ERROR! No headcode.htm file found.

School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 261 Results

  • Saverio La Francesca

    Saverio La Francesca

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Clinical Focus
    -Heart Transplantation.
    -Lung Transplantation
    -Organ Perfusion and Preservation.
    -Regenerative Medicine

    Academic Appointments
    -Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery. Current
    -Asst. Professor of Surgery. Ohio State University. Wexner Medical Center. Columbus-Ohio. 2019 ? 2020
    -Staff - Department of Cardiovascular Surgery DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center. Houston, Texas. 2010-2013
    -Attending Surgeon - Department of Cardiopulmonary Transplantation. Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke?s Episcopal Hospital. Houston, Texas. 2018- 2010

    Industry Experience
    -President and Chief Medical Officer, Mar 2017 to Oct 2017 Biostage, Inc. (NASDAQ: BSTG)
    -Executive Vice-President and Chief Medical Officer, Aug 2015 to Mar 2017 Biostage, Inc. (NASDAQ: BSTG)
    -Chief Medical Officer, Apr 2014 to Jul 2015 Biostage, Inc. (NASDAQ: BSTG) (formerly Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology,

  • Angelle Desiree LaBeaud

    Angelle Desiree LaBeaud

    Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases), Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Arthropod-borne viruses are emerging and re-emerging infections that are spreading throughout the world. Our laboratory investigates the epidemiology of arboviral infections, focusing on the burden of disease and the long-term complications on human health. In particular, Dr. LaBeaud investigates dengue, chikungunya, and Rift Valley fever viruses in Kenya, where outbreaks cause fever, arthritis, retinitis, encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fever. Our main research questions focus on the risk factors for arboviral infections, the development of diagnostic tests that can be administered in the field to quickly determine what kind of arboviral infection a person has, and the genetic and immunologic investigation of why different people respond differently to the same infection. Our long-term goals are to contribute to a deeper understanding of arboviral infections and their long-term health consequences and to optimize control strategies to prevent these emerging infections. Our laboratory also investigates the effects of antenatal and postnatal parasitic infections on vaccine responses, growth, and development of Kenyan children.

    My lab at Stanford supports the field work that is ongoing in Kenya, but we also have several projects that are based locally. We strive to improve diagnostics of arboviral infections and are using Luminex technology to build a new screening assay. We also have created a Luminex based platform to assess vaccine responses against multiple pathogens.

  • Norman J. Lacayo, MD

    Norman J. Lacayo, MD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology and Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Phase I drug studies for refractory and relapsed leukemia; genomic studies, biologic risk-stratification and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia; prediction or induction response and risk of relapse using phosphoproteomics in childhood AML; novel MRD techniques in childhood ALL.

  • Uri Ladabaum

    Uri Ladabaum

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Gastrointestinal cancer prevention and risk management. Risk stratification. Cost-effectiveness analysis. Health services research.

  • Amy Ladd, MD

    Amy Ladd, MD

    Elsbach-Richards Professor of Surgery and Professor, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology) and of Surgery (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research Interests
    1. The kinematics and forces associated with thumb carpometcarpal (CMC) function and pathology
    2. The anatomy, microstructure, and immunofluorescent characteristics of the thumb CMC joint
    3. Pathomechaniics of CMC arthritis: biomechanical wear, injury, genetic, and environmental causes
    4. Archiving, vitalizing, and innovating medical and surgical knowledge, most recently with innovative iBook monographs

  • Richard Lafayette

    Richard Lafayette

    Professor of Medicine (Nephrology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are continuing to grow a glomerulonephritis cohort study, including immunologic characterization. We have completed interventional studies of preeclampsia exploring the nitric oxide, endothelin system and effects on glomerular function and morphometry. We continue to recruit patients for treatment and observational studies of glomerular disease, including FSGS, membranous and particularly IgA nephropathy. We also are actively studying renal disease in systemic amyloidosis.

  • Teresa LaFromboise

    Teresa LaFromboise

    Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Bicultural competence and resilience in ethnic minority adolescent development. Particularly, the influence of enculturation and acculturation experiences on adolescent development. Cultural considerations in individual, school and community-based psychological interventions with adolescents and emerging adults.

  • Sheila Lahijani, MD

    Sheila Lahijani, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio After graduating from Brown Medical School, Dr. Lahijani completed the Combined Internal Medicine/Psychiatry Residency Program at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. She then served as a physician in the areas of primary care and triple diagnosis (addiction, HIV, mental health). Thereafter, Dr. Lahijani completed the Psychosomatic Medicine Fellowship at the Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University where she worked at the Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center. During her fellowship, she also served as a psychiatric oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Lahijani is trained in and administers several psychotherapeutic modalities, including Meaning Centered Psychotherapy and Dignity Therapy.

    Dr. Lahijani joined the faculty of Stanford University School of Medicine in 2015 as a Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Since her initial appointment, Dr. Lahijani has served as the lead psychiatric oncologist at the Stanford Cancer Center where she provides psychiatric consultation services to patients with cancer and collaborates closely with her hematology and oncology colleagues to deliver comprehensive cancer care.

    In 2019, she was appointed as the Medical Director of the Stanford Cancer Center Psychosocial Oncology Program where she works in Stanford Cancer Center leadership and oversees the development and operationalization of psychiatric consultation for patients with cancer. Dr. Lahijani also attends on the medical/surgical units, ICUs and in the emergency department at Stanford Hospital and Clinics to provide care for patients with complex medical and psychiatric diagnoses and to teach psychiatry, internal medicine, and neurology trainees.

    As Faculty of the Advancing Communication Excellence at Stanford, Dr. Lahijani leads foundational workshops for faculty and staff to advance communication skills with patients, families, and their colleagues. She is committed to developing and contributing to efforts that focus on relationship centered skills and provider wellness.

    Her clinical and scholarly interests include the interface of medicine and psychiatry, pharmacology, psycho-oncology, collaborative care models, psychotherapy for the medically ill, interdisciplinary medical education, teaching, and writing.

  • Tze Leung Lai

    Tze Leung Lai

    Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests include clinical trial design, cancer biostatistics, survival analysis, adaptation and sequential experimentation, change-point detection and segmentation, stochastic optimization, time series and inference on stochastic processes, hidden Markov models and genomic applications.

  • David D. Laitin

    David D. Laitin

    James T. Watkins IV and Elise V. Watkins Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    Bio David D. Laitin is the James T. Watkins IV and Elise V. Watkins Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. He received his BA from Swarthmore College, and then served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Somalia and Grenada, where he became national tennis champion in 1970. Back in the US, he received his Ph.D. in political science from UC Berkeley, working under the direction of Ernst Haas and Hanna Pitkin.

    He has taught at three great universities: UCSD (1975-87), the University of Chicago (1987-1999) and now at Stanford. Over his career, as a student of comparative politics, he has conducted field research in Somalia, Yorubaland (Nigeria), Catalonia (Spain), Estonia, and France, all the time focusing on issues of language and religion, and how these cultural phenomena link nation to state. His books include Politics, Language and Thought: The Somali Experience (1977), Hegemony and Culture: Politics and Religious Change among the Yoruba (1986), Language Repertoires and State Construction in Africa (1992), Identity in Formation: The Russian-Speaking Populations in the Near Abroad (1998); Nations, States and Violence (2007); Why Muslim Integration Fails in Christian-Heritage Societies (2016); and African Politics Since Independence (2019).

    Over the past decade, mostly in collaboration with James Fearon, he has published several papers on ethnicity, ethnic cooperation, the sources of civil war, and on policies that work to settle civil wars. Laitin has also collaborated with Alan Krueger on international terrorism and with Eli Berman on suicide terrorism.

    In 2008-2009, with support from the National Science Foundation, and with a visiting appointment at Sciences-Po Paris, Laitin conducted ethnographic, survey and experimental research on Muslim integration into France, seeking to assess the magnitude of religious discrimination and isolate the mechanisms that sustain it. The initial results from that project were published in the "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences" (2010).

    In 2016, Laitin became co-director of Stanford's Immigration Policy Lab, and has co-authored several papers published in "Science", "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences" and "Nature Human Behavior" that estimate the effects of policy on immigrant integration.

    Laitin has been a recipient of fellowships from the Howard Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Russell Sage Foundation. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. In 2021 Laitin was the recipient of the John Skytte Prize in Political Science from the Johan Skytte Foundation at Uppsala University, Sweden.

