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School of Medicine


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  • Sarah Eagleman

    Sarah Eagleman

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio For over a decade my research career as a systems neuroscientist has been centered on measuring the brain in different states of consciousness using electrophysiology. Two ways to study conscious transitions empirically are by investigating the brain during sleep and while under anesthesia. I spent my doctoral and early postdoctoral work studying how sleep improves learning and memory at the neural network level. Currently, I study the brain activity associated with anesthetic state transitions to broaden my understanding of the neural dynamics associated with altered conscious states. In fact, the brain shares similar electrophysiological activity patterns during sleep with some anesthetic transitions. With anesthetics, however, one can compare how different anesthetic agents interact with different neuromodulatory systems to cause similar behavioral outcomes (i.e. sedation and unconsciousness).

    My current projects include exploring and evaluating different computational approaches to quantify anesthetic depth using electrophysiology in various anesthetic protocols, identifying perioperative anesthesia risk factors for poor cognitive outcomes, and understanding the influence of anesthesia on neural circuits in patients with epilepsy. A thorough characterization of the brain activity associated with brain state transitions during anesthesia administration is of critical importance to better monitor patients and improve outcomes.

  • John Eaton

    John Eaton

    Charles Lee Powell Foundation Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    Bio Eaton uses experiments and computational simulations to study the flow and heat transfer in complex turbulent flows, especially those relevant to turbomachinery, particle-laden flows, and separated flows, and to develop new techniques for precise control of gas and surface temperature during manufacturing processes.

  • Noelle Hanako Ebel

    Noelle Hanako Ebel

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Current projects include:
    -Alagille syndrome and liver transplantation
    -Liver transplantation in congenital heart disease
    -SARS-CoV-2 in pediatric liver transplant recipients, chronic liver disease and acute liver failure
    -Perioperative management and long term outcomes after liver transplantation for metabolic liver disease
    -Acute liver failure in neonatal lupus

  • Bradley Efron

    Bradley Efron

    Max H. Stein Professor and Professor of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research Interests:
    BOOTSTRAP
    BIOSTATISTICS
    BAYESIAN STATISTICS

  • Elizabeth Egan

    Elizabeth Egan

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Malaria is a parasitic disease transmitted by mosquitos that is a leading cause of childhood mortality globally. Public health efforts to control malaria have historically been hampered by the rapid development of drug resistance. The goal of our research is to understand the molecular determinants of critical host-pathogen interactions in malaria, with a focus on the erythrocyte host cell. Our long-term goal is to develop novel approaches to prevent or treat malaria and improve child health.

  • PeterR. Egbert, MD

    PeterR. Egbert, MD

    Professor of Ophthalmology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Ocular pathology of shaken baby syndrome

  • Lauren E. Eggert, MD

    Lauren E. Eggert, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    Bio Dr. Eggert is a board-certified, fellowship-trained pulmonologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She is an expert in the diagnosis and management of diseases of the airway, with a focus on patients with allergic asthma. She also treats chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), and chronic cough.

    For every patient, Dr. Eggert develops a comprehensive care plan personalized to the individual?s unique needs and lifestyle. Her goals are always to deliver innovative, compassionate care of the highest quality to help each patient achieve the best possible outcome and quality of life.

    Dr. Eggert has extensive research experience. During her fellowship, she worked closely with the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research at Stanford University, where she designed projects to study the use of biologic medications to treat severe asthma, ABPA, and related conditions.

    Dr. Eggert has authored review articles on asthma in adults for BMJ Best Practice. She has developed abstracts related to the prediction of asthma outcomes and switching and combining biologic therapies for asthma. She has presented her work at the American Thoracic Society and the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology annual meetings.

    She is currently involved in several COVID-19 related research projects, including a study of the impact of COVID-19 on outcomes for asthmatic patients and another on the use of pulse oximeters to predict clinical decline after COVID-19 diagnosis.

    Dr. Eggert also practices critical care at Stanford Health Care - ValleyCare and is actively engaged in teaching residents and fellows. She precepts both the Stanford Pulmonary Consult Service and the fellow?s clinics.

  • Shirit Einav

    Shirit Einav

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our basic research program focuses on understanding the roles of virus-host interactions in viral infection and disease pathogenesis via molecular and systems virology single cell approaches. This program is combined with translational efforts to apply this knowledge for the development of broad-spectrum host-centered antiviral approaches to combat emerging viral infections, including dengue, encephalitic alphaviruses, and Ebola, and means to predict disease progression.

  • Alex N. Eischeid, MD

    Alex N. Eischeid, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Eischeid is a board-certified neurologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology, Division of Movement Disorders at Stanford University School of Medicine. He specializes in the management of a wide range of neurological conditions. His focus is on movement disorders, including Parkinson?s disease, atypical parkinsonism, Huntington?s disease, ataxia, dystonia, and tremor. He has advanced training in botulinum toxin injections for dystonia and spasticity. Dr. Eischeid also delivers expertise in deep brain stimulation programming. With each patient, his goal is to safely and effectively relieve symptoms while improving quality of life.

