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School of Medicine


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  • Dr Husein Hadeiba

    Dr Husein Hadeiba

    Affiliate, Pathology VA Faculty PTAs

    Bio My research interests center on understanding how dendritic cells (DCs) regulate the immune response. Specifically we are interested in the role of DC trafficking in inflammation and in the maintenance of immune homeostasis and tolerance. To understand these processes, we are examining the mechanisms of DC homing to sites of immune tolerance such as (i) the thymus-the site of central tolerance, and (ii) the gut mucosa-where immune responses to commensal and ingested antigens (Ags) are shut down. We are also interested in understanding how microenvironmental tissue factors influence DC development and their ability to imprint unique homing properties on T cells. DCs are unique messenger white blood cells of the mammalian immune system. They function as specialized antigen-presenting cells (APCs), whose main function is to process and transport Ags and microenvironmental signals from the tissues to the draining lymph nodes for presentation to T cells. In the last decade, a large number of DC subsets have been characterized in part defined by their expression of unique trafficking and adhesion receptors, and migratory properties. We therefore would like to understand how these trafficking and adhesion receptors define their function and phenotype and how they are regulated by the tissue microenvironment, with the hope of targeting unique DC subsets to suppress chronic inflammation or to improve anti-tumor responses in immunotherapy.

  • Felix J. Hartmann

    Felix J. Hartmann

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Pathology

    Bio Dr. Hartmann received a B.Sc. and M.Sc. in Molecular Biotechnology from the University of Heidelberg, Germany and his PhD from the University of Zurich, Switzerland for his research on T cell effector functions in human autoimmune diseases. In 2017, he joined Stanford University as a postdoctoral fellow to study cancer immunology using highly multiplexed tissue imaging technologies. His research combines novel single-cell and imaging proteomic technologies with novel biological assays to reveal interactions of immune cells with their local environment and how this impacts clinical outcome in human cancer. Most recently, he has developed a novel approach that enables analysis of cellular metabolism in individual cells and with spatial resolution.

    Dr. Hartmann has been the recipient of a Van Riemsdijk PhD Fellowship, a Swiss National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Scholarship (2016), a Novartis Foundation for biomedical research Postdoctoral Fellowship and a European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) LongTerm Postdoctoral Fellowship. He has received numerous awards, including a Distinction Award for his Ph.D. Thesis (2016), the Pfizer Research Award (2016), and a Young Investigator Award from the American Association of Immunologists (2019). In 2020, he has received a Young Investigator Grant from the Helmholtz Association.

  • Florette K. Gray Hazard

    Florette K. Gray Hazard

    Associate Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My scholarly pursuits are primarily focused on the study of death and disease in the pediatric population. It is through this work that I am able to explore fundamental concepts of neoplasia, such as histogenesis and mutagenesis, while utilizing a variety of investigational techniques.

  • Laurin Heinrich

    Laurin Heinrich

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Pathology

    Bio Laurin Heinrich, Ph.D. is a dedicated Postdoctoral Research Fellow specialized in neuroscience and neurophysiology. Driven by her passion to improve therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, she seeks to uncover and understand the mechanisms underlying severe diseases such as Parkinson's. She thereby incorporates an interdisciplinary approach combining human iPSC modeling and CRISPR screening with molecular biological and novel electrophysiological techniques.
    During a 6 months postdoctoral fellowship at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Laurin contributed to the development of a functional cortico-striato-nigral neuronal microcircuit using human-derived iPSC (2020). She completed her doctoral thesis in the lab of Prof. Dr. Carsten Duch at the Institute of Developmental Biology and Neurobiology (IDN) at the Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz (2016-2019), where she investigated the neuronal function of ?2? calcium channel subunits. She received her Master of Science with a major in Neurobiology from Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz (2013-2015) and a Bachelor?s degree from the Technical University Kaiserslautern (2010-2013).

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