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School of Medicine


Showing 301-350 of 467 Results

  • Arogyaswami Paulraj

    Arogyaswami Paulraj

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    Bio Professor Emeritus Arogyaswami Paulraj, Stanford University, is a pioneer of MIMO wireless communications, a technology break through that enables improved wireless performance. MIMO is now incorporated into all new wireless systems.

    Paulraj is the author of over 400 research papers, two textbooks, and a co-inventor in 80 US patents.

    Paulraj has won over a dozen awards, notably the National Inventors Hall of Fame (USPTO), Marconi Prize and Fellowship, 2014 and the IEEE Alexander Graham Bell Medal, 2011. He is a fellow of eight scientific / engineering national academies including the US, China, India, and Sweden. He is a fellow of IEEE and AAAS.

    In 1999, Paulraj founded Iospan Wireless Inc. - which developed and established MIMO-OFDMA wireless as the core 4G technology. Iospan was acquired by Intel Corporation in 2003. In 2004, he co-founded Beceem Communications Inc. The company became the market leader in 4G-WiMAX semiconductor and was acquired by Broadcom Corp. in 2010. In 2014 he founded Rasa Networks to develop Machine Learning tools for WiFi Networks. The company was acquired HPE in 2016.

    During his 30 years in the Indian (Navy) (1961-1991), he founded three national-level laboratories in India and headed one of India?s most successful military R&D projects ? APSOH sonar. He received over a dozen awards (many at the national level) in India including the Padma Bhushan, Ati Vishist Seva Medal and the VASVIK Medal.

  • John M. Pauly

    John M. Pauly

    Reid Weaver Dennis Professor

    Bio Interests include medical imaging generally, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular. Current efforts are focused on medical applications of MRI where real-time interactive imaging is important. Two examples are cardiac imaging, and the interactive guidance of interventional procedures. Specific interests include rapid methods for the excitation and acquisition of the MR signal, and the reconstruction of images from the data acquired using these approaches.

  • Ronald Pearl

    Ronald Pearl

    Dr. Richard K. and Erika N. Richards Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanims (molecular and cellular) of pulmonary hypertension, treatment of pulmonary hypertension, treatment of respiratory failure, treatment of septic shock, hemodynamic monitoring

  • Norbert Pelc

    Norbert Pelc

    Boston Scientific Applied Biomedical Engineering Professor and Professor of Radiology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Broadly, Dr. Pelc is interested in the physics, engineering and mathematics of medical imaging, especially computed tomography, digital x-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and hybrid multimodality systems. His current research is concentrated in the development of computed tomography systems with higher image quality and dose efficiency, in the characterization of system performance, and in the development and validation of new clinical applications.

  • Marco Perez

    Marco Perez

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Bio Dr. Marco Perez's research goal is to better understand the fundamental causes of cardiovascular disease through the study of genetics and epidemiology. His group studies the genetic variations and environmental exposures that are associated with conditions such as atrial fibrillation and heart failure. He has led the studies of atrial fibrillation in Women's Health Initiative, one of the largest nation-wide population-based cohorts. He is currently conducting a large study monitoring for silent or asymptomatic atrial fibrillation in women from the WHI randomized to exercise intervention, and is co-PI in the Apple Heart Study, a clinical trial using the Apple Watch to screen for atrial fibrillation. He is interested in understanding the paradox that atrial fibrillation is less common in African Americans and Hispanics, despite a greater burden of risk factors such as hypertension. As director of the Stanford Inherited Arrhythmia Clinic, he evaluates families with rare inherited arrhythmias associated with sudden death such as Long QT and Brugada Syndromes and explores their links with novel genes. He is particularly interested in studying the genetic causes of very early onset atrial fibrillation. He also studies how best to use the electrocardiogram to identify patients at risk for atrial fibrillation and athletes at risk for life-threatening arrhythmias due to conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. His genetic studies have led to the discovery of promising novel therapeutic targets that his group is now studying at a functional level. Dr. Perez receives funding from NIH/NHLBI (R01), Apple Inc., the Weston Havens Foundation, The Stanford Cardiovascular Division and the Stanford SPARK program.

  • Mark Perlroth, MD

    Mark Perlroth, MD

    Professor (Clinical) of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Adult Congenital Heart Disease
    2. Cardiac Transplantation
    3. General Cardiology
    4. Porphyrias

  • Ada Poon

    Ada Poon

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on providing theoretical foundations and engineering platforms for realizing electronics that seamlessly integrate with the body. Such systems will allow precise recording or modulation of physiological activity, for advancing basic scientific discovery and for restoring or augmenting biological functions for clinical applications.

  • Richard Popp

    Richard Popp

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Academic-Industrial relations; Ethics of invention.

  • Matthew Porteus

    Matthew Porteus

    Sutardja Chuk Professor of Definitive and Curative Medicine

    Bio Dr. Porteus was raised in California and was a local graduate of Gunn High School before completing A.B. degree in ?History and Science? at Harvard University where he graduated Magna Cum Laude and wrote an thesis entitled ?Safe or Dangerous Chimeras: The recombinant DNA controversy as a conflict between differing socially constructed interpretations of recombinant DNA technology.? He then returned to the area and completed his combined MD, PhD at Stanford Medical School with his PhD focused on understanding the molecular basis of mammalian forebrain development with his PhD thesis entitled ?Isolation and Characterization of TES-1/DLX-2: A Novel Homeobox Gene Expressed During Mammalian Forebrain Development.? After completion of his dual degree program, he was an intern and resident in Pediatrics at Boston Children?s Hospital and then completed his Pediatric Hematology/Oncology fellowship in the combined Boston Chidlren?s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute program. For his fellowship and post-doctoral research he worked with Dr. David Baltimore at MIT and CalTech where he began his studies in developing homologous recombination as a strategy to correct disease causing mutations in stem cells as definitive and curative therapy for children with genetic diseases of the blood, particularly sickle cell disease. Following his training with Dr. Baltimore, he took an independent faculty position at UT Southwestern in the Departments of Pediatrics and Biochemistry before again returning to Stanford in 2010 as an Associate Professor. During this time his work has been the first to demonstrate that gene correction could be achieved in human cells at frequencies that were high enough to potentially cure patients and is considered one of the pioneers and founders of the field of genome editing?a field that now encompasses thousands of labs and several new companies throughout the world. His research program continues to focus on developing genome editing by homologous recombination as curative therapy for children with genetic diseases but also has interests in the clonal dynamics of heterogeneous populations and the use of genome editing to better understand diseases that affect children including infant leukemias and genetic diseases that affect the muscle. Clinically, Dr. Porteus attends at the Lucille Packard Children?s Hospital where he takes care of pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  • Guillem Pratx

    Guillem Pratx

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Physical Oncology Lab is interested in making a lasting impact on translational cancer research by building novel physical tools and methods.

  • James Priest

    James Priest

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Priest lab seeks a better understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of congenital heart disease using translational genomics, big-data, and vertebrate models of cardiac development.

  • Stephen Quake

    Stephen Quake

    Lee Otterson Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Bioengineering, of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Single molecule biophysics, precision force measurement, micro and nano fabrication with soft materials, integrated microfluidics and large scale biological automation.

  • Thomas Quertermous, MD

    Thomas Quertermous, MD

    William G. Irwin Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Understanding genetic basis of cardiovascular function and disease.

  • James Quinn

    James Quinn

    Professor of Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Quinn's primary focus is emergency care research with previous experience running large multi-center trials.. He has an extensive research background in clinical decision making involving patients with syncope and in the development and clinical evaluation of tissue adhesives. He is currently focused on the use of machine learning and artificial intelligence algorithms to augment physician decision making and personalizing the care of patients.

  • Marlene Rabinovitch

    Marlene Rabinovitch

    Dwight and Vera Dunlevie Professor of Pediatric Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research program seeks to identify the cellular and molecular programs regulating vascular and lung development, through the use of cultured cells and tissues and mouse and rat models. We then determine how these programs are perturbed by genetic abnormalities or injurious processes associated with disease, focusing on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a fatal complication in children with heart defects, and a condition of unknown etiology primarily in young women.

  • Ralph Rabkin

    Ralph Rabkin

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr Rabkin is examining the mechanism of the acquired resistance to hormones that develops in kidney failure.In particular he is studying the impact of kidney failure on the action of growth hormone and the role of impaired signal transduction as a cause of growth hormone resistance. He is also engaged in the study of growth factors in diabetic kidney disease.

  • Thomas Raffin

    Thomas Raffin

    The Colleen and Robert Haas Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Raffin is a clinician, teacher and investigator. He retired as Chief of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine in 2004. His key areas of academic interest include the biology and management of acute lung injury; basic biology of human lung and white cells; and, key issues in biomedical ethics including withholding and withdrawing life support, health care delivery, genomics, genetic screening, and neuroethics.

  • Chandra Ramamoorthy

    Chandra Ramamoorthy

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Pediatric)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuro protection and neurologic outcomes in cardiac patients prior to and concurrent with cardiac surgery and catheterization

  • ThomasRando, MD, PhD

    ThomasRando, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms regulating stem cell function, the effects of aging on skeletal muscle and skeletal muscle stem cells, and the pathogenesis and experimental therapeutics for hereditary muscle diseases, specifically the muscular dystrophies.

  • Anoop Rao

    Anoop Rao

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Wearable senors, unobtrusive vital sign monitoring, natural language processing/text mining

  • Natalie L. Rasgon

    Natalie L. Rasgon

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Rasgon has been involved in longitudinal placebo-controlled neuroendocrine studies for nearly two decades, and she has been involved in neuroendocrine and brain imaging studies of estrogen effects on depressed menopausal women for the last eight years. It should be noted that in addition to her duties as a Professor of Psychiatry and Obstetrics & Gynecology, Dr. Rasgon is also the Director of the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Program and of the Women's Wellness Program.

  • Mohammad Reza Rasouli, MD

    Mohammad Reza Rasouli, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Bio Dr. Rasouli is a board-certified anesthesiologist specializing in pain management. He practices at Stanford Health Care ? ValleyCare in Pleasanton. He is also a clinical assistant professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative & Pain Medicine.

    Dr. Rasouli takes pride in developing a comprehensive, compassionate treatment plan personalized to each patient in his care. His goals are to
    relieve patients? chronic pain, and enable them to enjoy the best possible
    quality of life. In addition to his clinical practice, Dr. Rasouli has conducted research and published extensively. He was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Rothman Institute of Orthopaedics at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia.

    Dr. Rasouli has presented the findings of his research at conferences such as the North American Neuromodulation Society Annual Meeting, American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Meeting, American Society of Anesthesiology Annual Meeting, International Anesthesia Research Society Annual Meeting, and Society of Critical Care Anesthesiologists Annual Meeting. Topics have included using spinal cord and peripheral nerve stimulation for treatment of pain, perioperative pain management, and post-surgical recovery.

    He has published more than 100 articles in the peer-reviewed journals Anesthesiology, Anesthesia and Analgesia, Neurosurgery, Lancet, JAMA, Annals of Surgery, and elsewhere. He also has co-authored chapters in Spine Trauma, Epidemiology of Spinal Cord Injuries, Pain Management Following Total Hip Arthroplasty and Total Knee Arthroplasty, and Epidemiology, Diagnosis and Treatment of Sciatica, and other textbooks.

    Dr. Rasouli has earned numerous honors including the Dr. Jeffrey and Celia Joseph Anesthesiology Scholarly Achievement Award. He is a member of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, California Society of Anesthesiologists, American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, North American Neuromodulation Society, American Society of Pain and Neuroscience, and Society of Critical Care Medicine.

  • KristyRed-Horse

    KristyRed-Horse

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiovascular developmental biology

  • Olaf Reinhartz

    Olaf Reinhartz

    Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Mechanical circulatory support in failing Fontan circulation
    2. Pathophysiologic response to fetal cardiac surgery.
    3. Various clinical projects in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery

  • June-Wha Rhee

    June-Wha Rhee

    Instructor, Cardiovascular Institute

    Bio Dr. Rhee is a general cardiologist with specialized clinical and research training in cardiovascular drug toxicity and pharmacogenomics. She completed clinical cardiology fellowship and internal medicine residency training at Stanford University School of Medicine. During her post-doctoral training, Dr. Rhee's research focused on elucidating cardiotoxic effects of iron overload and of multiple chemotherapeutic agents using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived models. Her current research employs clinical data, population genomics, and patient-derived iPSCs models to study genetic determinants and mechanisms of drug-induced cardiovascular toxicities. Dr. Rhee's clinic sees cardio-oncology patients and focuses on devising new methods for minimizing cardiovascular complications in that population.

  • Juan Rivas-Davila

    Juan Rivas-Davila

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Modern applications demand power capabilities beyond what is presently achievable. High performance systems need high power density and bandwidth that are difficult to achieve.
    Power density can be improved with better semiconductors and passive componets, and by reducing the energy storage requirements of the system. By dramatically increasing switching frequency it is possible to reduce size of power converters. I'm interested in high performance/frequency circuits switching >10 MHz.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Professor of Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Allan and Tina Neill Professor of Lymphatic Research and Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical research includes studies on risk factor modification in atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease; clinical trials involving medical therapies for peripheral arterial insufficiency; coronary angiogenesis; therapy of lymphedema; atherand photodynamic therapy in atherosclerosis.

