ERROR! No headcode.htm file found.

Bio

Stanford Advisors


Publications

All Publications


  • The role of metabolism in directed differentiation versus trans-differentiation of cardiomyocytes. Seminars in cell & developmental biology Jahng, J. W., Zhang, M., Wu, J. C. 2021

    Abstract

    The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and identification of transcription factors for cardiac reprogramming have raised hope to cure heart disease, the leading cause of death in the world. Our knowledge in heart development and molecular barriers of cardiac reprogramming is advancing, but many hurdles are yet to be overcome for clinical translation. Importantly, we lack a full understanding of molecular mechanisms governing cell fate conversion toward cardiomyocytes. In this review, we will discuss the role of metabolism in directed differentiation versus trans-differentiation of cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes exhibit a unique metabolic feature distinct from PSCs and cardiac fibroblasts, and there are multiple overlapping molecular mechanisms underlying metabolic reprogramming during cardiomyogenesis. We will discuss key metabolic changes occurring during cardiomyocytes differentiation from PSCs and cardiac fibroblasts, and the potential role of metabolic reprogramming in the enhancement strategies for cardiomyogenesis. Only when such details are discovered will more effective strategies to enhance the de novo production of cardiomyocytes be possible.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.semcdb.2021.05.018

    View details for PubMedID 34074592

  • Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Screening Platform for Drug-Induced Vascular Toxicity FRONTIERS IN PHARMACOLOGY Tu, C., Cunningham, N. J., Zhang, M., Wu, J. C. 2021; 12
  • Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Screening Platform for Drug-Induced Vascular Toxicity. Frontiers in pharmacology Tu, C. n., Cunningham, N. J., Zhang, M. n., Wu, J. C. 2021; 12: 613837

    Abstract

    Evaluation of potential vascular injury is an essential part of the safety study during pharmaceutical development. Vascular liability issues are important causes of drug termination during preclinical investigations. Currently, preclinical assessment of vascular toxicity primarily relies on the use of animal models. However, accumulating evidence indicates a significant discrepancy between animal toxicity and human toxicity, casting doubt on the clinical relevance of animal models for such safety studies. While the causes of this discrepancy are expected to be multifactorial, species differences are likely a key factor. Consequently, a human-based model is a desirable solution to this problem, which has been made possible by the advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In particular, recent advances in the field now allow the efficient generation of a variety of vascular cells (e.g., endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and pericytes) from iPSCs. Using these cells, different vascular models have been established, ranging from simple 2D cultures to highly sophisticated vascular organoids and microfluidic devices. Toxicity testing using these models can recapitulate key aspects of vascular pathology on molecular (e.g., secretion of proinflammatory cytokines), cellular (e.g., cell apoptosis), and in some cases, tissue (e.g., endothelium barrier dysfunction) levels. These encouraging data provide the rationale for continuing efforts in the exploration, optimization, and validation of the iPSC technology in vascular toxicology.

    View details for DOI 10.3389/fphar.2021.613837

    View details for PubMedID 33790786

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC8006367

Stanford Medicine Resources: