comprehensive assessment tools, poor societal perceptions of chronic pain, and the current stigma around the use of opioids. Here, we review the current chronic musculoskeletal pain management landscape in the United States and offer professional insight into emerging methods that can be used to improve patient outcomes, in particular, the achievement of meaningful functional goals. This perspective incorporates our combined multidisciplinary (psychiatry, psychology, nursing, physical therapy, and general medicine) experience and insights. We believe that chronic pain is a multifactorial experience and treatment requires an integrated, multidisciplinary approach from a range of healthcare providers. For the best patient outcomes, this team should work together to assess and treat the patient as a whole, addressing their pain and also providing education, empowerment, and support to enable patients to set and achieve meaningful functional goals that will provide real improvement in their quality of life. We believe that the healthcare community should elevate the conversation around chronic musculoskeletal pain management beyond that of just pain, to encompass the meaningful benefits that improvement in functional outcomes brings to patients.

    View details for DOI 10.2147/JMDH.S288401

    View details for PubMedID 33603392

  • Pharmacotherapy for Pain Management Advanced Pharmacology for Prescribers, 1st ed. Mallick-Searle, T., Vongspanich , J., Ali , A. Springer Publishing. 2021; 1st: 533?548
  • Unmet needs in the acute treatment of migraine attacks and the emerging role of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists: An integrative review. Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners Mallick-Searle, T., Moriarty, M. 2020

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Migraine is a prevalent and chronic disease associated with high rates of disability and significant financial and socioeconomic burden. Current acute treatments for migraine attacks include both migraine-specific (e.g., triptans, ergotamines) and nonspecific (e.g., nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) medications; however, significant unmet treatment needs remain.OBJECTIVES: The authors sought to characterize the nature and drivers of unmet treatment needs in the acute treatment of migraine attacks and describe emerging migraine-specific treatments, that is, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists.DATA SOURCES: PubMed searches were conducted using search terms for studies of unmet migraine treatment needs and CGRP receptor antagonists. Additionally, studies presented at recent headache-focused congresses were included.CONCLUSIONS: Forty percent of people with migraine report at least 1 unmet treatment need. Many people are unable to use migraine-specific or nonspecific agents because of contraindications, precautions, and tolerability issues. Disease burden (disability, headache severity/frequency) remains high even in those receiving migraine-specific medications. The oral CGRP receptor antagonists, ubrogepant and rimegepant, demonstrated efficacy in reducing migraine pain, migraine-associated symptoms, and disability, with a low adverse event profile, similar to placebo.IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The availability and use of CGRP receptor antagonists may help reduce the extent of unmet needs in the treatment of migraine attacks, resulting in more patients receiving treatment and better outcomes for people with migraine. Nurse practitioners are well positioned to increase rates of migraine diagnosis/treatment (another key unmet need), using consensus guidelines to guide their approach.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/JXX.0000000000000397

    View details for PubMedID 32304480

  • Understanding Buprenorphine for Use in Chronic Pain: Expert Opinion. Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.) Webster, L., Gudin, J., Raffa, R. B., Kuchera, J., Rauck, R., Fudin, J., Adler, J., Mallick-Searle, T. 2020

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: An expert panel convened to reach a consensus on common misconceptions surrounding buprenorphine, a Schedule III partial -opioid receptor agonist indicated for chronic pain. The panel also provided clinical recommendations on the appropriate use of buprenorphine and conversion strategies for switching to buprenorphine from a full -opioid receptor agonist for chronic pain management.METHODS: The consensus panel met on March 25, 2019, to discuss relevant literature and provide recommendations on interpreting buprenorphine as a partial -opioid receptor agonist, prescribing buprenorphine before some Schedule II, III, or IV options, perioperative/trauma management of patients taking buprenorphine, and converting patients from a full -opioid receptor agonist to buprenorphine.RESULTS: The panel recommended that buprenorphine's classification as a partial -opioid receptor agonist not be clinically translated to mean partial analgesic efficacy. The panel also recommended that buprenorphine be considered before some Schedule II, III, or IV opioids in patients with a favorable risk/benefit profile on the basis of metabolic factors, abuse potential, and tolerability and that buprenorphine be continued during the perioperative/trauma period. In addition, switching patients from a full -opioid receptor agonist to buprenorphine should be considered with no weaning period at starting doses that are based on the previous opioid dose.CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations provide a framework for clinicians to address most clinical scenarios regarding buprenorphine use. The overall consensus of the panel was that buprenorphine is a unique Schedule III opioid with favorable pharmacologic properties and a safety profile that may be desirable for chronic pain management.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/pm/pnz356

