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School of Medicine


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  • Raag Airan

    Raag Airan

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our goal is to develop and clinically implement new technologies for high-precision and noninvasive intervention upon the nervous system. Every few millimeters of the brain is functionally distinct, and different parts of the brain may have counteracting responses to therapy. To better match our therapies to neuroscience, we develop techniques that allow intervention upon only the right part of the nervous system at the right time, using technologies like focused ultrasound and nanotechnology.

  • Patrick Barnes

    Patrick Barnes

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Advanced imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, of injury to the developing central nervous system; including fetal, neonatal, infant and young child; and, including nonaccidental injury (e.g. child abuse).

  • Richard Barth

    Richard Barth

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Sonographic diagnosis of fetal anomalies.
    Focus interest in the diagnosis and conservative (non-surgical and minimal radiation) management of congenital broncho pulmonary malformations.
    Imaging of appendicitis in children.
    Sonography of the pediatric testis.

  • Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Radiology (Musculoskeletal Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Informatics and image processing techniques that provide infrastructure for diagnosis in musculoskeletal imaging. Decision support for improving accuracy of bone tumor diagnosis. Improved methods for MRI in the musculoskeletal system.

  • Hans-Christoph Becker, MD, FSABI, FSCCT

    Hans-Christoph Becker, MD, FSABI, FSCCT

    Clinical Professor, Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Myocardial bridges (MB) with associated upfront atherosclerotic lesions are common findings on coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). Abnormal septal wall motion in exercise echocardiography (EE) may to be associated with MB. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is considered the gold standard for the detection of MB. We investigate whether CTA is comparable to IVUS for the assessment of MB and upstream plaques in symptomatic patients with suspicion for MB raised by EE.

  • Corinne Beinat

    Corinne Beinat

    Instructor, Radiology - Rad/Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My current research areas of interest include developing new strategies for: 1) novel radioligand and radiotracer development for various targets involved in brain cancer, 2) preclinical animal models of glioblastoma, and 3) clinical translation of useful radiopharmaceuticals for early-detection of disease and monitoring therapy.

  • Carolyn Bertozzi

    Carolyn Bertozzi

    Baker Family Director of Stanford ChEM-H, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Radiology

    Bio Professor Carolyn Bertozzi's research interests span the disciplines of chemistry and biology with an emphasis on studies of cell surface sugars important to human health and disease. Her research group profiles changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and uses this information to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology.

    Dr. Bertozzi completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Harvard University and her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, focusing on the chemical synthesis of oligosaccharide analogs. During postdoctoral work at UC San Francisco, she studied the activity of endothelial oligosaccharides in promoting cell adhesion at sites of inflammation. She joined the UC Berkeley faculty in 1996. A Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 2000, she came to Stanford University in June 2015, among the first faculty to join the interdisciplinary institute ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). She is now the Baker Family Director of Stanford ChEM-H.

    Named a MacArthur Fellow in 1999, Dr. Bertozzi has received many awards for her dedication to chemistry, and to training a new generation of scientists fluent in both chemistry and biology. She has been elected to the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and received the Lemelson-MIT Prize, the Heinrich Wieland Prize, the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, and the Chemistry of the Future Solvay Prize, among others.

    The Bertozzi Group develops chemical tools to study the glycobiology underlying diseases such as cancer, inflammation, tuberculosis and most recently COVID-19. She is the inventor of "bioorthogonal chemistry", a class of chemical reactions compatible with living systems that enable molecular imaging and drug targeting. Her group also developed new therapeutic modalities for targeted degradation of extracellular biomolecules, such as antibody-enzyme conjugates and Lysosome Targeting Chimeras (LYTACs). As well, her group studies NGly1 deficiency, a rare genetic disease characterized by loss of the human N-glycanase.

    Several of the technologies developed in the Bertozzi lab have been adapted for commercial use. Actively engaged with several biotechnology start-ups, Dr. Bertozzi cofounded Redwood Bioscience, Enable Biosciences, Palleon Pharmaceuticals, InterVenn Bio, OliLux Bio, Grace Science LLC and Lycia Therapeutics. She is also a member of the Board of Directors of Lilly.

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