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School of Medicine


Showing 101-150 of 176 Results

  • Jose R. Maldonado, MD, FAPM

    Jose R. Maldonado, MD, FAPM

    John and Terry Levin Family Professor of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Emergency Medicine and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pathophysiology and Management of Delirium, Acute Brain Failure and Cognitive Impairment, Neuropsychiatric Sequelae of Traumatic Brain Injury, Factitious Disorder & Munchausen's Syndrome, Cultural Diversity in Medical Care, Psychiatric Complications of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Conversion Disorder, Depression in the Medically Ill, Neuropsychiatric Sequelae of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

  • Rachel Manber, PhD

    Rachel Manber, PhD

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1) Insomnia during pregnancy
    2) Acupuncture for chronic low back pain

  • Johnna Medina

    Johnna Medina

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Johnna Medina, PhD, is a Clinical Instructor at Stanford medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, where she is an attending psychologist in the Addiction Medicine/Dual-Diagnosis Clinic and continues to collaborate on research projects evaluating mind-body interrelationships (e.g., stress and health) and interventions (e.g., hypnosis, yoga). Dr. Medina earned her bachelor's degrees in Psychology and Art Practice at Stanford University (2009) and her PhD in Clinical Psychology at UT Austin (2017). Her dissertation research focused on exercise and yoga-based interventions for targeting anxiety-related risk and maintenance factors underlying addictive behaviors. She returned to Stanford to complete her postdoctoral research fellowship (2017-2019) as a T32 scholar working under Dr. David Spiegel in the Center on Stress and Health Lab.

  • Adam Miner

    Adam Miner

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Miner is a licensed clinical psychologist and epidemiologist.

    He uses experimental and observational studies to improve the ability to conversational artificial intelligence (AI) to recognize and respond to health issues.

    He completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford's Clinical Excellence Research Center (CERC) before joining the Department of Psychiatry as an Instructor and being awarded a Mentored Career Development Award (KL2) through Spectrum and the NIH. He completed a Masters in Epidemiology and Clinical Research from Stanford Department of of Epidemiology and Population Health.

    Dr. Miner conducts translational research often at the intersection of computer science and medicine.

  • Michelle Monje

    Michelle Monje

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, of Pediatrics, of Pathology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Monje Lab studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of postnatal neurodevelopment. This includes microenvironmental influences on neural precursor cell fate choice in normal neurodevelopment and in disease states.

  • Kelli Moran-Miller, PhD

    Kelli Moran-Miller, PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Kelli Moran-Miller is a licensed psychologist specializing in athlete mental health and sport and performance psychology. She is a Certified Mental Performance Consultant with the Association of Applied Sport Psychology and a member of the US Olympic Committee registry. She has practiced at Stanford Hospital and Clinics since 2015. In her current role with Stanford Athletics, she provides clinical and performance psychology services for varsity student-athletes, coaches, staff, and varsity sport teams. Prior to Stanford, she was the Director of Counseling and Sport Psychology - Athletics at the University of Iowa.

  • Kalpana Isabel Nathan

    Kalpana Isabel Nathan

    Adjunct Clinical Professor [El Camino Hospital], Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Kalpana Nathan, MD is an attending psychiatrist at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System and a clinical associate professor (affiliated) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine. After completion of residency and research fellowship at Stanford, she served 4 years at the San Francisco General Hospital/UCSF, gaining experience in the areas of substance use, HIV and public health. She has worked and taught in various settings, both inpatient and outpatient, as well as private and public sectors. She is board certified in General, Addiction and Forensic Psychiatry. Her interests include wellness and self-care for physicians, philosophy and human rights education. She is a certified meditation teacher, has completed sprint and Olympic triathlons, and enjoys traveling around the world. She received the outstanding community clerkship preceptor award in 2010 and the Arthur L. Bloomfield Award in Recognition of Excellence in the Teaching of Clinical Medicine in 2015 at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Recent Publications:
    1. Nathan N & Nathan KI: Suicide, Stigma, and Utilizing Social Media Platforms to Gauge Public Perceptions. Front. Psychiatry 2020 January 13

    2. Tran BX, Nathan KI, Phan HT, Hall BJ, Vu GT et al: A Global Bibliometric Analysis of Services for Children Affected by HIV/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: Implications for Impact Mitigation Programs (GAPRESEARCH). AIDS Rev. 2019 Oct 3;21(3).