  • Rayhan Lal

    Rayhan Lal

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    Bio I grew up in the east bay area and have had type 1 diabetes for 30+ years. I studied electrical engineering and computer science at U.C. Berkeley (Go Bears!) with the hope of applying my knowledge to diabetes technology. The significance of clinical practice became clear to me after my siblings also developed diabetes. I am devoting my life to advancing the care of diabetes in people of all ages.

  • Vinh Lam

    Vinh Lam

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Dr. Vinh Lam is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population health. He earned his MD from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and chose to stay in Los Angeles to complete his family medicine residency training at UCLA. During his training, Dr. Lam developed a strong interest in teaching and medical education through his involvement with resident education and the graduate medical education committee. He also spent 1 year as a resident informaticist where he also became very interested in informatics, medical technology, and innovative solutions to improving patient health outcomes and decreasing physician burnout. Dr. Lam enjoys caring for patients of all ages from pediatrics to geriatrics, performing office-based procedures, and prioritizing preventative care.
    Outside of medicine, Dr. Lam loves to travel with his family, dabbles in photography and videography, and enjoys attempting to recreate meals he has had while traveling with his wife, Becca.

  • Scott R. Lambert, MD

    Scott R. Lambert, MD

    Professor of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research has focused on improving the visual outcomes of children with congenital cataracts. I organized a randomized clinical trial, the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study to compare the visual outcomes of infants optically corrected with a contact lens vs. an intraocular lens after unilateral cataract surgery. A second area of research has been ocular growth after cataract surgery.

  • Alfred Lane

    Alfred Lane

    Professor of Dermatology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Developing gene therapy for genetic skin diseases is my major focus. Prior to that, we are developing methods to give effective and efficient care to infants with rare and disabling genetic skin diseases including epidermolysis bullosa and ichthyosis as well as infants and children with unusual and difficult to manage vascular malformations. I am also interested in clinical studies within the NICU protecting premature infants’ skin and clinical studies in children with common skin diseases.

  • Barton Lane

    Barton Lane

    Professor of Radiology (Diagnostic Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As a professor in the Medical Center Line, my primary investigative interest has been in clinical neuroradiology. This encompasses spinal cord and spine disease, degenerative and demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system, strokes and infarction, and chronic epilepsy syndromes. Facial and head and neck vascular malformations and hemangiomas have been a focus of interest for many years, with collaborative projects involving dermatology and functional restoration services.

  • Curtis Langlotz

    Curtis Langlotz

    Professor of Radiology (Thoracic Imaging) and of Biomedical Informatics Research

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in the use of deep neural networks and other machine learning technologies to help radiologists detect disease and eliminate diagnostic errors. My laboratory is developing deep neural networks that detect and classify disease on medical images. We also develop natural language processing methods that use the narrative radiology report to create large annotated image training sets for supervised machine learning experiments.

  • Benjamin Laniakea

    Benjamin Laniakea

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Dr. Benjamin Laniakea is a board-certified family medicine physician specializing in full-spectrum LGBTQ+ health. He graduated from the SUNY at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical sciences and attended residency at UCSF Fresno Family and Community Medicine residency program. Since 2018 he has been the Theme Lead for the Sex, Gender, and Sexual Function curriculum at the Stanford School of Medicine and spearheads the new Stanford LGBTQ+ program.

  • Maarten Lansberg, MD, PhD

    Maarten Lansberg, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research involves the design and conduct of clinical trials to discover new treatments for patients who have suffered a stroke. These trials span treatment of acute stroke, stroke recovery, and stroke prevention. My research in acute stroke is primarily focused on the use of advanced neuroimaging methods (CT and MRI) to select patients who are most likely to benefit from therapies aimed at restoring blood flow to the brain in patients who have suffered a stroke.

  • Bryan Lanzman, MD

    Bryan Lanzman, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiology

    Bio Dr. Bryan Lanzman completed his medical degree and radiology residency at Columbia University Medical Center, before coming to Stanford University for a 2-year Neuroradiology fellowship. He joined the faculty at Stanford in 2017 and is actively involved in medical student and resident education, as well as quality improvement efforts within the neuroradiology section. He also serves as a co-director of the Neuroradiology clerkship for medical students, and for the Neuroradiology elective for neurology residents.

  • Kathleen Larkin

    Kathleen Larkin

    Clinical Instructor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pediatric pain, palliative care, regional anethesia, and acupuncture.

