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School of Medicine


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  • Gill Bejerano

    Gill Bejerano

    Professor of Developmental Biology, of Computer Science, of Pediatrics (Genetics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Bejerano, co-discoverer of ultraconserved elements, studies the Human Genome. His research focuses on genome sequence and function in both humans and related primate, mammalian and vertebrate species. He is deeply interested in mapping both coding and non-coding genome sequence variation to phenotype differences, and in extracting specific genetic insights from high throughput sequencing measurements, in the contexts of development and developmental abnormalities.

  • Jon Bernstein

    Jon Bernstein

    Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research is focused on the diagnosis, discovery and delineation of rare genetic conditions with a focus of neurodevelopmental disorders. This work includes the application of novel computational methods and multi-omics profiling (whole genome sequencing, RNA sequencing, metabolomics). I additionally participate in an interdisciplinary project to develop induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models of genetic neurodevelopmental disorders..

  • Tina Cowan

    Tina Cowan

    Professor of Pathology (Clinical) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Genetics)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests screening and diagnosis of patients with inborn errors of metabolism, including newborn screening, development of new testing methods and genotype/phenotype correlations.

  • John W. Day, MD, PhD

    John W. Day, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology, of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our Neuromuscular Division coordinates a comprehensive effort to conquer peripheral nerve and muscle disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, motor neuron disorders, neuromuscular junction abnormalities, and peripheral neuropathies. With patients and families foremost in mind, we have had success defining and combating these diseases, with research focused on identifying genetic causes, developing novel treatment, and maximizing patient function by optimizing current management.

  • Gregory Enns

    Gregory Enns

    Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests mitochondrial genomics, lysosomal disorders, tandem-mass spectrometry newborn screening, and inborn errors of metabolism presentations and natural history

  • Uta Francke

    Uta Francke

    Professor of Genetics and of Pediatrics, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Functional consequences and pathogenetic mechanisms of mutations and microdeletions in human neurogenetic syndromes and mouse models. Integration of genomic information into medical care.

  • Natalia Gomez-Ospina

    Natalia Gomez-Ospina

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics) and of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Gomez-Ospina is a physician scientist and medical geneticist with a strong interest in the diagnosis and management of genetic diseases.

    1) Lysosomal storage diseases:
    Her research program is on developing better therapies for a large class of neurodegenerative diseases in children known as lysosomal storage disorders. Her current focus is on developing genome editing of hematopoietic stem cells as a therapeutic approach for these diseases beginning with Mucopolysaccharidosis type 1 and Gaucher disease. She established a genetic approach where therapeutic proteins can be targeted to a single well-characterized place in the genome known as a safe harbor. This approach constitutes a flexible, ?one size fits all? approach that is independent of specific genes and mutations. This strategy, in which the hematopoietic system is commandeered to express and deliver therapeutic proteins to the brain can potentially change the current approaches to treating childhood neurodegenerative diseases and pave the way for alternative therapies for adult neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer?s and Parkinson?s disease


    2) Point of care ammonia testing
    She also works in collaboration with other researchers at Stanford to develop point-of-care testing for serum ammonia levels. Such device will greatly improve the quality of life of children and families with metabolic disorders with hyperammonemia.

    3) Gene discovery
    Dr Gomez-Ospina lead a multi-institutional collaboration resulting in the discovery of a novel genetic cause of neonatal and infantile cholestatic liver disease. She collaborated in the description of two novel neurologic syndromes caused by mutations in DYRK1 and CHD4.


    For more information go to our website:

    https://www.gomezospina.com/

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