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School of Medicine


Showing 101-120 of 146 Results

  • Benjamin Erickson, MD, MHS

    Benjamin Erickson, MD, MHS

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Surgical instrument & medical device design

    Reconstructive techniques & outcomes

    Orbital tumors & trauma

    Instruments in production:
    - Erickson-Lee Pigtail Cannula (E2517, E2517), Bausch & Lomb/Storz
    - Erickson-Lee Ptosis Clamp (E2515), Bausch & Lomb/Storz

  • Koray Ertan

    Koray Ertan

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Radiological Sciences Laboratory

    Bio Koray Ertan received his BSc degree in the Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering at Bilkent University, Turkey. He completed his PhD in the same department under the supervision of Prof. Ergin Atalar. During his PhD, he worked as a researcher at National Magnetic Resonance Research Center (UMRAM) of Turkey. His thesis study is the development of novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies such as gradient array systems for increasing diagnostic quality of the MR images, reducing the specific absorption rate and scan time.

    He joined Prof. Brian Rutt's group as a postdoctoral researcher in April 2019. Later, he was also affilated as a MINDED postdoctoral fellow in June 2019. As part of the MINDED program, his current research focuses on a system for modulating the permeability of the blood brain barrier using focused radio frequency heating generated from ultra-high field MRI transmit coils for enhanced treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders with nanomedicines. Additionally, his research interest mostly includes MRI technolgies such as RF pulse design, gradient systems, field monitoring, multi-coil gradient and shim arrays.

  • Graham Erwin

    Graham Erwin

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Genetics

    Bio Graham Erwin, Ph.D., is a Stanford Cancer Institute Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Genetics at Stanford University. He is a molecular, chemical, and genome biologist elucidating the functional role of repetitive DNA sequences. This work is guiding the design of new therapeutics and diagnostics for human disease. Graham is currently supported by an NIH Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00). He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin?Madison, where he was a co-inventor of synthetic transcription factors to treat devastating neurodegenerative diseases. The resulting patents formed the basis of Design Therapeutics (San Diego, California). He has published first-author papers in high-impact journals including PNAS and Science. Graham is an advocate for first-generation college students and for programs that support mental health and psychological thriving on college campuses. He is a guest lecturer in Wellness Education at Stanford.

  • Mo Esfahanian, MD D. ABA, FAAP

    Mo Esfahanian, MD D. ABA, FAAP

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My current interests include the suprazygomatic maxillary nerve block and its role in enhanced recovery after cleft palate surgery and the development of a high-fidelity ultrasound phantom model to teach this regional anesthesia technique. I am also investigating the role of erector spinae plane blockade in the post-operative recovery of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion.

  • Rahim Esfandyarpour

    Rahim Esfandyarpour

    Research Engineer, Biochemistry - Genome Center

    Bio Rahim Esfandyarpour received his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 2010 and 2014 respectively.

  • Neir Eshel, MD, PhD

    Neir Eshel, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Eshel (he/him/his) is a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His clinical focus is the full-spectrum mental health care of sexual and gender minorities, with particular interest in depression, anxiety, and the complex effects of trauma in this population. He works in collaboration with other primary care and mental health providers at the new Stanford LGBTQ+ program.

    His research interests include the use of optogenetic, electrophysiological, neuroimaging, and behavioral approaches to probe the neural circuits of reward processing, decision making, and social behavior. He recently won multi-year grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, and Simons Foundation to study the neural circuits of frustration and aggression.

    Dr. Eshel has published articles on topics such as the role of dopamine in learning, the neuroscience of irritability, LGBTQ health, reward and punishment processing in depression, behavioral predictors of substance use among adolescents, and the mechanism of transcranial magnetic stimulation. His work has appeared in Nature, Science, Nature Neuroscience, Annual Review of Neuroscience, JAMA, JAMA Psychiatry, Neuropsychopharmacology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Journal of Neuroscience. He is also the author of the book Learning: The Science Inside, a publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

    He has delivered presentations on anger expression in patients with PTSD, the neural circuitry of learning, dopamine prediction errors, and LGBTQ-related topics at meetings of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, Society of Biological Psychiatry, and Association of American Medical Colleges, among others. He is also an associate editor of the Journal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health, and an ad-hoc reviewer for numerous publications including Science, JAMA Psychiatry, Biological Psychiatry, and Current Biology.


    Dr. Eshel has won honors for his scholarship and advocacy, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Outstanding Resident Award from the National Institute of Mental Health, the Science and SciLifeLab Grand Prize for Young Scientists, and the National LGBT Health Achievement Award.

    He is a member of the American Psychiatric Association, Society of Biological Psychiatry, Association of Gay & Lesbian Psychiatrists, Society for Neuroscience, and other professional associations. He is also an advocate for LGBTQ rights, recently serving as the LGBTQ Chair of the Stanford Graduate Medical Education Diversity Committee.

    Prior to Stanford, Dr. Eshel trained and conducted research at the National Institutes of Health, Princeton University, the World Health Organization, University College London, and Harvard University.

  • Flint Espil

    Flint Espil

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Flint Espil researches the etiology and treatment of tic disorders (including Tourette?s), Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and body-focused repetitive behaviors. He is interested in how psychosocial factors, the environment, and underlying brain circuitry influence treatment outcomes among individuals seeking treatment. Dr. Espil is currently collaborating with the Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research and the Brain Stimulation Lab to explore novel imaging techniques (e.g., functional near-infrared spectroscopy) and neuromodulation approaches (e.g., transcranial magnetic stimulation, deep brain stimulation) to improve our understanding of these disorders. He is also exploring ways to adapt and implement evidence-based mental health approaches in community settings. He is currently collaborating with community-based organizations in East Palo Alto to improve access to care for youth in school settings.

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