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School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 27 Results

  • Anusha Chandrakanthan

    Anusha Chandrakanthan

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Anusha Chandrakanthan is a clinical instructor in psychiatry. She is a family practice physician who is board certified in Addiction Medicine. Previously, she was the medical director for a company that provided substance use treatment using telemedicine. Presently, she works with the Valley Homeless Healthcare Program at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center providing services to a marginalized population. She also continues to teach at the Stanford Addiction Medicine fellowship.

  • Sripriya Chari

    Sripriya Chari

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Sripriya (Priya) Chari is a CA Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Clinical Assistant Professor working with the INSPIRE Clinic at Stanford. Dr. Chari's clinical interests lie in early identification of the psychosis risk syndrome and providing evidence based psychotherapeutic interventions from a recovery oriented perspective. Prior to the INSPIRE Clinic, Dr. Chari was a clinical assessor for the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study, aimed at studying the predictors for conversion to psychosis of youth at clinical high risk for psychosis. She also worked for Santa Clara County Department of Mental Health, in inpatient, outpatient, and forensic settings providing psychotherapy and assessment services.

  • Lu Chen

    Lu Chen

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests What distinguishes us humans from other animals is our ability to undergo complex behavior. The synapses are the structural connection between neurons that mediates the communication between neurons, which underlies our various cognitive function. My research program aims to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie synapse function during behavior in the developing and mature brain, and how synapse function is altered during mental retardation.

  • Octavio Choi, MD, PhD

    Octavio Choi, MD, PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Choi is a forensic psychiatrist and clinical associate professor of psychiatry. He holds an MD in psychiatry and a PhD in neuroscience. He is the founding director of Stanford's Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship Program, the first neurolaw-focused forensic fellowship in the world, and Director of Training in Stanford's Program in Psychiatry and the Law. Dr. Choi is an active educator, providing seminars to students, attorneys, judges, neuroscientists and clinicians on the importance and relevance of neuroscience and the law.

    As a forensic psychiatrist, Dr. Choi specializes in neurolaw, an emerging interdisciplinary field that studies the use and misuse of neuroscience-based evidence in the courtroom. His research interests include the use of functional brain imaging to discern mental states (e.g. lie detection, pain assessment), and the neural basis for moral decision making (e.g. defects in moral reasoning brain centers giving rise to psychopathy). A central question he considers is: how do advances in our knowledge of the neural basis of behavior change perceptions of how offenders should be punished? He has testified as a court-appointed expert, as well as for the prosecution and defense, in many high-profile and complex cases involving psychiatric, neurologic, medical, and medication-related legal claims.

    Dr. Choi?s clinical interests include neuromodulatory approaches to treat psychiatric illness, such as the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to treat major depression. He is part of the interventional psychiatry group of Stanford Medicine, conducting clinical work and research to advance the power, precision, and scope of neuromodulation.

    Dr. Choi is an experienced public speaker, and has given a number of talks to lay and professional audiences on neurolaw, the neuroscience of psychopathy, and the neuroscience of moral decision-making. He is a featured TEDx speaker on the topic "Can Neuroscience Eradicate Psychopathy?"

  • Mehak Chopra

    Mehak Chopra

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Her expertise lies in treating special populations such as athletes and students. She has also had training in dealing with cultural psychiatry issues. She has been trained to treat students with a variety of mental health issues ? ADHD, Bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, eating disorders, insomnia, mood disorder and personality disorders.

  • Stephanie Clarke

    Stephanie Clarke

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Bio Dr. Stephanie Clarke is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Clarke is an expert in the treatment of suicidal and self-harming behavior in adolescents, with additional expertise in evidence-based treatment of trauma and restrictive eating disorders in adolescents. She is intensively trained in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), currently the only well-established treatment for self-harming adolescents at high risk for suicide. Dr. Clarke is an Attending Psychologist and supervisor in Stanford?s Adolescent DBT Program. She is also the Stanford Psychologist in the DBT Intensive Outpatient Program, RISE, a collaboration between Stanford and Children?s Health Council, where she is in charge of training and supervision of psychology trainees. Dr. Clarke also provides education and training to psychology and psychiatry trainees in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Dr. Clarke has given numerous talks, trainings, and lectures and has co-authored several publications on the topics of adolescent suicide, self-harming behavior, and DBT.

    Dr. Clarke is currently funded by a grant from the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Maternal and Child Health Research Institute to study the safety and feasibility of providing exposure-based trauma treatment to suicidal teens in stage I DBT.

    In 2020, Dr. Clarke was the recipient of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science's Clinical Innovation and Service Award. Dr. Clarke was also awarded funding from the Professional Leadership Development Awards Program for the 20-21 academic year, which supports the career development of department faculty who exhibit particular promise in advancing into leadership roles in academic medicine.

    Dr. Clarke sees patients who participate in the RISE program and the Stanford Adolescent DBT Program. She also maintains a small private practice, where she provides provider consultation, parent coaching, and individual therapy for adolescents and adults using ACT and DBT approaches.

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