  • Fatima Rodriguez

    Fatima Rodriguez

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Bio Fatima Rodriguez, MD, MPH is an Assistant Professor in Cardiovascular Medicine and (by courtesy) the Stanford Prevention Research Center. She received her MD and MPH from Harvard and completed her cardiovascular fellowship at Stanford. She has expertise in cardiovascular prevention and promoting health equity in cardiovascular care and research. She completed her residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital and a fellowship in Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University. She specializes in common cardiac conditions such as coronary artery disease, valvular heart disease, lipid disorders, and cardiovascular risk assessment in high-risk populations.

    Dr. Rodriguez?s research includes a range of topics relating to racial, ethnic, and gender disparities in cardiovascular disease prevention and developing novel interventions to address disparities.

  • Angela Rogers

    Angela Rogers

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We use genetics and genomics methodologies to identify novel ARDS pathobiology; we hope that this will enable identification of novel biomarkers, phenotypes, and treatments for the disease. We are building a plasma biobank of critically ill patients at Stanford, with a particular focus on metabolic changes in critical illness.

  • Rajat Rohatgi

    Rajat Rohatgi

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests the overall goal of my laboratory is to uncover new regulatory mechanisms in signaling systems, to understand how these mechanisms are damaged in disease states, and to devise new strategies to repair their function.

  • Allyson Rosen, Ph.D.

    Allyson Rosen, Ph.D.

    Clinical Associate Professor (Affiliated) [Vapahcs], Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Bio RESEARCH FOCUS
    Translational cognitive neuroscience of aging and dementia. Neuroethics.

    TRAINING
    Dr. Rosen is board certified in clinical neuropsychology with a geriatric focus. She completed college at Brown University, a clinical psychology Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University, clinical neuropsychology internship at the Long Island Jewish Hospital in New York, and clinical neuropsychology postdoctoral fellowship at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Rosen completed specialty research fellowship training at the National Institute on Aging (Intramural Research Training Award) and Stanford (NRSA F32, K01) in functional imaging and noninvasive brain stimulation with support from NIA.

    CLINICAL AND RESEARCH ACTIVITIES
    Dr. Rosen is Director of Dementia Education at the Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center at the Palo Alto VAHCS. She is also a neuropsychologist and part of the consensus clinical group and education core at the Stanford?s Alzheimer?s Disease Research Center (NIA). Dr. Rosen?s funded research has focused on applying cognitive neuroscience of aging to improve clinical practice in older adults by using cognitive measures, brain imaging, and noninvasive brain stimulation such as TMS. Studies include using fMRI as an outcome measure for cognitive training, studying how to improve the accuracy of transcranial magnetic stimulation targeting with and without image guidance, and using structural MRI to avoid postoperative cognitive decline and improve outcome from carotid vascular procedures. She has a longstanding commitment to neuroethics and leads a feature in the Journal of Alzheimer Disease that focuses on ethical issues in new and emerging AD applications.

    ETHICS EDITOR, JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
    Ethics Review
    http://www.j-alz.com/blogs/discussion/protecting-progress

    MIRECC DEMENTIA EDUCATION
    http://www.mirecc.va.gov/visn21/education/dementia_education.asp

  • Glenn Rosen

    Glenn Rosen

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory examines apoptotic and cell signaling pathways in cancer and lung disease. We are studying signaling pathways that regulate oxidative stress responses and cancer cell growth. Part of these studies focus on analysis of non-canonical transcription regulatory functions of the TERC and Tert components of telomerase in lung disease and cancer.

  • David Rosenthal

    David Rosenthal

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests include the study of Heart Failure, Cardiomyopathy and ventricular dysfunction in children, from a clinical perspective. Investigations include clinical trials of medications, cardiac resynchronization, and mechanical circulatory support.

  • Elsie Gyang Ross

    Elsie Gyang Ross

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (Vascular Surgery) and of Medicine (BMIR)

    Bio Dr. Ross is a vascular surgeon and research scientist. She graduated from Stanford University School of Medicine in 2011 and completed her vascular surgery 0+5 residency at Stanford University School of Medicine in 2018. During her residency, she completed a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in biomedical informatics. Her current research focuses on using machine learning and electronic health records for early disease identification, precision medicine, and evaluating opportunities to engage in patient education beyond the clinic.

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