    View details for PubMedID 31917418

  • Headaches Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Practice Nurse Prescribers, 5th ed. Mallick-Searle, T. F.A. Davis Company. 2020; 5th: 1069?1099
  • Monoclonal Antibodies to CGRP or Its Receptor for Migraine Prevention JNP-JOURNAL FOR NURSE PRACTITIONERS Moriarty, M., Mallick-Searle, T., Barch, C. A., Oas, K. 2019; 15 (10): 717-+
  • Cannabinoids in Pain Treatment: An Overview PAIN MANAGEMENT NURSING Mallick-Searle, T., St Marie, B. 2019; 20 (2): 107?12

    Abstract

    The current landscape contains conflicting reports regarding the use of medical marijuana, creating fields of misinformation and lack of understanding by health care providers about cannabinoids. In this article we provide a dispassionate look at medical marijuana, while providing a clinical overview focusing on pain management. We examine the mechanisms of the endocannabinoid system, along with the pharmacology of cannabinoids. Current research on the use of marijuana for the treatment of pain is reviewed. Finally, recommendations for pain management nurses on integrating research, clinical practice, and U.S. drug policy are made.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pmn.2018.12.006

    View details for Web of Science ID 000466100700058

    View details for PubMedID 31036325

  • International Stakeholder Community of Pain Experts and Leaders Call for an Urgent Action on Forced Opioid Tapering PAIN MEDICINE Darnall, B. D., Juurlink, D., Kerns, R. D., Mackey, S., Van Dorsten, B., Humphreys, K., Gonzalez-Sotomayor, J. A., Furlan, A., Gordon, A. J., Gordon, D. B., Hoffman, D. E., Katz, J., Kertesz, S. G., Satel, S., Lawhern, R. A., Nicholson, K. M., Polomano, R. C., Williamson, O. D., McAnally, H., Kao, M., Schug, S., Twillman, R., Lewis, T. A., Stieg, R. L., Lorig, K., Mallick-Searle, T., West, R. W., Gray, S., Ariens, S. R., Potter, J., Cowan, P., Kollas, C. D., Laird, D., Ingle, B., Grove, J., Wilson, M., Lockman, K., Hodson, F., Palackdharry, C. S., Fillingim, R. B., Fudin, J., Barnhouse, J., Manhapra, A., Henson, S. R., Singer, B., Ljosenvoor, M., Griffith, M., Doctor, J. N., Hardin, K., London, C., Mankowski, J., Anderson, A., Ellsworth, L., Budzinski, L., Brandt, B., Hartley, G., Heck, D., Zobrosky, M. J., Cheek, C., Wilson, M., Laux, C. E., Datz, G., Dunaway, J., Schonfeld, E., Cady, M., LeDantec-Boswell, T., Craigie, M., Sturgeon, J., Flood, P., Giummarra, M., Whelan, J., Thorn, B. E., Martin, R. L., Schatman, M. E., Gregory, M. D., Kirz, J., Robinson, P., Marx, J. G., Stewart, J. R., Keck, P. S., Hadland, S. E., Murphy, J. L., Lumley, M. A., Brown, K. S., Leong, M. S., Fillman, M., Broatch, J. W., Perez, A., Watford, K., Kruska, K., You, D., Ogbeide, S., Kukucka, A., Lawson, S., Ray, J. B., Martin, T., Lakehomer, J. B., Burke, A., Cohen, R. I., Grinspoon, P., Rubenstein, M. S., Sutherland, S., Walters, K., Lovejoy, T. 2019; 20 (3): 429?33

