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School of Medicine


Showing 51-100 of 117 Results

  • Theodore Leng, MD, FACS

    Theodore Leng, MD, FACS

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Leng was the first surgeon in California to perform a subretinal transplant of adult neural stem cells into patients with macular degeneration and is actively researching cellular, biologic and laser-based therapies for macular degeneration. He also has an active program in imaging informatics and deep learning to perform big data analyses of retinal scans to identify patients who are at risk for retinal disease deterioration. The end goal is earlier detection and rapid treatment to maximize visual outcomes.

    Dr. Leng is considered a leading expert on optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT-based angiography (OCTA), a non-invasive and non-contact imaging technique for the retina. He is also considered a key opinion leader in artificial intelligence and data science.

  • Y. Joyce Liao, MD, PhD

    Y. Joyce Liao, MD, PhD

    Professor of Ophthalmology and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Ischemic optic neuropathy
    Stem cell transplantation
    Optic neuropathy
    Optic neuritis
    Eye movement disorders
    Reading
    Parkinson's disease
    Multiple sclerosis

  • Charles C. Lin, MD

    Charles C. Lin, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Lin spearheads the Cornea Transplant Program at Stanford and his research interests include improving the success and safety of cutting edge surgeries such as ultra-thin DSAEK, DMEK, and DALK. He is actively researching surgical therapies for corneal edema and Fuchs' Dystrophy. He is among a handful of cornea specialists nationwide with extensive experience using intraoperative OCT imaging to perform cornea transplants.

  • Vinit Mahajan, MD, PhD

    Vinit Mahajan, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our focus is the development of personalized medicine for eye diseases through translation of our discoveries in proteomics, genomics, and phenomics in humans, mice and tissue culture models.

  • Edward Manche, MD

    Edward Manche, MD

    Professor of Ophthalmology

    Bio Edward E. Manche, MD is Professor of Ophthalmology and Director of the Cornea and Refractive Surgery Service at Stanford University School of Medicine. He received his medical degree from Albert Einstein College of Medicine and completed residency training at the University of Medicine and Dentistry at New Jersey where he served as Chief Resident. He completed a two-year fellowship in Cornea and Refractive Surgery at the Jules Stein Eye Institute at UCLA.

    Dr. Manche is a fellow of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and received its Achievement Award in 2003 and its Senior Achievement Award in 2014. He was elected to active membership in the American Ophthalmological Society in 2011, and is recognized in Best Doctors in America and Guide to America's Top Physicians. He serves on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Ophthalmology, Journal of Ophthalmology, Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology and Journal of Refractive Surgery.

    He lectures widely on topics in cornea and refractive surgery and has published over 115 peer-reviewed articles and 25 book chapters.

  • Michael Marmor, MD

    Michael Marmor, MD

    Professor of Ophthalmology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research concerns diseases of retinal function, techniques of clinical electrophysiology, and experimental studies on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) function including fluid transport and retinal adhesiveness. Other studies consider aspects of vision and art, and ophthalmic history.
    Published over 300 journal articles, chapters, books (only selected articles listed).

  • Artis A. Montague, MD, PhD

    Artis A. Montague, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Multicenter Catalys Consortium Trial - To compare femtosecond laser assisted cataract surgery with conventional cataract surgery

  • Darius M. Moshfeghi, MD

    Darius M. Moshfeghi, MD

    Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Moshfeghi leads the Stanford University Network for Diagnosis of Retinopathy of Prematurity (SUNDROP network). The SUNDROP network utilizes RetCam 3 cameras to provide remote screening of retinopathy of prematurity at outlying neonatal intensive care units. Active sites include Dominican Hospital, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, and O'Connor Hospital.

  • Heather E. Moss, MD, PhD

    Heather E. Moss, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a clinician scientist with a background in engineering, epidemiology and neuro-ophthalmology. In my research, I combine tools from these disciplines with the goal of understanding and preventing vision loss from optic nerve diseases. My focus is on papilledema, the swelling of the optic nerve head due to elevation in intracranial pressure, which we are characterizing using electrophysiological and imaging techniques. Other areas of interest are peri-operative vision loss and optic neuritis.

  • Prithvi Mruthyunjaya, MD, MHS

    Prithvi Mruthyunjaya, MD, MHS

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr Mruthyunjaya has maintained a broad research interest with publications in both ocular oncology and retinal diseases.
    His focus is on multi-modal imaging of ocular tumors and understanding imaging clues that may predict vision loss after ocular radiation therapy. He coordinates multi-center research on the role of genetic testing and outcomes of treatments of ocular melanoma.
    In the field of retinal diseases, his interests are in intra-operative imaging to enhance surgical accuracy.

