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School of Medicine


Showing 1-44 of 44 Results

  • Karim Sallam, MD

    Karim Sallam, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Bio Karim Sallam, MD, is trained in Cardiovascular Medicine and Advanced Heart Failure.

  • Darren Salmi

    Darren Salmi

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - Anatomy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Medical education, anatomy, autopsy, cardiovascular pathology

  • Jacinda Sampson

    Jacinda Sampson

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Jacinda Sampson received her MD and a PhD in biochemistry from University of Alabama at Birmingham, and completed her neurology residency and neurogenetics fellowship at the University of Utah. She served at Columbia University Medical Center prior to joining Stanford University Medical Center in 2015. Her areas of interest include myotonic dystrophies, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and neurogenetic disorders such as neurofibromatosis, hereditary spastic paraparesis, spinocerebellar ataxia, among others. She is interested in clinical trials for treatment of neurogenetic disorders, and is the clinical application of next-generation genomic sequencing to genetic testing.

  • Nazish Sayed MD, PhD

    Nazish Sayed MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Surgery (Vascular Surgery) and at the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Sayed Laboratory is focused on the development of novel technologies that drive innovation in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug testing in vascular biology. The lab conducts translational research in vascular biology and aims to understand the role of the vasculature in the development of cardiac diseases, including those due to inherited genetic variants or environmental insults such as type 2 diabetes or hypertension. The lab employs the human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to generate patient-specific vascular cells (endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells) as an alternative to animal models providing a human tissue surrogate for research that is scalable and sustainable. By employing this unique platform, the lab also investigates the role of chemotherapeutic agents (anti-cancer drugs) on the vasculature. Dr. Sayed?s lab has also established an endothelial regeneration program, where they leverage the innate immune system to regenerate endothelial cells from human fibroblasts.

    Work from the lab has led to seminal discoveries in the areas of 1) Nitric oxide (NO) biology, (2) vascular biology, (3) stem cell biology, (4) cardiovascular disease modeling (5) cardio-oncology.

  • Erika Schillinger

    Erika Schillinger

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My passion is clinical skills education: the patient's experience of health and healthcare, doctor-patient communication, professionalism and physical exam. I am focused on curriculum design and innovation, having helped develop the Continuity of Care Clerkship, the clinical skills curriculum in Practice of Medicine, the Family Medicine core clerkship, outpatient faculty development modules and the SHIELD course (Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive).

  • Ingela Schnittger, MD

    Ingela Schnittger, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My main research continues to be in the field of echocardiography. Several areas of research are currently being pursued.

  • Donald Schreiber

    Donald Schreiber

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research group focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular emergencies including acute myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome and congestive heart failure. We have evaluated novel cardiac markers and point-of-care testing in clinical practice. Current projects also include the diagnosis and treatment of acute pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis. Other interests include spinal cord injury, pneumonia and sepsis.

  • John S. Schroeder, MD

    John S. Schroeder, MD

    Professor (Clinical) of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Clinical Pharmocology of Cardiovascular Drugs
    (a) Calcium Channel Blockers
    (b) Agents for Heart Failure
    (c) Anti-atherosclerotic Effects of Cardiovascular Drugs, e.g. Calcium Channel Blockers

    2. Cardiac Transplantation/Congestive Heart Failure

    3. Coronary Artery Spasm

  • Matthew P. Scott

    Matthew P. Scott

    Professor of Developmental Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research has been focused on the genetic regulation of animal development and its relation to birth defects, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We studied mechanisms and functions of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, which controls cell fates and growth, in the context of normal development and brain cancer. We studied a neurodegenerative disease, Niemann-Pick C syndrome, that affects intracellular organelle movements and sterol homeostasis. Due to Dr. Scott's new job, the lab is no longer active.

  • Katharine Edwards

    Katharine Edwards

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Potential impact of brief behavioral interventions to improve adjustment, coping, medical adherence, and cardiovascular health among cardiac patients.

    Psychosocial challenges of patients with spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD).

    Assessment and training in evidence-based psychological therapies.

  • Vittorio Sebastiano

    Vittorio Sebastiano

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The thread of Ariadne that connects germ cells, preimplatation development and pluripotent stem cells is the focus of my research, with a specific interest in human development. My long-term goals are: 1. Understanding the biology of germ cells and and their ability to sustain early preimplantation development; 2. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate very early cell fate decisions in human embryos; 3. Understanding the biology of derivation and maintenance of Pluripotent Stem Cells

  • George Segall

    George Segall

    Professor of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Scintigraphic evaluation of coronary blood flow and myocardial function using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Tumor imaging and characterization of pulmonary nodules with PET/CT.

  • Zachary M. Sellers, MD, PhD

    Zachary M. Sellers, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology)

    Bio I am a pediatric physician-scientist striving to advance cystic fibrosis clinical care and translational research. Clinically, I am focused on gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis, developing diagnostic and therapeutic modalities to improve the gastrointestinal and liver health of those with cystic fibrosis. I also specialize in the clinical management of pediatric pancreatitis and am involved with the international INSPPIRE consortium to study pediatric pancreatitis. My research spans the entire spectrum across basic science and translational research to clinical research and trials. In the laboratory, my projects are centered around understanding mechanisms of ion transport in cystic fibrosis tissues and determining how loss of CFTR ion transport leads to pathologic changes in human physiology. We are also very interested in the pathophysiological relationship between pancreatitis and intestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease. Our laboratory has expertise in epithelial ion transport, with specialized skills in the measurement of bicarbonate transport. We are also part of a Multi-PI collaboration pursuing CFTR gene editing and stem cell engraftment for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. We utilize a combination of immortalized and primary cell culture, organoids, mouse and human tissue, and whole animal in vivo studies.

  • Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We analyze multiple types of health data (EHR, Claims, Wearables, Weblogs, and Patient blogs), to answer clinical questions, generate insights, and build predictive models for the learning health system.

  • Andrew Young Shin

    Andrew Young Shin

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests SURF PROGRAM
    The SURF program is an innovative collaboration between LPCH, Stanford University Hospital and the Stanford School of Engineering. The program has focused on improving quality and safety of patient care, improving hospital operations and promoting clinical effectiveness utilizing contemporary technologies such as machine learning, mathematical optimization, simulation and a variety of statistical, probabilistic and computational tools. The program has 2 independent funding mechanism to primarily improve patient care/hospital operations and improve academics for faculty within the department of Pediatrics at LPCH.

    https://surf.stanford.edu/


    CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS
    The Clinical Effectiveness (CE) Program is a funded program that aims to understand and improve unnecessary variation in healthcare delivery in order to optimize quality of care and reduce wasteful expenditures. The CE program has developed innovative programs such as Target Based Care, an award-winning intervention to reduce variation in hospital length of stay and currently a multi-center trial involving more than 20 hospitals in North America. In 2016, the CE program included the first CE fellowship program in a pediatric training program with 3 cycles of graduates. The CE program is supported by LPCH and a philanthropic gift by Susan Choe and Thomas Tobiason.

  • Judith Shizuru

    Judith Shizuru

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy) and of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Transplantation of defined populations of allogeneic hematopoietic cells. Specifically, the way in which hematopoietic cell grafts alter antigen specific immune responses to allo-, auto- and viral antigens. The cellular and molecular basis of resistance to engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells.

  • Joseph Shrager

    Joseph Shrager

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In clinical research, Dr. Shrager has been an innovator studying outcomes in a variety of areas within Thoracic Surgery including: parenchyma-sparing operations and minimally invasive resections for lung cancer, transcervical thymectomy for myasthenia gravis, and surgical treatment of emphysema.

    In the lab, Dr. Shrager is focused on the impact of disease states upon the diaphragm. His group published the seminal paper (NEJM) describing diaphragm atrophy assoc'd with mechanical ventilation.

  • Yasuhiro Shudo, MD, PhD

    Yasuhiro Shudo, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Shudo is a board-certified cardiothoracic surgeon and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His clinical focus is the surgical treatment of end-stage cardiopulmonary failure, including heart transplant, heart-lung transplant, lung transplant, mechanical circulatory support (MCS), and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). He has published numerous landmark papers
    and chapters.

    Dr. Shudo also performs mitral valve repair/replacement (MVR), aortic valve replacement (AVR), complex valve surgery, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, reoperative cardiac surgery, minimally invasive surgery, and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR).