    View details for DOI 10.1093/pm/pny228

    View details for Web of Science ID 000467966600003

  • International Stakeholder Community of Pain Experts and Leaders Call for an Urgent Action on Forced Opioid Tapering. Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.) Darnall, B. D., Juurlink, D., Kerns, R. D., Mackey, S., Van Dorsten, B., Humphreys, K., Gonzalez-Sotomayor, J. A., Furlan, A., Gordon, A. J., Gordon, D. B., Hoffman, D. E., Katz, J., Kertesz, S. G., Satel, S., Lawhern, R. A., Nicholson, K. M., Polomano, R. C., Williamson, O. D., McAnally, H., Kao, M., Schug, S., Twillman, R., Lewis, T. A., Stieg, R. L., Lorig, K., Mallick-Searle, T., West, R. W., Gray, S., Ariens, S. R., Sharpe Potter, J., Cowan, P., Kollas, C. D., Laird, D., Ingle, B., Julian Grove, J., Wilson, M., Lockman, K., Hodson, F., Palackdharry, C. S., Fillingim, R. B., Fudin, J., Barnhouse, J., Manhapra, A., Henson, S. R., Singer, B., Ljosenvoor, M., Griffith, M., Doctor, J. N., Hardin, K., London, C., Mankowski, J., Anderson, A., Ellsworth, L., Davis Budzinski, L., Brandt, B., Harkootley, G., Nickels Heck, D., Zobrosky, M. J., Cheek, C., Wilson, M., Laux, C. E., Datz, G., Dunaway, J., Schonfeld, E., Cady, M., LeDantec-Boswell, T., Craigie, M., Sturgeon, J., Flood, P., Giummarra, M., Whelan, J., Thorn, B. E., Martin, R. L., Schatman, M. E., Gregory, M. D., Kirz, J., Robinson, P., Marx, J. G., Stewart, J. R., Keck, P. S., Hadland, S. E., Murphy, J. L., Lumley, M. A., Brown, K. S., Leong, M. S., Fillman, M., Broatch, J. W., Perez, A., Watford, K., Kruska, K., Sophia You, D., Ogbeide, S., Kukucka, A., Lawson, S., Ray, J. B., Wade Martin, T., Lakehomer, J. B., Burke, A., Cohen, R. I., Grinspoon, P., Rubenstein, M. S., Sutherland, S., Walters, K. R., Lovejoy, T. 2018

    View details for PubMedID 30496540

  • The importance of nurse monitoring for potential opioid abuse in their patients JOURNAL OF APPLIED BIOBEHAVIORAL RESEARCH Mallick-Searle, T., Chang, H. 2018; 23 (1)

    View details for DOI 10.1111/jabr.12129

    View details for Web of Science ID 000428647100007

  • An overview of abuse-deterrent opioids and recommendations for practical patient care JOURNAL OF MULTIDISCIPLINARY HEALTHCARE Adler, J. A., Mallick-Searle, T. 2018; 11: 323?32

    Abstract

    Despite advances in the treatment of severe intractable pain, opioids remain a critical and appropriate component of treatment. However, abuse, misuse, and diversion of prescription opioids are significant public health concerns. Opioid abuse-deterrent formulations (ADFs) are one component of an opioid risk management plan to manage patient's pain relief and quality of life while offering some protection against potentially harmful consequences of opioids from misuse and abuse. Opioid ADFs are designed to make manipulation more difficult and administration via non-oral routes less appealing. There are currently nine extended-release and one immediate-release opioid pain medications with US Food and Drug Administration-approved ADF labeling. All use physical/chemical barriers or agonist/antagonist combinations to deter manipulation and abuse. Evidence suggests that opioid ADFs decrease rates of abuse and diversion of opioids in the USA; however, some opioid ADFs are not yet commercially available or have not been on the market long enough to undergo post-marketing data analyses. Opioid ADFs along with the use of prescription drug monitoring programs, clinical assessment tools, toxicology testing, and co-prescribing of naloxone are all tools that can be used to reduce opioid abuse. Patient education on the risks of abuse and diversion is vital and includes a discussion of appropriate use of medication and proper storage. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners are on the "front lines" in battling opioid abuse and serve a key role in recognizing and mitigating the risks of prescription opioid diversion, abuse, and misuse (intentional and unintentional) and in identifying patients at risk for abuse while still providing pain relief to patients.