  • David Myung, MD, PhD

    David Myung, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Novel biomaterials to reconstruct the wounded cornea
    Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for corneal and ocular surface regeneration
    Engineered biomolecule therapies for promote corneal wound healing

    Telemedicine in ophthalmology

  • Quan Dong Nguyen, MD, MSc

    Quan Dong Nguyen, MD, MSc

    Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We have focused our research on the development of novel therapies and innovative assessment and diagnostic imaging technologies for retinal vascular and ocular inflammatory disorders, specifically diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and uveitis. Building on our initial work describing the role of hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME), We have become interested in the biochemical mechanisms that would presumably lead to DME. During the past decade, our research has contributed to the body of evidences that defines the important role of anti-VEGF therapies in DME and AMD, as well as the role of the mTOR pathway and various interleukins in the pathogenesis of uveitis.

    We have launched a productive and well-funded clinical research program while at the same time providing clinical care to patients with uveitis and retinal vascular diseases and fulfilling significant teaching and administrative assignments. We have established a number of key collaborators both within and outside the institutions. In addition, we have also established Center in Baltimore and now in Silicon Valley, which has excelled in conducting proof-of concept, early-phase multi-center clinical trials and studies, exploring the clinical disease manifestations and the efficacy of various pharmacologic agents in retinal, uveitic, and ocular inflammatory disorders.

  • Daniel Palanker, PhD

    Daniel Palanker, PhD

    Professor of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Interactions of electric field and light with biological cells and tissues and their applications to imaging, diagnostics, therapeutics and prosthetics, primarily in ophthalmology.
    Specific fields of interest:
    Electronic retinal prosthesis;
    Electronic enhancement of tear secretion;
    Electronic control of blood vessels;
    Non-damaging retinal laser therapy;
    Ultrafast laser surgery;
    Interferometric imaging of neural signals;
    Cell transplantation and retinal plasticity.

  • Carolyn Pan, MD

    Carolyn Pan, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Ophthalmology

    Bio Dr. Pan is a board-certified ophthalmologist and fellowship-trained vitreoretinal surgeon. She focuses on retinal vascular diseases, macular degeneration, and surgical repair of retinal detachments, macular pathology, and complications from cataract surgery. She has co-authored peer-reviweed articles on topics ranging from optical coherence tomography imaging to embryonic stem cells for macular degeneration.

    In addition to her clinical practice, she is dedicated to the education and training of medical students, residents, and fellows. As recognition of her efforts, she received the Faculty Teaching Award in 2016 from the Byers Eye Institute at Stanford University.

    Dr. Pan's clinical practice is mainly based at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, where she serves as chief of the retina service.

  • Suzann Pershing, MD

    Suzann Pershing, MD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Bio Dr. Pershing is on the ophthalmology faculty at Stanford University School of Medicine, with an academic career blending clinical practice, teaching, research, and administration. She serves as Program Director for the Stanford University Medical Center ophthalmology residency and Chief of Ophthalmology for the VA Palo Alto Health Care System.

    In her role as residency program director, she is excited to innovate and implement novel approaches to residency education?such as establishing the 4-year research track residency program (SOAR), opportunities for resident elective scholarly activity, and efforts to develop a valuable internship program for incoming ophthalmology residents at Stanford.

    Her research interests focus on improved utilization of big data, biomedical informatics techniques, and evidence-based medicine to study outcomes, health care utilization, disease progression, and cost-effectiveness of ophthalmic treatment. Dr. Pershing is active in big data initiatives and analysis, including collaborative projects at Stanford and serving as site PI for the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) IRIS Registry analytic group at Stanford. She also serves as the AAO representative to the American Board of Medical Specialties task force on Information and Data Sharing, focusing on collaboration among specialty boards and societies to use data sources such as national clinical registries to facilitate improved quality of care, continuing certification, and practice and outcomes assessments. Dr. Pershing is also is involved in health policy efforts, including helping to develop CMS episode-based cost measures for MIPS, and is interested in health care innovation?technology, quality, and delivery systems.

    Dr. Pershing serves on the national board of directors of the Alpha Omega Alpha medical honor society, with focus on resident and faculty development initiatives, and mentors both medical students and undergraduate students.

  • Daniel Rubin

    Daniel Rubin

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford), of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research) and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology and of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interest is imaging informatics--ways computers can work with images to leverage their rich information content and to help physicians use images to guide personalized care. Work in our lab thus lies at the intersection of biomedical informatics and imaging science.

  • Steven Sanislo, MD

    Steven Sanislo, MD

    Clinical Professor, Ophthalmology

    Bio Dr Sanislo has over 20 years of experience in clinical and surgical practice in retinal and vitreoretinal diseases. He is the senior vitreoretinal surgeon at Stanford and maintains a large clinical practice as well as teaching ophthalmology residents and retina fellows. He also participates in clincal reasearch for varying retinal conditions. Dr. Sanislo recieved ophthalmology training as a resident here at Stanford, and recieved vitreoretinal training as a fellow at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation.