    3.Lee A, Nathan KI: Understanding Psychosis in a Veteran With a History of Combat and Multiple Sclerosis. Fed Pract. 2019 Jun;36(Suppl 4):S32-S35.

    4. Tran BX, Ha GH, Vu GT, Nguyen LH, Latkin CA, Nathan K, McIntyre RS, Ho CS, Tam WW, Ho RC: Indices of Change, Expectations, and Popularity of Biological Treatments for Major Depressive Disorder between 1988 and 2017: A Scientometric Analysis. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Jun 26;16(13)

  • Douglas Noordsy

    Douglas Noordsy

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Douglas L. Noordsy, MD, is Clinical Professor and Director of Lifestyle Psychiatry, and psychiatrist on the INSPIRE Early Psychosis Clinic in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Noordsy was previously Professor of Psychiatry, Director of Psychosis Services and Investigator in the Psychopharmacology Research Group at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. His research interests include medication and lifestyle interventions for individuals with psychotic disorders; methods to facilitate recovery and promote achievement of optimal outcomes for people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder; and methods to prevent progression of early psychotic disorders. He is particularly interested in the role of physical exercise for prevention of progression of early psychosis and for potentiating learning in CBTp and supported employment and education. Dr. Noordsy is a member of the Schizophrenia International Research Society, the International Early Psychosis Association, and is a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. He is a member of the editorial boards for Community Mental Health Journal, Clinical Schizophrenia & Related Psychosis, and Schizophrenia Bulletin. Dr. Noordsy was recognized with the Exemplary Psychiatrist Award from the National Alliance on Mental Illness in 2001, and the Excellence in Leadership Award from the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford in 2018.

    http://med.stanford.edu/psychiatry/patient_care/inspire.html

    http://med.stanford.edu/psychiatry/patient_care/sports.html

  • Nichole Olson

    Nichole Olson

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Nichole Olson is a Clinical Assistant Professor and licensed psychologist in the INSPIRE Clinic and Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) program at Stanford. Dr. Olson completed her masters and doctorate degrees at Northwestern University in Chicago and finished her postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University. Dr. Olson specializes in evidence-based, recovery-oriented care for individuals with psychosis, providing both individual and group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis (CBTp) to adults within the INSPIRE Clinic. In addition, Dr. Olson leads trainings and ongoing consultation for providers learning to implement CBTp. As a clinician and Assistant Director of Stanford?s DBT program, Dr. Olson also provides individual DBT treatment for those with emotion regulation difficulties.

  • Lilya Osipov

    Lilya Osipov

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Osipov is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University Medical Center. She completed her Post-Doctoral Fellowship at Stanford University. Dr. Osipov specializes in evaluation of children, adolescents and adults with eating disorders, obesity, and emotion dysregulation. Her current research interests focus on processes maintaining disordered eating behaviors and assessment and intervention with bariatric surgery candidates.

  • Pablo Paredes Castro

    Pablo Paredes Castro

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests PRECISE, PERSONALIZED & AFFORDABLE WELLBEING TECHNOLOGY

    Combining medicine, design, and engineering principles, we research novel technologies to keep people healthy and productive. Our goal is to discover revolutionary ways of broadly delivering both universal and selective, preventive, and self-sustaining, daily life interventions.

  • Lisa Post

    Lisa Post

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Lisa Post, Ph.D. is a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in the treatment of anxiety, depression and adjustment disorders in adults. She has been a practicing clinician at Stanford Hospital and Clinics since 1993. Since 2000, she has been Director of a clinical program for Stanford Varsity Athletes and for nine years has been the Team Clinician for the San Francisco 49ers. Her primary interest are in the treatment of high performing individuals and in stress management.

  • Michael Quach, MD

    Michael Quach, MD

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio I am a board certified psychiatrist in San Jose, CA with over 14 years of clinical experience. I specialize in Men's Mental Health. My practice focuses on assisting adult male professionals who are struggling with mental health issues.

    I completed my medical training at Stanford University School of Medicine and my Psychiatric Residency at Stanford Hospital and Clinics. I was Chief Resident in the Stanford Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and recipient of the prestigious Stanford George Gulevich Humanistic Medicine Award in 2006.

    I currently serve as Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. I feel privileged and honored to be part of the Stanford Adjunct Clinical Faculty and to teach the brightest and most dedicated Stanford Medical Students over the past 12 years.

    I am board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN), and I am a Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association (FAPA). I am also an active member of the Northern California Psychiatric Society (NCPS), the California Psychiatric Association (CPA), the American Psychiatric Association (APA), and Lifetime Member of the Stanford Alumni Association (SAA).

    Clinical Focus
    ?Psychiatry
    ?Psychopharmacology
    ?Psychotherapy
    ?Men's Mental Health

    Academic Appointments
    ?Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Professional Education
    ?Medical Education: Stanford University School of Medicine
    ?Residency: Stanford Hospital and Clinics
    ?Board Certification: Psychiatry, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
    ?Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association (FAPA)

    Publications
    J Am Geriatr Soc. 1994 Nov;42(11):1218-9.
    Oral temperature changes and cognitive decline in Alzheimer patients: a possible association.
    Robinson D, Omar SJ, Quach M, Yesavage JA, Tinklenberg J.

  • Amer Raheemullah

    Amer Raheemullah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Amer Raheemullah, MD, is Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine and Director of the Addiction Medicine Consult Service at Stanford Hospital. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine and has a special interest in developing methods to increase access to basic addiction treatment, through hospital settings, telehealth digital solutions, and criminal justice settings.

    He was born and raised in the Chicagoland area and pursued his undergraduate degree in Economics at the University of Illinois. He worked within the jails and prisons to provide free education and addiction programs for years until completing his Internal Medicine training at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. He moved on to complete an Addiction Medicine fellowship at Stanford and stayed on the faculty to launch the Addiction Medicine Consult Service which offers addiction interventions to hospitalized patients by a team of addiction medicine specialists, peer recovery counselors, and complex care manager. He lives with his wife and two children in the Bay Area where he also helps design digital solutions to increase access to addiction treatment.

  • Hannah Elizabeth Raila

    Hannah Elizabeth Raila

    Academic Staff - Hourly - Csl, Continuing Studies

    Bio Dr. Hannah Raila's training focuses the "diet" of visual information that we consume as we navigate the world (e.g., do we see the crack in the wall, or do we pass by it unaware?), the factors that predispose us to detect this emotional information in our environment the first place, and how this diet of information influences our emotions. To study our visual biases and how they relate to how we feel, she leverages tools from cognitive psychology - including eye tracking and continuous flash suppression (CFS).

    As a postdoctoral researcher in Dr. Carolyn Rodriguez's lab, she is particularly interested in links between visual attention and emotion in OCD, and whether biased visual processing of obsession-related cues contributes to symptom severity.

  • Douglas Rait

    Douglas Rait

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Rait's clinical and research interests include couples and family therapy, the family context of health and illness, family-systems training in medical education, work-couple-family balance, the influence of technology on family relationships, health technology innovation, multidisciplinary team performance, and digital applications in the behavioral sciences.

  • Kristin Raj

    Kristin Raj

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Raj specializes in the treatment of mood disorders with an expertise in neuromodulation and in the psychopharmacological management of bipolar disorder. She is co-chief of the mood disorders section and chief of the bipolar clinic. She is the director of education for interventional psychiatry where she manages resident education in ECT and TMS and development of didactics. She is also co-director of the neuroscience curriculum for the psychiatry residency where she has worked to assess and create a new series of interactive lectures. She currently serves on the Board of Directors and the Education Committee of the Clinical TMS society. She is on the Education Committee of the National Neurosciences Curriculum Initiative.