  • David Larson

    David Larson

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Bio David B. Larson, MD, MBA, is Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University, where he also serves as the Vice Chair for Education and Clinical Operations. He serves as the Associate Chief Quality Officer for Improvement for Stanford Health Care and physician co-leader of the Stanford Medicine Center for Improvement Dr. Larson is a national thought leader in radiology quality improvement and patient safety, and a regular speaker regarding topics ranging from pediatric CT radiation dose optimization to radiology peer learning. He is the executive director of Stanford?s Realizing Improvement through Team Empowerment (RITE) program and co-director of the Clinical Effectiveness Leadership Training (CELT) program. He also leads the Stanford Medicine Improvement Capability Development Program.

    Dr. Larson is the Founder and Program Chair for the Radiology Improvement Summit held annually at Stanford, now in its fourth year. He also serves on the Board of Trustees of the American Board of Radiology, overseeing quality and safety, and on the Board of Directors of the Society for Pediatric Radiology. He serves on the Board of Chancellors for the American College of Radiology as the Chair of the ACR's Commission on Quality and Safety.

    Prior to his position at Stanford, Dr. Larson was the Janet L. Strife Chair for Quality and Safety in Radiology and a faculty member of the James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence at Cincinnati Children?s Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio. He holds MD and MBA degrees from Yale University and completed his training at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, Colorado. Dr. Larson is a pediatric radiologist at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. He and his wife, Tara, live in Portola Valley, California and have four children.

  • Ruth Lathi, M.D.

    Ruth Lathi, M.D.

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Recurrent miscarriage, genetic and other causes of miscarriage, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, effects of fertility treatments on androgen levels in early pregnancy and how fertility diagnosis and treatments affect pregnancy outcomes.

  • Amira Latif Hernandez

    Amira Latif Hernandez

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Amira obtained her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the KU Leuven, Belgium, in summer 2017. During her doctoral studies, she used clinically valid tests of murine cognition, neuronal plasticity measures in hippocampal and cortical slices, brain lesion methods, pharmacological applications and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging to characterize the pathophysiology of novel mouse models of Alzheimer?s disease (AD). One of her most gratifying contributions was the development of a new electrophysiology tool to assess synaptopathies, and the establishment of long-term synaptic plasticity from prefrontal cortex of APP knock-in mice. In Autumn 2017, she moved to Dr. Longo?s lab at the Stanford School of Medicine, where she investigates signaling pathways involved in synaptic degeneration. During 3 years of postdoctoral work, she established a multi-electrode array system with eight independent recording chambers that allows high-throughput analyses of multiple long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity. She also gained experience in RNA-sequencing, molecular biochemistry, signaling mechanisms, target validation and drug development strategies for AD. In October 2020, Amira has been appointed as an Instructor in Neurodegenerative Disease Research, in the Longo lab, to help develop improved and more powerful approaches that will better reveal key synaptic mechanisms and candidate modules associated with neuroplasticity and affected in AD mouse models, by identifying activity-dependent gene expression signatures.

  • Philip W. Lavori

    Philip W. Lavori

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Biostatistics, clinical trials, longitudinal studies, casual inference from observational studies, genetic tissue banking, informed consent. Trial designs for dynamic (adaptive) treatment regimes, psychiatric research, cancer.

  • Shelby Scott Lazarow, Psy.D.

    Shelby Scott Lazarow, Psy.D.

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Lazarow is a licensed psychologist who specializes in providing clinical care for individuals dealing with acute and chronic medical conditions. She received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium and completed her clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at California Pacific Medical Center in the Health Psychology track. Dr. Lazarow is currently serving patients of the Neuropsychiatry Clinic at Stanford University's School of Medicine.

  • Isabel M. Lazo, MD

    Isabel M. Lazo, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Gynecologic Oncology

    Bio Dr. Lazo is a fellowship-trained gynecologic oncologist and a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Lazo uses evidenced-based approaches to treat patients with endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer, uterine sarcoma, malignant bowel obstruction, and other conditions. She has fellowship training in gynecologic oncology and palliative medicine.

    In all cases, she develops a comprehensive care plan personalized to the unique needs of each patient and family. Her goals are always to deliver compassionate care of the highest quality, achieve the best possible outcome, and optimize quality of life. Dr. Lazo is bilingual, caring for patients in English and Spanish.

