ERROR! No headcode.htm file found.

School of Medicine


Showing 21-30 of 66 Results

  • Bertha Chen, MD

    Bertha Chen, MD

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Gynecology - Urogynecology) and, by courtesy, of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Chen?s research examines the molecular causes of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor dysfunction. Recognizing that urinary incontinence linked to demise of smooth muscle sphincter function, she is investigating the potential use of stem cell regeneration to restore muscle capacity.

  • James K. Chen

    James K. Chen

    Jauch Professor and Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology, of Developmental Biology and of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory combines chemistry and developmental biology to investigate the molecular events that regulate embryonic patterning, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. We are currently using genetic and small-molecule approaches to study the molecular mechanisms of Hedgehog signaling, and we are developing chemical technologies to perturb and observe the genetic programs that underlie vertebrate development.

  • Lu Chen

    Lu Chen

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests What distinguishes us humans from other animals is our ability to undergo complex behavior. The synapses are the structural connection between neurons that mediates the communication between neurons, which underlies our various cognitive function. My research program aims to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie synapse function during behavior in the developing and mature brain, and how synapse function is altered during mental retardation.

  • Alan G. Cheng

    Alan G. Cheng

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Active Wnt signaling maintains somatic stem cells in many organ systems. Using Wnt target genes as markers, we have characterized distinct cell populations with stem cell behavior in the inner ear, an organ thought to be terminally differentiated. Ongoing work focuses on delineating the developing significance of these putative stem/progenitor cells and their behavior after damage.

  • Thomas L. Cherpes, DVM, MD

    Thomas L. Cherpes, DVM, MD

    Assistant Professor, Comparative Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Directs an infectious disease laboratory that performs basic, translational, and clinical research. Laboratory has particular focus on:
    1) relationship between exogenous sex steroids on susceptibility to microbial pathogens
    2) role of Type 2 immunity in Chlamydia infection
    3) developing cellular immunotherapies to combat infectious disease and cancer

  • Sundari Chetty

    Sundari Chetty

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Chetty lab is interested in understanding the mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. In particular, our group has been investigating the mechanisms underlying brain overgrowth or undergrowth in these disorders using human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technology. Changes in brain size often precede clinical symptoms, suggesting that understanding the underlying mechanisms regulating brain overgrowth or undergrowth could provide a window of opportunity for intervention or mitigation of symptoms.

    Using hiPSCs from idiopathic patients as well as those with known genetic variations, we generate iPSC-derived cortical neural and oligodendroglial cells to investigate changes at the cellular, functional, and mechanistic levels using a broad range of techniques from RNA sequencing, genome editing, to functional assays in in vitro and in vivo models. The overarching goal of our research program is to identify novel therapeutic targets based on these mechanistic insights.

  • Christina F. Chick

    Christina F. Chick

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research examines the mechanistic contributions of sleep, cognition and affect to the onset and course of psychiatric disorders across the lifespan. I am particularly interested in adolescence as a period during which changes in circadian rhythm, sleep architecture, and sleep behavior co-occur with neuroendocrine development, psychosocial changes, and the onset of many psychiatric disorders. Given that sleep is a highly treatable target, increasing our understanding of the specific contributions of sleep to psychiatric symptom onset may facilitate the development of targeted interventions to mitigate the course of illness.

Stanford Medicine Resources: