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School of Medicine


Showing 141-158 of 158 Results

  • Reena Thomas, MD PhD

    Reena Thomas, MD PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests -Neuro Oncology Immunotherapy
    -Health Equity
    -Medical Education

  • Zachary David Threlkeld

    Zachary David Threlkeld

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Threlkeld cares for critically ill patients with acute neurologic illness, including traumatic brain injury, stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and epilepsy. He completed his residency training in neurology at the University of California, San Francisco, and joined the Stanford Neurocritical Care program after completing fellowship training in neurocritical care at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women?s Hospital in Boston. He has a particular clinical and research interest in traumatic brain injury. His research uses advanced imaging modalities like functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to better understand disorders of consciousness.

  • Keith Van Haren, MD

    Keith Van Haren, MD

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research group is dedicated to innovating care for children with degenerative brain disorders. We are particularly focused on genetic and autoimmune disorders that cause damage to the myelin (the fatty insulation around the nerves) of the brain and spinal cord. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (genetic) and multiple sclerosis (autoimmune) are the prototypical examples of degenerative disorders of myelin and are the two disorders we study most intensively.

  • Chitra Venkatasubramanian, MBBS, MD

    Chitra Venkatasubramanian, MBBS, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in the study of the radiological characteristics and temporal profile of edema/ tissue injury in the perihematomal area around spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. I am also interested in developing protocols for emergent reversal of anticoagulation in a life-threatening hemorrhage situation.

  • Nirali Vora

    Nirali Vora

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Nirali Vora is a Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology and Neurological sciences at Stanford University. She is board certified in Adult Neurology and Vascular Neurology after completing her residency and advanced fellowship training at Stanford. She provides comprehensive care for all stroke patients, as well as hospitalized adults with acute or undiagnosed neurological conditions. She specializes in treating vascular disorders including TIA, vasculitis, dissection, venous thrombosis, and undetermined or ?cryptogenic? causes of stroke.

    Dr. Vora directs the Stanford Global Health Neurology program, through which she started the first stroke unit in Zimbabwe and gained experience in HIV neurology and other neuro-infectious diseases. Additional research interests include stroke prevention, TIA triage, eliminating disparities in health care, and neurology education. She is also the Director of the Stanford Adult Neurology Residency Program.

  • Jessica Walter

    Jessica Walter

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Walter received her MD from Georgetown University in Washington, DC. She stayed at Georgetown for her internship in Internal Medicine and then moved to New York City to complete her residency in Neurology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She went on to pursue a Clinical Neurophysiology Fellowship at Rush University in Chicago, IL, training in both EEG and EMG. Due to her particular interest in Epilepsy she went on to become the first Epilepsy Fellow at Rush University. Dr. Walter provides clinical care to general neurology patients as well as patients with epilepsy and enjoys teaching residents and medical students. She also has a particular interest in dietary treatments for epilepsy and clinical research.

  • Jack Tzu-Chieh Wang

    Jack Tzu-Chieh Wang

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My primary research focus is in understanding the molecular mechanisms of axonal degeneration and subsequent failure of axonal regeneration in the CNS. I have identified a critical cellular pathway mediating axonal degeneration following neurological injuries. Modulating this pathway presents a novel therapeutic target to protect vulnerable nerve fibers and enhance functional recovery in a multitude of CNS diseases.

  • Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My projects focus on clinical research in newborns with, or at risk, for brain injury. I use EEG in at-risk neonates to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of risk factors that may lead to worse outcomes. I am particularly interested in neonatal seizures and how they may exacerbate perinatal brain injury with a goal to identify treatments that might protect the vulnerable brain. I am also interested in EEG in other pediatric populations, as well as medical ethics and global health.

  • Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    D. H. Chen Professor II

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Use of genetic and molecular tools to dissect immune and inflammatory pathways in Alzheimer's and neurodegeneration.

  • Yanmin Yang

    Yanmin Yang

    Associate Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Elucidate biological functions of cytoskeletal associated proteins in neurons. Define the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in null mice.

  • Jerome Yesavage

    Jerome Yesavage

    Jared and Mae Tinklenberg Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study cognitive processes and aging in our research center. Studies range from molecular biology to neuropsychology of cognitive processes.

  • Kyan Younes, MD

    Kyan Younes, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Younes is a fellowship-trained, board-certified neurologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His areas of expertise include the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer?s disease, frontotemporal dementia, primary progressive aphasia, Lewy body dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus and cognitive and behavioral impairments. For each patient, Dr. Younes develops a personalized plan of care. A plan may include his close collaboration with experts from psychiatry, nursing, pharmacy, genetic counseling, and other specialties. His goal is to ensure that each patient receives care that is both comprehensive and compassionate.

    To help lead advances and innovations in his field, Dr. Younes conducts extensive research. He is studying the clinical, neuropsychological, socioemotional, genetic, and pathological features when a patient experiences degeneration of the right anterior temporal lobe area of the brain. This disorder can affect a person?s ability to process emotions and person-specific knowledge.

    He also is researching how multimodal brain imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) combined with machine learning can help improve the detection of neurodegenerative diseases. In other research, he has participated in clinical trials of new drug therapies for Alzheimer?s disease.

    Dr. Younes has presented research findings at meetings of the American Neurological Association, American Academy of Neurology, and American Psychiatric Association. Topics have included predictors of cognitive performance in dementia.

    He has co-authored research articles published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, Journal of Neuroimaging, and elsewhere. Subjects of these articles have included guidelines for diagnosing the effects of right anterior temporal lobe degeneration on behavior, treatment for symptoms of encephalitis, and the impact of mild traumatic brain injury on healthy older adults.

    Dr. Younes has written chapters on frontotemporal dementia for Psychiatric Clinics as well as the epilepsy, coma, acute ischemic stroke, meningitis and encephalitis chapters for the textbook The Little Black Book of Neurology.

    He is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, American Neurological Association, Alzheimer?s Association, and International Society for Frontotemporal Dementias.

  • Fanglin Zhang, MD

    Fanglin Zhang, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Zhang is a board-certified neurologist, in both neurology and clinical neurophysiology. She serves as a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Zhang excels at the diagnosis and treatment of complicated neurological diseases and her clinical interests are broad, including intractable epilepsy and stroke urgent care.

    With each patient, Dr. Zhang forms a strong alliance focused on overcoming neurological disease and improving quality of life. She practices a patient-centered and evidence-based medicine.

    Dr. Zhang and her colleagues led the Stanford Health Care - ValleyCare Neurology & Neurological Sciences Department response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Efforts focused on the safety of patients and staff and minimizing disruptions to urgent and essential clinical services, such as stroke care.

    Her COVID-19 response efforts also focused on fulfilling Stanford Health Care?s commitment to professional education and training. She enjoys training future neurologists. She has worked to ensure that Stanford Health Care medical students and residents to maintain momentum on their journey to becoming the neurology specialists of tomorrow.

    In addition to delivering clinical care for a wide range of neurological conditions, Dr. Zhang enjoys conducting cutting-edge clinical research. Her work has been published in numerous peer-reviewed journals, such as Neurological Sciences, Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, Neuroimage, Glia, Immunology, the Journal of Psychiatric Practice, Journal of Neuroimmunology, etc. Her current research interest includes clinical trials and a large cohort study of the impact of seizures on stroke outcomes.

    Among her many honors, Dr. Zhang has won a grant award from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Dr. Zhang shows a great enthusiasm in public welfare. She has earned recognition for volunteering her time and expertise at family health centers, hospitals, and schools.

  • Niushen Zhang

    Niushen Zhang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Niushen Zhang specializes in the treatment of headache and facial pain. Dr. Zhang has a special interest in complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of headaches and facial pain. She is the Director of the Headache Fellowship Program at Stanford.

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