    Dr. Lazo has published on the topic of uterine sarcoma prediction before hysterectomy in the Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology. Her research interests also include histological responses to chemotherapy before surgery in advanced-stage endometrial cancer patients.

    She has investigated the sexual, psychological, and broad quality of life of gynecologic cancer survivors. Dr. Lazo has presented the findings of her research at meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Society of Gynecologic Oncology, American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and Western Association of Gynecologic Oncologists.

    Dr. Lazo has won awards for leadership in medical student education. Her passion for teaching is also reflected in her community involvement. She has appeared on Telemundo to discuss HPV vaccination education and disparities in rates of HPV-related cancer afflicting the Latino and Black communities. She has done extensive volunteer community outreach, providing services to free clinics, a women?s shelter, and rape crisis center. She has also developed community education materials on palliative care.

  • Laura C. Lazzeroni, Ph.D.

    Laura C. Lazzeroni, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Statistics/Data Science. I develop & apply models, methods & algorithms for complex data in medical science & biology. I am also interested in the interplay between fundamental statistical properties (e.g. variability, bias, p-values) & how scientists actually use & interpret data. My work in statistical genetics includes: the invention of Plaid bi-clustering for gene expression data; methods for twin, association, & family studies; multiple testing & estimation for high dimensional arrays.

  • Quynh-Thu Le, MD

    Quynh-Thu Le, MD

    Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory research interest focuses on the identification of biomarkers for prognosis in patients with head & neck or lung cancers. I am also conducting a number of clinical trials specifically in patients with head & neck cancers.

  • Scheherazade Le, MD

    Scheherazade Le, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neurophysiology, Epilepsy/EEG, Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring,Tuberous Sclerosis, Autoimmune Epilepsy/Encephalitis

  • Melanie Lean

    Melanie Lean

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Melanie Lean, Clin.Psych.D. is a post-doctoral research fellow in the INSPIRE clinic. Trained at University College London, Dr Lean is competent in multiple therapeutic modalities, namely Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) (including CBT for psychosis), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Systemic Family Therapy. She has experience working in co-produced services in the UK at the mental health charity, MIND in Camden, including co-facilitating Hearing Voices and Voice Collective groups to support young people who hear, see or sense things that other?s don?t. Dr Lean has over 15 years? experience in clinical research, nine of those in mental health working across a range of settings and populations. She has specialized knowledge in self-management and peer support interventions for people with severe mental illness and has experience working alongside service user researchers in the evaluation and delivery of study interventions.

  • Hayley Wheeler Leatham, MD

    Hayley Wheeler Leatham, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Dermatology

    Bio Dr. Leatham is a dermatologist and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Dermatology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Her clinical interests include the prevention and treatment of skin cancer, acne, psoriasis, and dermatologic surgery, as well as the full range of general dermatologic skin conditions.

    Dr. Leatham?s research interests include the relationship between interferon expression, clinical characteristics, and prognosis in patients with dermatomyositis. She has co-authored articles on clinical factors associated with this condition, as well as other subjects such as blistering dermatosis as a sign of multiple myeloma relapse. Her work has appeared in the Journal of Cutaneous Pathology, Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology Case Reports, Medicine, and other journals.

    Presentations by Dr. Leatham have addressed cutaneous coccidioidomycosis and a range of dermatomyositis-related topics, including interferon activity and malignancy screening outcomes. She has delivered these presentations at the annual meetings of the American Academy of Dermatology, Rheumatologic Dermatology Society, American College of Rheumatology, and Society of Investigative Dermatology.

    During medical school, Dr. Leatham was honored to be selected into the Stanford Gold Humanism Honor Society for demonstrating excellence in clinical care, leadership, compassion, and dedication to service. She was also inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha medical honor society during her chief resident year.

    Her community service activities include volunteering for SUNSPORT, the Stanford University Network for Sun Protection, Outreach, Research, and Teamwork, the most comprehensive sun protection outreach and research program of any university in the nation. This initiative provides risk awareness and sun protection education to Stanford outdoor athletes and fans, as well as all students, faculty, and staff. It is a collaborative effort of the Stanford Department of Dermatology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford Hospital & Clinics, and Stanford Athletics.

  • Samuel LeBaron

    Samuel LeBaron

    Professor of Medicine (Family and Community Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Physician-patient communication; cross cultural dimensions of health care; strategies for health maintenance and promotion; integrative medicine.

Stanford Medicine Resources: