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School of Medicine


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  • Hoda S. Abdel Magid

    Hoda S. Abdel Magid

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Health Research & Policy

    Bio My research is focused on understanding how place affects health.

    To understand why this is both interesting and important you need to know:

    (1) Place affects health. Where individuals live, work, go to school shapes their individual health.
    (2) Social determinants of health (e.g. income, employment) affect chronic disease behaviors. These include the ability to exercise, access nutritious food, receive mental health care.
    (3) Social determinants of health affect chronic disease outcomes (e.g. cardiovascular disease, cancer, or obesity).
    (4) Socially marginalized populations including individuals of low socioeconomic status and racially marginalized communities have the highest risk for many chronic disease behaviors and outcomes. This disproportionate risk is largely due to the contextual health influences of the physical and social environment.

    Methodologically, I am currently working to develop a specific epidemiologic framework for utilizing electronic health records, survey, and geographic data with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial methods to reduce health disparities among socially marginalized populations. Merging clinical data with data on social determinants of health in a spatial epidemiology framework effectively allows us to ask and answer questions about how place affects health.

  • Jacqueline Ferguson

    Jacqueline Ferguson

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Epidemiology

    Bio Dr. Jacqueline Ferguson is a postdoctoral research fellow working with Dr. David Rehkopf at the Center for Population Health Sciences at Stanford and Dr. Donna Zulman through the Big Data-Scientist Training Enhancement Program (BD-STEP) at the Palo Alto VA (Veterans Health Administration).

    She specializes in using secondary data sources such as occupational records, insurance claims, and electronic health records to study the relationship between environmental, social exposures and population health. Her research interests are widespread, but all center around methodology to handle time-varying exposures affected by prior exposure and methodology to account for multiple co-exposures or exposure mixtures.

    Jacqueline?s doctoral research examined the impact of specific components of shift work on worker health, and identified night and rotational work as risk factors for hypertension and Type II diabetes. Jacqueline's current research focuses on applying methodology, primarily developed for assessing chemical mixtures in environmental epidemiology, to examine co-occurring social determinants of health. Her research seeks to understand how multiple social determinants of health can simultaneously influence Veteran care and health within the Veterans Health Administration.

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