  • Natalie L. Rasgon

    Natalie L. Rasgon

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Rasgon has been involved in longitudinal placebo-controlled neuroendocrine studies for nearly two decades, and she has been involved in neuroendocrine and brain imaging studies of estrogen effects on depressed menopausal women for the last eight years. It should be noted that in addition to her duties as a Professor of Psychiatry and Obstetrics & Gynecology, Dr. Rasgon is also the Director of the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Program and of the Women's Wellness Program.

  • Cristin Runfola

    Cristin Runfola

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Runfola's research focuses on the epidemiology of dysregulated eating and weight concerns in undeserved populations and her primary interest is in developing and testing the efficacy of clinical interventions designed to improve outcome for eating disorders.

    With support from GFED, Dr. Runfola adapted the Uniting Couples in the treatment of Anorexia Nervosa (UCAN) therapy manual for couples in which one or both members have binge-eating disorder (UNITE) and recently completed pilot testing on this treatment. She is in the process of expanding this treatment for all couples affected by binge eating, and is submitting a grant to fund future work testing efficacy.

  • Debra Safer

    Debra Safer

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Primary research interests include the nature and treatment of eating disorders
    (particularly bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder), the development and treatment of obesity, and the development and treatment of problematic eating patterns in patients following bariatric surgery.

  • Gregory Lee Sahlem

    Gregory Lee Sahlem

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology)

    Bio Dr.Sahlem is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He is board-certified in general psychiatry and addictions medicine, as well as fellowship-trained in the research and clinical application of neuromodulation-based treatments including repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS), electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). He additionally has advanced training in the treatment of mood and sleep disorders. In addition to being an active clinician, Dr.Sahlem is a member of the Stanford Brain Stimulation Lab and directs the Addictions Research Section of the Lab.

    Major areas of study for Dr.Sahlem include: The development of rTMS as a focused treatment for addictive disorders; the development of a novel form of ECT theorized to have reduced cognitive side effects, Focal Electrically Administered Seizure Therapy (FEAST), and; the further development of rTMS for the treatment of mood disorders.

  • Katherine Sanborn

    Katherine Sanborn

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr Katherine Sanborn specializes in the treatment of psychiatric inpatients. She has practiced Psychiatry for more than 15 years. Dr. Sanborn has a special interests in residency education, psychotherapy training, administration and developmental psychopathology.

  • Vidushi Savant

    Vidushi Savant

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neural networks and AI for behavioral health applications

  • Alan F. Schatzberg

    Alan F. Schatzberg

    Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Biological bases of depressive disorders;, glucocorticoid/dopamine interactions in delusional depression;, pharmacologic treatment of depressive disorders.

  • Mariana Schmajuk

    Mariana Schmajuk

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Mariana Schmajuk received her medical school education at Boston University School of Medicine in 2012. She completed her General Adult Psychiatry Residency program Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York in 2016, serving as Chief Resident with a focus on the early transition from medical school to residency. She went on to complete her Consult-Liaison fellowship at New York-Presbyterian Hospital Columbia University Medical Center in 2017.

    Dr. Schmajuk joined Stanford University CLP team in 2017. She is a primary member of the emergency medicine consultations, working collaboratively with a nurse practioner, social worker and residents. Clinically, Dr. Schmajuk focuses on treating patients with terminal neurological disorders and oncological processes. Dr. Schmajuk is the director of the Psychosomatic Continuity clinic where residents and fellows are able to assess and longitudinally treat patients with psychiatric sequela in the context of complex medical illness. She has a particular interest in brief psychotherapeutic interventions. She enjoys teaching medical students about CL psychiatry and interviewing skills. At present, Dr. Schmajuk is using techniques of applied improvisation to educate psychiatry residents and others about the building blocks of communication. She also is an active member of the bioethics committee.