    Research interests include treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and other retinal diseases.

    Dr. Sanislo has extensive clinical and surgical experience in the following diseases:
    - Age-related macular degeneration
    - Posterior uveitis / infectious and inflammatory disease of the posterior segment
    - Diabetic retinopathy
    - Myopic degeneration / pathologic myopia
    - Macular pucker / epiretinal membranes
    - Macular hole
    - Repair of simple and complex retinal detachments
    - Macular edema
    - Retinal vascular occlusion

  • Ann Shue, MD

    Ann Shue, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Ophthalmology

    Bio **Dr. Shue is taking new patients for glaucoma, cataracts, and adult strabismus.**

    Ann Shue, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at Stanford University School of Medicine, where she specializes in glaucoma, pediatric ophthalmology, and adult strabismus, a unique combination of subspecializations practiced by few surgeons worldwide. She is a board-certified ophthalmologist who completed fellowships in glaucoma at Yale University and pediatric ophthalmology and adult strabismus at Duke University. She practices at the Stanford Byers Eye Institute and the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital.

    Dr. Shue loves seeing patients of all ages with eye problems big or small, including glaucoma due to any reason, glaucoma suspicion, family history of glaucoma, cataracts, strabismus (eye misalignment) or double vision from any cause, including after eye surgeries. She completed her ophthalmology residency at the University of Pittsburgh and an internal medicine internship at UCSF Fresno. She holds a medical degree from University of California, Irvine and an undergraduate degree in biology from Yale University.

    Dr. Shue is a member of the American Glaucoma Society, the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, and the UK Paediatric Glaucoma Society. She is active in presenting at regional and national conferences. She is the author of several journal articles and recently wrote two textbook chapters on pediatric glaucoma and pediatric glaucoma surgery.

  • Kuldev Singh, MD, MPH

    Kuldev Singh, MD, MPH

    Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Glaucoma, clinical epidemiology

  • Stephen Smith, MD

    Stephen Smith, MD

    Clinical Instructor, Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests RESEARCH OVERVIEW

    Dr. Smith?s primary professional interest is developing solutions for unmet clinical and surgical vitreoretinal needs. Beginning in medical school, one of his primary focuses has been improving treatment outcomes in patients with retinoblastoma (RB). During his second year in medical school Dr. Smith published a manuscript on a novel technique to reduce the risk of tumor spread following intravitreal drug delivery in patients with RB. His work summarizing published data on tumor spread following intravitreal injection therapy (IVT) for RB has resulted in multiple platform presentations at national and international meetings, including an invited lecture at ARVO 2014. The results of this study influenced the growing trend toward broader acceptance of intravitreal chemotherapy in pediatric patients with treatment-resistant retinoblastoma vitreous seeds. A primary active area of research has included studying and publishing on ocular toxicity that results from the use of intravitreal melphalan and other agents for RB. This work, and subsequent publications from leaders in the field, has led to an increased awareness of ocular toxicity caused by injecting chemotherapeutic agents into the eyes of young children. This highlighted the need for toxicity data on additional chemotherapeutic agents for local delivery. To answer this question, Dr. Smith assembled an excellent group of collaborators and consultants, including internationally known experts at Bascom Palmer, Mayo Clinic, and Emory University. As a resident he secured a highly competitive career starter grant from the Knights Templar Foundation and used that funding and the expertise of his collaborators to carry out preclinical ocular toxicity studies of combination intravitreal chemotherapy for RB. His work in RB has led to a broader recognition of the challenges facing patients with RB who receive IVT and has led to a continued search for optimal local injectable therapies for patients with this disease.


    INNOVATION HIGHLIGHTS

    In addition to his work in retinoblastoma, Dr. Smith has been actively involved in developing technologies to improve outcomes for patients receiving intravitreal injection therapy (IVT) for macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusions and more. IVT has become the most common procedure performed by retina specialists in the United States, with an estimated 6 million injections given in the United States alone in 2016. Dr. Smith has co-developed technology that simplifies and streamlines the IVT process, removing barriers to treatment and improving patient outcomes. His work in innovation covers pre-clinical and clinical development work, and has given him expertise in diverse subject areas including fundraising, intellectual property portfolio development, team building, and business administration. He is a co-founder of iRenix Medical, a biotechnology and medical device start-up company committed to improving vision through optimization of the IVT process.

    Dr. Smith remains dedicated to helping improve and restore vision and quality of life in patients with vitreoretinal disease. He is currently involved in both medical device and pharmaceutical innovation, and serves as a mentor for the Stanford University Biodesign Innovation Course.

  • Creed Stary

    Creed Stary

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD) and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanisms promoting neuronal survival following cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury; utilizing microRNA's to target multiple pathways to promote mitochondrial homeostasis and cell survival; anesthetic neurotoxicity; astrocyte-neuronal interaction

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