    Dr. Eischeid has been a presenter at the Stanford Alzheimer?s Disease Research Center Neuropathology Case Conference. He also has participated in meetings of the Movement Disorders Society and American Academy of Neurology.

    Scholarship activities of Dr. Eischeid include writing peer-reviewed articles on topics such as the intracellular signaling that enables microglia to increase neurogenesis. His work has appeared in BMC Neuroscience, the Journal of Immunology, PLoS One, and elsewhere.

    Among his honors, Dr. Eischeid received the Resident Fincham Award, given to a graduating neurology resident who best exemplifies the qualities of dedicated patient care and the highest level of collegiality. He was also named Administrative Chief Neurology Resident, an awarded position based on leadership qualities and academic performance. As a senior resident, he earned recognition as the ?Best Resident On-Call.? Dr. Eischeid is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and Movement Disorders Society. He served on the Board of Directors of the Iowa Neurological Association. In his personal time, Dr. Eischeid has provided volunteer medical services at homeless shelters.

  • Katherine Eisen

    Katherine Eisen

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Eisen is a Clinical Assistant Professor and CA Licensed Clinical Psychologist working with the INSPIRE Clinic at Stanford. Her research and clinical interest center on therapeutic interventions that support recovery for individuals living with serious mental illness, in particular for individuals with psychosis. Dr. Eisen received her bachelor?s degree from Cornell University, and her PhD from the University of Connecticut, and completed postdoctoral training at Stanford University. Before coming to the INSPIRE Clinic, Dr. Eisen worked for over 10 years as a psychologist on the acute inpatient units at Stanford Health Care. Dr. Eisen is trained in CBT for psychosis (CBTp) and has worked with colleagues to train therapists, nursing and multidisciplinary staff, medical students, and residents to integrate CBTp informed, recovery-oriented approaches into their work with individuals with psychosis. She provides both individual and group-based cognitive behavioral therapy.

  • Dan Eisenberg, MD

    Dan Eisenberg, MD

    Associate Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Minimally Invasive Surgery
    Metabolic-Bariatric Surgery

  • Ahmed Nagy El Kaffas

    Ahmed Nagy El Kaffas

    Instructor, Radiology

    Bio We develop quantitative imaging methods to characterize the tumor microenvironment, and to subsequently relate these imaging parameters to biomarkers that can be used for cancer surveillance, diagnosis and treatment monitoring/characterization. The focus is on 1) developing new acquisition methods and protocols to enhance quantification, 2) designing new image processing algorithms, analysis parameters and statistical models to quantitatively characterize imaging data, and 3) using advanced AI methods to further refine quantification or classification. While our methods can be used for other imaging modalities, we primarily focus on Ultrasound imaging modes such as contrast, molecular, elastography and spectroscopic ultrasound. Disease focus include liver cancer and liver metastasis, liver fibrosis/cirrhosis, and tumor blood flow characterization.

  • Yasser El-Sayed, Professor

    Yasser El-Sayed, Professor

    Charles B. and Ann L. Johnson Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests High Risk Obstetrics: preterm labor, preeclampsia, medical and surgical complications of pregnancy, prenatal diagnosis and therapy

  • Samer Eldika

    Samer Eldika

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio Dr. Eldika received his medical education at the American University of Beirut. He completed his General Gastroenterology Fellowship at the State University of New York in Buffalo and Advanced Endoscopy Fellowship at the University of Virginia. At Ohio State University, he served as the Director of Interventional Endoscopy and Endoscopic Quality. His time at Ohio State University contributed to the growth and maturity of his experience and skills in interventional endoscopy. During his tenure there, he played a major role in building the program of interventional endoscopy in general, as well as interventional endoscopy for the pediatric age group, and the endoscopic quality program. Over the years, he was involved in training several gastroenterology fellows and interventional endoscopists. He recently joined Stanford University where he continues to practice interventional endoscopy and train fellows.
    He is a board-certified Gastroenterologist with clinical interests in pancreaticobiliary diseases, gastrointestinal neoplasia, and related interventional endoscopic procedures. As an endoscopist, he has extensive experience in performing a variety of interventional endoscopic procedures. These procedures include endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided procedures like fine needle aspiration/biopsy, injections, fiducial placement, pseudocyst drainage/necrosectomy, biliary drainage, gastrojejunostomy, transgastric ERCP, and needle-based confocal endomicroscopy for the evaluation of pancreatic cystic lesions. He also performs endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), endoscopic mucosal resection, enteral and stenting, enteral feeding tube placement, as well as deep enteroscopy.
    His research interest evolves around interventional endoscopy, more specifically in the evaluation of pancreatic cystic lesions. Dr. Eldika has received multiple awards in his career, his most recent one being the ?Reviewer Award, April 2020,? for his superior contributions to the journal of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, both through completing high numbers of reviews and for submitting the highest quality of work.
    Dr. Eldika is a fellow of the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. He is a member of the American Gastroenterological Association, American College of Gastroenterology, and American Pancreatic Association.
    When not working Dr. Eldika enjoys reading, listening to music, watching sports and walking in nature.

