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School of Medicine


Showing 21-40 of 158 Results

  • Jun Ding

    Jun Ding

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neural circuits of movement control in health and movement disorders

  • Les Dorfman, MD

    Les Dorfman, MD

    Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical electrophysiology of the peripheral and central nervous systems, including nerve conduction velocity; electromyography (EMG); and visual, auditory and somatosensory evoked potentials. Multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and treatment. Neurological education.

  • Dawn Duane

    Dawn Duane

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a general pediatric neurologist. My interest is in clinical diagnosis and treatment of common neurologic diseases in pediatric patients and teaching feature doctors, neurologists and pediatric neurologists about pediatric neurology.

  • Shefali Dujari, MD

    Shefali Dujari, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Dujari is a neurologist who practices at Stanford Health Care ? ValleyCare in Pleasanton. She is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She is dedicated to continuously improving the quality of patient care. She places special emphasis on enhancing patient-doctor communication.

    She has made presentations to Stanford University School of Medicine on the treatment of bacterial meningitis and the management of thunderclap headaches in the emergency department. Posters co-developed by Dr. Dujari on quality improvement and patient safety advances have been presented at the Neurohospitalist Society Meeting and American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting.

    Dr. Dujari has earned honors from Stanford University School of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, and University of California, Davis. She also received the American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting resident scholarship.

    She is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society. She is also a member of the Stanford Hospital Neurology Quality Council.

    Dr. Dujari has led teams including the Resident Safety Council of Stanford Hospital, which designs and implements improvements in the patient healthcare experience, with a focus on improving communication about medication side effects. She led the wellness initiative of the Stanford Neurology Wellness and Mentoring Program to reduce resident burnout and increase peer-to-peer mentorship.

    In addition, she co-founded Dance for Health at Boston University School of Medicine, which taught dance classes at assisted living and senior centers to improve motor coordination and create a social outlet for the elderly.

  • Jeffrey Dunn, MD

    Jeffrey Dunn, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Translational research in the human application of emerging immunotherapies for neurological disease, focusing on Multiple Sclerosis, CIS, transverse myelitis and Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO). Collaborative research with Stanford and extramural scientific faculty to identify biomarkers of disease activity and treatment response in humans. Clinical trials to assess efficacy of emerging treatments for MS, CIS and NMO.

  • Emmanuel During, MD

    Emmanuel During, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Improving diagnostics and therapeutics in RBD, using home ambulatory devices including wearable actigraphy, dry-EEG, to power clinical trials based on objective outcomes of RBD activity.

    Controlling symptoms of RBD testing drugs rigorously.

    Predicting the course of neurodegeneration using deep phenotyping using clinical and serum biomarkers, measures of autonomic impairment, skin biopsy, microbiome

  • Sarah Eagleman

    Sarah Eagleman

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio For over a decade my research career as a systems neuroscientist has been centered on measuring the brain in different states of consciousness using electrophysiology. Two ways to study conscious transitions empirically are by investigating the brain during sleep and while under anesthesia. I spent my doctoral and early postdoctoral work studying how sleep improves learning and memory at the neural network level. Currently, I study the brain activity associated with anesthetic state transitions to broaden my understanding of the neural dynamics associated with altered conscious states. In fact, the brain shares similar electrophysiological activity patterns during sleep with some anesthetic transitions. With anesthetics, however, one can compare how different anesthetic agents interact with different neuromodulatory systems to cause similar behavioral outcomes (i.e. sedation and unconsciousness).

    My current projects include exploring and evaluating different computational approaches to quantify anesthetic depth using electrophysiology in various anesthetic protocols, identifying perioperative anesthesia risk factors for poor cognitive outcomes, and understanding the influence of anesthesia on neural circuits in patients with epilepsy. A thorough characterization of the brain activity associated with brain state transitions during anesthesia administration is of critical importance to better monitor patients and improve outcomes.

  • Alex N. Eischeid, MD

    Alex N. Eischeid, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Eischeid is a board-certified neurologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology, Division of Movement Disorders at Stanford University School of Medicine. He specializes in the management of a wide range of neurological conditions. His focus is on movement disorders, including Parkinson?s disease, atypical parkinsonism, Huntington?s disease, ataxia, dystonia, and tremor. He has advanced training in botulinum toxin injections for dystonia and spasticity. Dr. Eischeid also delivers expertise in deep brain stimulation programming. With each patient, his goal is to safely and effectively relieve symptoms while improving quality of life.