    View details for DOI 10.2147/JMDH.S166915

    View details for Web of Science ID 000438594400001

    View details for PubMedID 30026658

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC6045950

  • Physiology of Pain Core Curriculum for Pain Management Nursing Montgomery, R., Mallick-Searle, T., Peltier, C., Polomano, R. Elsevier. 2018; 3rd: 132?169
  • Commonly used nonopioid analgesics in adults. Nursing Mallick-Searle, T. 2018; 48 (5): 61?63
  • The pathophysiology, incidence, impact, and treatment of opioid-induced nausea and vomiting JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF NURSE PRACTITIONERS Mallick-Searle, T., Fillman, M. 2017; 29 (11): 704?10

    Abstract

    Opioid medications are integral in managing acute moderate-to-severe pain. Opioid analgesics bind to ? (mu), ? (kappa), or ? (delta) opioid receptors in the brain, spinal cord, and digestive tract. However, opioids cause adverse effects that may interfere with their therapeutic use. Some adverse effects wane over time, but patients using opioids for acute pain struggle with opioid-induced nausea and vomiting (OINV) the entire time they take the opioid. This article discusses the underlying mechanisms, clinical implications, and treatment strategies of OINV.Systematic search and review of Medline, PubMed, and Google Scholar for articles relating to OINV. In addition, package inserts provided pharmacologic data and dose recommendations as needed.Research suggests approximately 40% of patients may experience nausea and 15%-25% of patients may experience vomiting after opioid administration. Nausea often precedes vomiting, although they can occur separately. Many patients receiving opioids rate the nausea and vomiting as worse than their pain. Nausea and vomiting can lead to complications including electrolyte imbalances, malnutrition, and volume depletion, and can also negatively affect quality of life and postoperative recovery.There are several medications that can be used to treat OINV including serotonin receptor antagonists, dopamine receptor antagonists, and neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists. Healthcare providers should be proactive about discussing OINV with patients, as this may improve patient outcomes and pain relief.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/2327-6924.12532

    View details for Web of Science ID 000415011200009

    View details for PubMedID 29131554

  • Diagnosis and treatment for chronic migraine NURSE PRACTITIONER Moriarty, M., Mallick-Searle, T. 2016; 41 (6): 18-+

    Abstract

    Migraine is a debilitating headache disorder that is underdiagnosed and undertreated worldwide, partially attributable to misdiagnosis and expectations of poor treatment outcomes. This article provides a review of chronic migraine, including pathophysiology, burden, diagnosis, and management, with special emphasis on the role of NPs.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/01.NPR.0000483078.55590.b3

    View details for Web of Science ID 000379375000003

    View details for PubMedID 27203455

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4876579

  • Over-the-Counter Analgesics: What Nurse Practitioners Need to Know JNP-JOURNAL FOR NURSE PRACTITIONERS Mallick-Searle, T. 2016; 12 (3): 174?80
  • Postherpetic neuralgia: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and pain management pharmacology JOURNAL OF MULTIDISCIPLINARY HEALTHCARE Mallick-Searle, T., Snodgrass, B., Brant, J. M. 2016; 9: 447?54

    Abstract

    Herpes zoster, also known as shingles, is a distinctive clinical condition caused by the reactivation of latent varicella zoster (chickenpox) virus following an initial infection. Approximately 1 million cases of herpes zoster occur annually in the US, and one in every three people develops herpes zoster during their lifetime. Postherpetic neuralgia is a neuropathic pain syndrome characterized by pain that persists for months to years after resolution of the herpes zoster rash. It stems from damage to peripheral and central neurons that may be a byproduct of the immune/inflammatory response accompanying varicella zoster virus reactivation. Patients with postherpetic neuralgia report decreased quality of life and interference with activities of daily living. Approaches to management of postherpetic neuralgia include preventing herpes zoster through vaccination and/or antiviral treatment, and administering specific medications to treat pain. Current guidelines recommend treatment of postherpetic neuralgia in a hierarchical manner, with calcium channel ?2-? ligands (gabapentin and pregabalin), tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline, nortriptyline, or desipramine), or topical lidocaine patches as first-line drugs. The safety and tolerability of pharmacologic therapies for pain are important issues to consider as postherpetic neuralgia affects primarily an older population. Patients should be educated on appropriate dosing, titration if applicable, the importance of adherence to treatment for optimal effectiveness, and possible side effects. Health-care professionals play a key role in helping to ameliorate the pain caused by postherpetic neuralgia through early recognition and diligent assessment of the problem; recommending evidence-based treatments; and monitoring treatment adherence, adverse events, responses, and expectations. Nurse practitioners are especially crucial in establishing communication with patients and encouraging the initiation of appropriate pain-relieving treatments.

    View details for DOI 10.2147/JMDH.S106340

    View details for Web of Science ID 000384261600001

    View details for PubMedID 27703368

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5036669

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