    Dr. Shudo is fully committed to innovative, comprehensive, and compassionate care for each patient he treats.

  • Julia Fridman Simard

    Julia Fridman Simard

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology)

    Bio Julia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women?s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford?s Epidemiology faculty in 2013. Dr. Simard studies outcomes such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases with a focus on systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently her primary research focus has shifted to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease fueled by a K01 career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. This led to collaborations with colleagues at Stanford, throughout the US, and abroad, and a series of projects focused on the diagnosis of preeclampsia and associated risks in pregnant women with systemic lupus. Dr. Simard was awarded a Peter Joseph Pappas Research Grant from the Preeclampsia Foundation for her lab's work examining preeclampsia risk in high-risk populations, and a McCormick Faculty Award from Stanford Medicine to take important steps towards disentangling preeclampsia from lupus nephritis. Dr. Simard is leading an international study of hydroxychloroquine in lupus pregnancy leveraging mixed methods in partnership with qualitative researchers, patients, clinicians, and epidemiologists in Sweden, Canada, and in the United States.

    In addition to these issues of misclassification in reproductive rheumatology questions, Dr. Simard's lab is also interested in how misclassification, missed opportunities, and misdiagnosis contribute to disparities in complex conditions such as systemic lupus. In addition to methodologic issues around misclassification and bias and the largely clinical epidemiology focus of her work, Dr. Simard's work examines social determinants of health and health disparities. Dr. Simard was recently awarded an R01 from NIH (NIAID) to study the role of cognitive and unconscious bias in clinical decision making for female-predominant diseases including lupus.

  • Robert Simoni

    Robert Simoni

    Professor, Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cholesterol in biological membranes; genetic mechanisms & cholesterol production

  • Michael Snyder

    Michael Snyder

    Stanford W. Ascherman, MD, FACS, Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
    Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling
    Modulation of BMP signaling
    BMP signaling in health and disease in the right ventricle of the heart
    "BMP signature" in blood as a biomarker
    BMP signaling in neonatal chronic lung disease

  • Joshua M. Spin

    Joshua M. Spin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Spin began his research career studying the structural biology of low density lipoprotein, and has been augmenting his skills with intensive training in molecular biology techniques, particularly those involving high-throughput genetic expression profiling. He is especially interested in vascular smooth muscle cells, and the role of smooth muscle differentiation and phenotypic switching in development and vascular disease. His latest work has focused on the biology of aortic aneurysms.

  • James Spudich

    James Spudich

    Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Disease

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The general research interest of this laboratory is the molecular basis of cell motility, with a current emphasis on power output by the human heart. We have three specific research interests, the molecular basis of energy transduction that leads to ATP-driven myosin movement on actin, the biochemical basis of the regulation of actin and myosin interaction and their assembly states, and the roles these proteins play in vivo, in cell movement, changes in cell shape and muscle contraction.

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D is a Professor of Medicine Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and by courtesy, Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Stefanick?s research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. She is currently the Principal Investigator the Women?s Health Initiative (WHI) Extension Study, having been the PI of the Stanford Clinical Center of the landmark WHI Clinical Trials and Observational Study since 1994 and Chair of the WHI Steering and Executive Committees from 1998-2011, as well as PI of the WHI Strong and Healthy (WHISH) Trial which is testing the hypothesis that a DHHS-based physical activity intervention, being delivered to a multi-ethnic cohort of about 24,000 WHI participants across the U.S., aged 68-99 when the trial started in 2015, will reduce major cardiovascular events over 8 years, compared to an equal number of ?usual activity? controls. Dr. Stefanick is also PI of the Osteoporotic Study of Men (MrOS) which is continuing to conduct clinical assessments of bone and body composition in survivors of an original cohort of nearly 6000 men aged 65 and over in 2001. As founding Director of the Stanford Women?s Health and Sex Differences in Medicine (WHSDM, ?wisdom?) Center, she plays a major role in promoting research and teaching on Sex and Gender in Human Physiology and Disease, Women?s Health and Queer Health and Medicine. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles at the Stanford School of Medicine, including as co-leader of the Population Sciences Program of the Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford?s NCI-funded comprehensive cancer center.

    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology, with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research led to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, which has been her academic home for nearly 40 years.