    Dr. Eischeid has been a presenter at the Stanford Alzheimer?s Disease Research Center Neuropathology Case Conference. He also has participated in meetings of the Movement Disorders Society and American Academy of Neurology.

    Scholarship activities of Dr. Eischeid include writing peer-reviewed articles on topics such as the intracellular signaling that enables microglia to increase neurogenesis. His work has appeared in BMC Neuroscience, the Journal of Immunology, PLoS One, and elsewhere.

    Among his honors, Dr. Eischeid received the Resident Fincham Award, given to a graduating neurology resident who best exemplifies the qualities of dedicated patient care and the highest level of collegiality. He was also named Administrative Chief Neurology Resident, an awarded position based on leadership qualities and academic performance. As a senior resident, he earned recognition as the ?Best Resident On-Call.? Dr. Eischeid is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and Movement Disorders Society. He served on the Board of Directors of the Iowa Neurological Association. In his personal time, Dr. Eischeid has provided volunteer medical services at homeless shelters.

  • Faisal Fecto

    Faisal Fecto

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Fecto is a board-certified neurologist and neuromuscular medicine specialist. Dr. Fecto completed his medical training at the Aga Khan University in Pakistan in 2005, where he was also junior faculty till 2006. Dr. Fecto completed his PhD in neuroscience at Northwestern University in 2012 during which he was supported by a University Fellowship and an NIH/NIA Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award Predoctoral Fellowship. From 2012 to 2015 he completed his post-doctoral training in neurogenetics at Northwestern University as the Link Foundation Fellow. Dr. Fecto completed his neurology residency and chief residency at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics as part of the clinical-neuroscientist and physician-scientist training programs. Dr. Fecto completed his fellowship in neuromuscular medicine at Stanford University in 2020.

    Dr. Fecto has received several awards including the resident teaching award, resident team leader award, a resident lectureship by the Iowa Neurological Association, and a fellow scholarship by the American Academy of Neurology. Dr. Fecto is a well-published researcher and serves as an associate editor for the journal BMC Neurology. His research explores the pathogenic mechanisms that contribute to neuromuscular disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and myotonic dystrophy. His research is supported by an NIH/NINDS R25 Research Education Grant. Dr. Fecto is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society, Sigma Xi Scientific Research Honor Society, American Academy of Neurology, American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine, Society for Neuroscience, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Medical Association.

  • Anna Finley Caulfield, MD

    Anna Finley Caulfield, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Finley joined the Stanford Stroke Center in 2004 from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. She cares for acute stroke patients and other neurologically critical ill patients in the intensive care unit. Currently, her research interests include hypothermia after cardiac arrest and comparing health care provider's predications of future neurological function in neurologically critical ill patients to their 6-month outcome.

  • Paul Graham Fisher, MD

    Paul Graham Fisher, MD

    Beirne Family Professor of Pediatric Neuro-Oncology, Professor of Pediatrics and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical neuro-oncology: My research explores the epidemiology, natural history, and disease patterns of brain tumors in childhood, as well as prospective clinical trials for treating these neoplasms. Research interests also include neurologic effects of cancer and its therapies, and childhood headaches.

  • Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

    Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

    The Maslah Saul, MD, Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Fisher is interested in clincal, laboratory and translational aspects of epilepsy research. Prior work has included: electrical deep brain stimulation for epilepsy, studied in laboratory models and clinical trials; drug delivery to a seizure focus; mechanisms of absence epilepsy studied with in vitro slices of brain thalamus; hyperthermic seizures; diagnosis and treatment of non-epileptic seizures, the post-ictal state; driving and epilepsy; new antiepileptic drugs; surgery for epilepsy.

  • Kara Flavin, MD

    Kara Flavin, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Current research interest is stroke recovery, including use of virtual reality and robotics for post-stroke rehabilitation.

  • David Gate

    David Gate

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Gate received his graduate degree in Integrative Biology of Disease from the University of Southern California in 2015. He joined the Wyss-Coray lab in Stanford Neurology as a postdoctoral fellow in 2015 to explore the role of adaptive immunity in neurodegeneration in collaboration with the Stanford Alzheimer?s Disease Research Center. His work focuses on the interplay between T cells and neurodegenerative disease antigens. For this work, he has received an NIH/NINDS K99, Alzheimer?s Association Young Investigator Award and a Junior Faculty Award from the AD/PD Congress. Dr. Gate joined the Stanford Neurology faculty at the Instructor level in December 2020.

  • Paul George, MD, PhD

    Paul George, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests CONDUCTIVE POLYMER SCAFFOLDS FOR STEM CELL-ENHANCED STROKE RECOVERY:
    We focus on developing conductive polymers for stem cell applications. We have created a microfabricated, polymeric system that can continuously interact with its biological environment. This interactive polymer platform allows modifications of the recovery environment to determine essential repair mechanisms. Recent work studies the effect of electrical stimulation on neural stem cells seeded on the conductive scaffold and the pathways by which it enhances stroke recovery Further understanding the combined effect of electrical stimulation and stem cells in augmenting neural repair for clinical translational is a major focus of this research going forward.

    BIOPOLYMER SYSTEMS FOR NEURAL RECOVERY AND STEM CELL MODULATION:
    The George lab develops biomaterials to improve neural recovery in the peripheral and central nervous systems. By controlled release of drugs and molecules through biomaterials we can study the temporal effect of these neurotrophic factors on neural recovery and engineer drug delivery systems to enhance regenerative effects. By identifying the critical mechanisms for stroke and neural recovery, we are able to develop polymeric technologies for clinical translation in nerve regeneration and stroke recovery. Recent work utilizing these novel conductive polymers to differentiate stem cells for therapeutic and drug discovery applications.

    APPLYING ENGINEERING TECHNIQUES TO DETERMINE BIOMARKERS FOR STROKE DIAGNOSTICS:
    The ability to create diagnostic assays and techniques enables us to understand biological systems more completely and improve clinical management. Previous work utilized mass spectroscopy proteomics to find a simple serum biomarker for TIAs (a warning sign of stroke). Our study discovered a novel candidate marker, platelet basic protein. Current studies are underway to identify further candidate biomarkers using transcriptome analysis. More accurate diagnosis will allow for aggressive therapies to prevent subsequent strokes.

  • Carl Gold

    Carl Gold

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Gold is a board-certified general neurologist who is fellowship-trained in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders in hospitalized patients. He cares for a broad range of patients, including individuals with seizures, central nervous system infections, autoimmune diseases, headaches, neuromuscular conditions, and neurological complications of cancer. Dr. Gold has a particular clinical interest in the inpatient diagnosis of uncommon or rare neurological disorders. He directs quality improvement for the department of Neurology and is actively involved in projects to improve the experience of hospitalized patients with neurological conditions at Stanford. His primary research interest focuses on enhancing the communication skills of neurology residents and he serves as the Director of the Stanford Neurology Residency Communication Coaching Program. He is also the Fellowship Director of the Stanford Neurohospitalist Fellowship.

    For more information on the Stanford Neurohospitalist Program & Fellowship, please visit: https://med.stanford.edu/neurology/divisions/neurohospitalist.html

    Additional information on Stanford Neurology's efforts in Quality, Safety, & Value can be found here: http://med.stanford.edu/neurology/quality.html

    Learn more about the Stanford Neurology Communication Coaching Program by visiting: http://med.stanford.edu/neurology/education/resident-coaching.html

  • Olga Fedin Goldberg

    Olga Fedin Goldberg

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Goldberg is board-certified in Neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. She provides comprehensive neurologic care to patients with a broad range of neurologic conditions, including those who have multiple neurologic conditions. She is interested in medical education for neurology residents and for referring primary care providers and serves as Director of Neurology Resident Continuity Clinic. Additionally, she completed the Stanford CELT (Clinical Education Leadership Training) Program for developing skills in quality improvement. She has led or played a key role in multiple quality improvement projects in the Department of Neurology, including those focused on increasing patient understanding of their neurologic medications upon hospital discharge, improvement of outcomes for headache patients seen in primary care, and in optimizing clinic processes involved in collection of cerebrospinal fluid.

  • Neelam Goyal, MD

    Neelam Goyal, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Goyal specializes in the diagnosis, management, and electrophysiological testing of neuromuscular diseases. Her clinical interests include immune-mediated neuromuscular disorders (myositis, myasthenia gravis, CIDP, and vasculitis) and ALS. She performs SFEMG for diagnosis of neuromuscular junction disorders, and provides botulinum toxin for treatment of sialorrhea for ALS patients.

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