  • Ekene Enemchukwu

    Ekene Enemchukwu

    Assistant Professor of Urology and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Urogynecology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Refractory overactive bladder in elderly and frail patient populations, detrusor underactivity, quality of life, patient outcomes, quality improvement, patient satisfaction, and shared decision making

  • Lawrence Eng

    Lawrence Eng

    Professor (Research) of Pathology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Astrocytes make up a substantial proportion of the central nervous system (CNS) and participate in a variety of important physiologic and pathologic processes. They are characterized by vigorous response to diverse neurologic insults.

  • Michelle Yixiao Engle, MD

    Michelle Yixiao Engle, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Dr. Michelle Engle grew up in Virginia, though she has also lived in China and Canada. She moved to California for medical training and quickly grew attached to the Bay Area. She is board-certified in family medicine and palliative medicine, providing holistic care to patients of all ages.

    Her hobbies include barre, board games, escape rooms, cooking, and rock climbing.

  • Edgar Engleman

    Edgar Engleman

    Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dendritic cells, macrophages, NK cells and T cells; functional proteins and genes; immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer, autoimmune disease, neurodegenerative disease and metabolic disease.

  • Daniel Bruce Ennis

    Daniel Bruce Ennis

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Veterans Affairs)

    Bio Daniel Ennis (Ph.D.) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Radiology. As an MRI scientist for nearly twenty years, he has worked to develop advanced translational cardiovascular MRI methods for quantitatively assessing structure, function, flow, and remodeling in both adult and pediatric populations. He began his research career as a Ph.D. student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University during which time he formed an active collaboration with investigators in the Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH/NHLBI). Thereafter, he joined the Departments of Radiological Sciences and Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University as a post doc and began to establish an independent research program with an NIH K99/R00 award focused on ?Myocardial Structure, Function, and Remodeling in Mitral Regurgitation.? For ten years he led a group of clinicians and scientists at UCLA working to develop and evaluate advanced cardiovascular MRI exams as PI of several NIH funded studies. In 2018 he returned to Stanford Radiology and the Radiological Sciences Lab to bolster programs in cardiovascular MRI. He is also the Director of Radiology Research for the Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System where he oversees a growing radiology research program.

  • Gregory Enns

    Gregory Enns

    Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests mitochondrial genomics, lysosomal disorders, tandem-mass spectrometry newborn screening, and inborn errors of metabolism presentations and natural history

  • Benjamin Erickson, MD, MHS

    Benjamin Erickson, MD, MHS

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Surgical instrument & medical device design

    Reconstructive techniques & outcomes

    Orbital tumors & trauma

    Instruments in production:
    - Erickson-Lee Pigtail Cannula (E2517, E2517), Bausch & Lomb/Storz
    - Erickson-Lee Ptosis Clamp (E2515), Bausch & Lomb/Storz

  • Mo Esfahanian, MD D. ABA, FAAP

    Mo Esfahanian, MD D. ABA, FAAP

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My current interests include the suprazygomatic maxillary nerve block and its role in enhanced recovery after cleft palate surgery and the development of a high-fidelity ultrasound phantom model to teach this regional anesthesia technique. I am also investigating the role of erector spinae plane blockade in the post-operative recovery of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion.

  • Neir Eshel, MD, PhD

    Neir Eshel, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Eshel (he/him/his) is a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His clinical focus is the full-spectrum mental health care of sexual and gender minorities, with particular interest in depression, anxiety, and the complex effects of trauma in this population. He works in collaboration with other primary care and mental health providers at the new Stanford LGBTQ+ program.

    His research interests include the use of optogenetic, electrophysiological, neuroimaging, and behavioral approaches to probe the neural circuits of reward processing, decision making, and social behavior. He recently won multi-year grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, and Simons Foundation to study the neural circuits of frustration and aggression.

    Dr. Eshel has published articles on topics such as the role of dopamine in learning, the neuroscience of irritability, LGBTQ health, reward and punishment processing in depression, behavioral predictors of substance use among adolescents, and the mechanism of transcranial magnetic stimulation. His work has appeared in Nature, Science, Nature Neuroscience, Annual Review of Neuroscience, JAMA, JAMA Psychiatry, Neuropsychopharmacology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Journal of Neuroscience. He is also the author of the book Learning: The Science Inside, a publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

    He has delivered presentations on anger expression in patients with PTSD, the neural circuitry of learning, dopamine prediction errors, and LGBTQ-related topics at meetings of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, Society of Biological Psychiatry, and Association of American Medical Colleges, among others. He is also an associate editor of the Journal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health, and an ad-hoc reviewer for numerous publications including Science, JAMA Psychiatry, Biological Psychiatry, and Current Biology.


    Dr. Eshel has won honors for his scholarship and advocacy, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Outstanding Resident Award from the National Institute of Mental Health, the Science and SciLifeLab Grand Prize for Young Scientists, and the National LGBT Health Achievement Award.

    He is a member of the American Psychiatric Association, Society of Biological Psychiatry, Association of Gay & Lesbian Psychiatrists, Society for Neuroscience, and other professional associations. He is also an advocate for LGBTQ rights, recently serving as the LGBTQ Chair of the Stanford Graduate Medical Education Diversity Committee.

    Prior to Stanford, Dr. Eshel trained and conducted research at the National Institutes of Health, Princeton University, the World Health Organization, University College London, and Harvard University.

  • Flint Espil

    Flint Espil

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Flint Espil researches the etiology and treatment of tic disorders (including Tourette?s), Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and body-focused repetitive behaviors. He is interested in how psychosocial factors, the environment, and underlying brain circuitry influence treatment outcomes among individuals seeking treatment. Dr. Espil is currently collaborating with the Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research and the Brain Stimulation Lab to explore novel imaging techniques (e.g., functional near-infrared spectroscopy) and neuromodulation approaches (e.g., transcranial magnetic stimulation, deep brain stimulation) to improve our understanding of these disorders. He is also exploring ways to adapt and implement evidence-based mental health approaches in community settings. He is currently collaborating with community-based organizations in East Palo Alto to improve access to care for youth in school settings.

  • Carlos O. Esquivel, M.D., Ph.D.,FACS

    Carlos O. Esquivel, M.D., Ph.D.,FACS

    Arnold and Barbara Silverman Professor in Pediatric Transplantation in the School of Medicine, Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation) and of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1) Induction of immunotolerance
    2) Rejection of liver and intestinal transplantation.
    3) Clinical outcomes of children with unresectable liver tumors.

  • Micaela Esquivel, MD

    Micaela Esquivel, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - General Surgery

    Bio Dr. Esquivel is a board-certified, fellowship-trained bariatric and minimally invasive surgeon. She is a clinical assistant professor of surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. She is also the director of community engagement and outreach for the Stanford Department of Surgery.

    Specialties of Dr. Esquivel include foregut surgery and bariatric surgery. She performs robotic surgery as well as therapeutic surgical endoscopy.

    She is actively building the Bariatric Endoscopy Program of Stanford Health Care. Her goal is to offer procedures such as endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty and endoscopic suturing of the gastric pouch and outlet after gastric bypass for patients experiencing weight regain.

    Dr. Esquivel has a great interest in helping everyone access the care they need. She values work that minimizes disparities and promotes health equity. As the director of community engagement and outreach for the Stanford Department of Surgery, she is committed to working directly with community organizations to ensure long-term changes are sustained. Dr. Esquivel?s role also allows her to form long-term partnerships and collaborate to implement and oversee programs for underserved populations.
    Research interests of Dr. Esquivel range from the global, like minimum rates of surgery to support desirable outcomes, to the more specific, such as weight loss before bariatric surgery. She has studied access to surgical care in California, as well as access to care in Zambia, Guatemala, and other countries.

    Dr. Esquivel has made numerous presentations on surgical care access, among other topics, at conferences including the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress, Academic Surgical Congress, and the UK?s Royal Society of Medicine. In addition, she has written more than two dozen articles on topics such as surgical outcomes, weight loss before bariatric surgery, and global access to surgical services. Her work has appeared in JAMA, the World Journal of Surgery, Journal of Surgical Research, Journal of Surgical Education, Lancet, and elsewhere.

    Among her many honors, Dr. Esquivel has won the prestigious Samuel L. Kountz Humanitarian Award, awarded to a Stanford resident distinguished by professionalism, compassion, and respect for the dignity of others?attributes shared by the late Dr. Kountz, a trailblazing surgeon and the first African American surgical resident at Stanford. Dr. Esquivel also won the Resident Research Award of the Year in Stanford General Surgery and the Post-Doctoral Fellowship Award from Stanford?s Hispanic Center for Excellence.

    In addition to serving as the director of community engagement and outreach, Dr. Esquivel directs the ?Service Through Surgery: Surgeons with an Impact? course in the Stanford University School of Medicine and is the co-chair of the Stanford Department of Surgery Diversity Cabinet.

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