  • Shebani Sethi Dalai MD

    Shebani Sethi Dalai MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical and academic interests are in the management of psychiatric disorders with co-morbid obesity, poor metabolic health and/or eating disorders, particularly binge eating disorder and bulimia nervosa. Improving metabolic and mental health through dietary interventions, pharmacological optimization, and other lifestyle means in those with severe mental illness, such as bipolar disorder or schizophrenia is another major focus of her research.

  • Ripal Shah

    Ripal Shah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Ripal Shah, M.D., M.P.H. is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences. She specializes clinically in reproductive psychiatry (the Women's Wellness Clinic - pre-conception, pregnancy, postpartum, breastfeeding, fertility, PMDD, reproductive and sexual health disorders), lifestyle and integrative approaches to health (the Stanford Center for Integrative Medicine - vitamins, minerals, supplements, exercise, behavioral modifications), and in physician wellness (the WellConnect program - serving Stanford resident/fellow/faculty physicians).

    Her research areas of focus are on women's reproductive psychiatry, integrative approaches to mental health, diversity & inclusion program development, the intersection of race and sexuality, ethnicity-dependent variability in mental health access and treatment response, and minority stress. Outside of consultations, she specializes in psychotherapy for minority populations, particularly those struggling with issues related to identity (religious identification, racial/ethnic minority stress, racial trauma, professional transitions, changes in family structure or relational status, sexual orientation), as well as cognitive-behavioral therapy for ADHD and anxiety disorders.

    While in training at Stanford, she served as Chief Resident and led Community Partnerships and Diversity & Inclusion efforts. She consistently ranked #1 in the Stanford residency (and top 1% in the nation) on the annual knowledge-based examination (PRITE). She is a Disaster Mental Health Responder both domestically and internationally, most recently in California after the wildfires, in Florida after Hurricane Irma and Maria, and in Kathmandu following the Nepal earthquake. She founded and led the Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Council (DIAC) for psychiatry faculty and residents which is now a model organization for training programs across the country, built and then graduated from a Diversity & Health Equity track in the residency training program, and created the first known Diversity & Health Equity Grand Rounds series. She served as Chair of the Chief Residents? Council, representing over a thousand physicians to the Stanford Health Care leadership. Before her time at Stanford, she completed an M.P.H. at the Harvard School of Public Health in Health Care Management and Policy, an M.D. from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, and a B.S. from Duke University in Economics and Biochemistry. She is board certified in Adult Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine. She pursued additional training in the fields of Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine, which has informed her evidence-based approach to integrative medicine.

  • Yelizaveta Sher

    Yelizaveta Sher

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Sher received her BA from UC Berkeley and MD from Washington University in St. Louis. She completed Residency in Psychiatry and Fellowship in Psychosomatic Medicine at Stanford University Medical Center. She has been a part of Psychosomatic Medicine Faculty at Stanford since 2013. Her areas of clinical and research interests include psychiatric comorbidities in patients with pulmonary disorders. In particular, she specializes in mental health of patients with cystic fibrosis as well as lung and heart transplant patients. She consults on patients hospitalized on medical and surgical units as well as sees patients in outpatient clinics. She serves as a Mental Health Coordinator for the Adult Cystic Fibrosis Clinic.

  • Hugh Brent Solvason PhD MD

    Hugh Brent Solvason PhD MD

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My work is focused on novel interventional treatment approaches for treatment resistant unipolar and bipolar depression. We are currently enrolling patients with treatment refractory bipolar depression for a radiosurgical neuromodulation study. We are awaiting the start of enrollment for a DBS in unipolar depression study.
    I am also working with children in Sub Saharan Africa. Primarily I am focused on methods to assess well-being, and long term outcomes for these vulnerable children.

  • Barbara Sommer

    Barbara Sommer

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in the clinical investigation of cognitive stresses during younger adulthood that may give rise to frank intellectual impairment with older age. Examples may include specific kinds of chronically taken medications.

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