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School of Medicine


Showing 21-30 of 44 Results

  • Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We analyze multiple types of health data (EHR, Claims, Wearables, Weblogs, and Patient blogs), to answer clinical questions, generate insights, and build predictive models for the learning health system.

  • Andrew Young Shin

    Andrew Young Shin

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests SURF PROGRAM
    The SURF program is an innovative collaboration between LPCH, Stanford University Hospital and the Stanford School of Engineering. The program has focused on improving quality and safety of patient care, improving hospital operations and promoting clinical effectiveness utilizing contemporary technologies such as machine learning, mathematical optimization, simulation and a variety of statistical, probabilistic and computational tools. The program has 2 independent funding mechanism to primarily improve patient care/hospital operations and improve academics for faculty within the department of Pediatrics at LPCH.

    https://surf.stanford.edu/


    CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS
    The Clinical Effectiveness (CE) Program is a funded program that aims to understand and improve unnecessary variation in healthcare delivery in order to optimize quality of care and reduce wasteful expenditures. The CE program has developed innovative programs such as Target Based Care, an award-winning intervention to reduce variation in hospital length of stay and currently a multi-center trial involving more than 20 hospitals in North America. In 2016, the CE program included the first CE fellowship program in a pediatric training program with 3 cycles of graduates. The CE program is supported by LPCH and a philanthropic gift by Susan Choe and Thomas Tobiason.

  • Judith Shizuru

    Judith Shizuru

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy) and of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Transplantation of defined populations of allogeneic hematopoietic cells. Specifically, the way in which hematopoietic cell grafts alter antigen specific immune responses to allo-, auto- and viral antigens. The cellular and molecular basis of resistance to engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells.

  • Joseph Shrager

    Joseph Shrager

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In clinical research, Dr. Shrager has been an innovator studying outcomes in a variety of areas within Thoracic Surgery including: parenchyma-sparing operations and minimally invasive resections for lung cancer, transcervical thymectomy for myasthenia gravis, and surgical treatment of emphysema.

    In the lab, Dr. Shrager is focused on the impact of disease states upon the diaphragm. His group published the seminal paper (NEJM) describing diaphragm atrophy assoc'd with mechanical ventilation.

  • Yasuhiro Shudo, MD, PhD

    Yasuhiro Shudo, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Shudo is a board-certified cardiothoracic surgeon and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His clinical focus is the surgical treatment of end-stage cardiopulmonary failure, including heart transplant, heart-lung transplant, lung transplant, mechanical circulatory support (MCS), and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). He has published numerous landmark papers
    and chapters.

    Dr. Shudo also performs mitral valve repair/replacement (MVR), aortic valve replacement (AVR), complex valve surgery, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, reoperative cardiac surgery, minimally invasive surgery, and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR).

    Dr. Shudo is fully committed to innovative, comprehensive, and compassionate care for each patient he treats.

  • Julia Fridman Simard

    Julia Fridman Simard

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology)

    Bio Julia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women?s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford?s Epidemiology faculty in 2013. Dr. Simard studies outcomes such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases with a focus on systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently her primary research focus has shifted to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease fueled by a K01 career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. This led to collaborations with colleagues at Stanford, throughout the US, and abroad, and a series of projects focused on the diagnosis of preeclampsia and associated risks in pregnant women with systemic lupus. Dr. Simard was awarded a Peter Joseph Pappas Research Grant from the Preeclampsia Foundation for her lab's work examining preeclampsia risk in high-risk populations, and a McCormick Faculty Award from Stanford Medicine to take important steps towards disentangling preeclampsia from lupus nephritis. Dr. Simard is leading an international study of hydroxychloroquine in lupus pregnancy leveraging mixed methods in partnership with qualitative researchers, patients, clinicians, and epidemiologists in Sweden, Canada, and in the United States.

    In addition to these issues of misclassification in reproductive rheumatology questions, Dr. Simard's lab is also interested in how misclassification, missed opportunities, and misdiagnosis contribute to disparities in complex conditions such as systemic lupus. In addition to methodologic issues around misclassification and bias and the largely clinical epidemiology focus of her work, Dr. Simard's work examines social determinants of health and health disparities. Dr. Simard was recently awarded an R01 from NIH (NIAID) to study the role of cognitive and unconscious bias in clinical decision making for female-predominant diseases including lupus.

  • Robert Simoni

    Robert Simoni

    Professor, Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cholesterol in biological membranes; genetic mechanisms & cholesterol production

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