  • Lars Steinmetz

    Lars Steinmetz

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We apply diverse genomic approaches to understand how genetic variation affects health and disease by: 1) functional and mechanistic analyses of gene regulation, 2) studies of meiotic recombination and inheritance, 3) analyses of genetic and environmental interactions, and 4) characterization of diseases in human cells and model organisms. We integrate wet lab and computational genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic approaches, and develop technologies to enable personalized medicine.

  • Jordan Stern

    Jordan Stern

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    Bio Dr. Stern earned his medical degree at The Ohio State University College of Medicine in 2008. He completed his general surgery residency at The University of Chicago in 2015, which included a two-year research fellowship in Translational Systems Biology. He then completed his vascular and endovascular surgery fellowship at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medicine, in 2017. Dr. Stern is board certified in both general surgery and vascular surgery.

    Dr. Stern joined Stanford Vascular Surgery in 2017 as a Clinical Assistant Professor of Surgery. His primary practice is at Stanford Health Care.

    Dr. Stern?s clinical and academic interests are in the treatment of aortic disease. He is involved in the development of novel treatment strategies for complex aortic pathologies, and serves as principal investigator on several clinical trials. He is also involved in clinical research, examining contemporary practice patterns and outcomes from endovascular and open surgical interventions.

  • Simon H. Stertzer, MD, FACC,FAHA,FACP

    Simon H. Stertzer, MD, FACC,FAHA,FACP

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Coronary Angioplasty; Intramyocardial Stem cell delivery

  • Frank E. Stockdale

    Frank E. Stockdale

    Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor in the School of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Laboratory and clinical research in breast cancer ; Normal and abornal differentiation and growth

  • Ga Young Suh

    Ga Young Suh

    Adjunct Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    Bio After completion of MS/PhD from Mechanical Engineering, I've been with Division of Vascular Surgery at Stanford since 2011. I am motivated to apply Engineering-based techniques to patient anatomy or medical device. Also, I am actively teaching and training undergrad students, medical school students and trainees.

  • Katrin J Svensson

    Katrin J Svensson

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular metabolism
    Protein biochemistry
    Cell biology and function
    Animal physiology

  • James Swartz

    James Swartz

    James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Program Overview

    The world we enjoy, including the oxygen we breathe, has been beneficially created by biological systems. Consequently, we believe that innovative biotechnologies can also serve to help correct a natural world that non-natural technologies have pushed out of balance. We must work together to provide a sustainable world system capable of equitably improving the lives of over 10 billion people.
    Toward that objective, our program focuses on human health as well as planet health. To address particularly difficult challenges, we seek to synergistically combine: 1) the design and evolution of complex protein-based nanoparticles and enzymatic systems with 2) innovative, uniquely capable cell-free production technologies.
    To advance human health we focus on: a) achieving the 120 year-old dream of producing ?magic bullets?; smart nanoparticles that deliver therapeutics or genetic therapies only to specific cells in our bodies; b) precisely designing and efficiently producing vaccines that mimic viruses to stimulate safe and protective immune responses; and c) providing a rapid point-of-care liquid biopsy that will count and harvest circulating tumor cells.
    To address planet health we are pursuing biotechnologies to: a) inexpensively use atmospheric CO2 to produce commodity biochemicals as the basis for a new carbon negative chemical industry, and b) mitigate the intermittency challenges of photovoltaic and wind produced electricity by producing hydrogen either from biomass sugars or directly from sunlight.
    More than 25 years ago, Professor Swartz began his pioneering work to develop cell-free biotechnologies. The new ability to precisely focus biological systems toward efficiently addressing new, ?non-natural? objectives has proven tremendously useful as we seek to address the crucial and very difficult challenges listed above. Another critical feature of the program is the courage (or naivete) to approach important objectives that require the development and integration of several necessary-but- not-sufficient technology advances.

  • Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Professor of Radiology (Interventional Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Transarterial administration of chemotherapeutics, radioactive microspheres, and biologics for the treatment of unresectable tumors; management of portal hypertension and complications of cirrhosis (TIPS); treatment of complications of organ transplantation; Venous and pulmonary arterial thrombolysis and reconstruction; Stent and Stent-graft treatment of peripheral vascular diseases, aneurysms, aortic dissections

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